Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 25-09-2011, 04:07 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2009
Posts: 38
Default Deadly Sloes? Help!

Ihave just read on the Plants for a Future site that sloes contain hydrogen cyanide
(particularly the seeds).

We have made sloe liqueur for several years now but this year we decided to try one bottle
where we put the sloes into a blender, instead of pricking them.

Will the resultant liqueur be poisonous?

  #2   Report Post  
Old 25-09-2011, 04:53 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2010
Posts: 31
Default Deadly Sloes? Help!

Kath wrote:

Ihave just read on the Plants for a Future site that sloes contain
hydrogen cyanide (particularly the seeds).

We have made sloe liqueur for several years now but this year we
decided to try one bottle where we put the sloes into a blender,
instead of pricking them.

Will the resultant liqueur be poisonous?


almost
certainly......................................... ......................
..............................y...........n....... ........n...y.........n
..............

makes note to see if you post next year

--
Donnie
"**** the world, it's time to fight back"

Lambretta Series 2 186cc "The Shitter"
Lambretta LD 175cc "The Chopper" SOLD and all the cash went on a telly!
Honda CB500R "Look out, Donnie's about!"
  #3   Report Post  
Old 25-09-2011, 05:16 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2008
Posts: 805
Default Deadly Sloes? Help!

On 25/09/2011 16:53, Donnie wrote:
Kath wrote:

Ihave just read on the Plants for a Future site that sloes contain
hydrogen cyanide (particularly the seeds).

We have made sloe liqueur for several years now but this year we
decided to try one bottle where we put the sloes into a blender,
instead of pricking them.

Will the resultant liqueur be poisonous?


almost
certainly......................................... ......................
.............................y...........n........ .......n...y.........n
.............

makes note to see if you post next year


I usually pick mine after the first frost. With this late burst of
weather they should be nice and sweet by then. It really does make a
difference IME
Must remember to get the gin and find some empty glass bottles from
somewhere. I hear vodka works well too.
  #4   Report Post  
Old 25-09-2011, 06:23 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2009
Posts: 38
Default Deadly Sloes? Help!

On Sun, 25 Sep 2011 17:16:33 +0100, stuart noble wrote:

On 25/09/2011 16:53, Donnie wrote:
Kath wrote:

Ihave just read on the Plants for a Future site that sloes contain
hydrogen cyanide (particularly the seeds).

We have made sloe liqueur for several years now but this year we
decided to try one bottle where we put the sloes into a blender,
instead of pricking them.

Will the resultant liqueur be poisonous?


almost
certainly......................................... ......................
.............................y...........n........ .......n...y.........n
.............

makes note to see if you post next year


I usually pick mine after the first frost. With this late burst of
weather they should be nice and sweet by then. It really does make a
difference IME
Must remember to get the gin and find some empty glass bottles from
somewhere. I hear vodka works well too.


It does and it is very good. White rum too. We buy which ever is the cheapest at the time
as you don't taste the nuances between a good gin and a cheap one.

Go for it!
  #5   Report Post  
Old 25-09-2011, 06:26 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2009
Posts: 38
Default Deadly Sloes? Help!

On Sun, 25 Sep 2011 17:51:22 +0100, Janet wrote:

In article ,
says...

Ihave just read on the Plants for a Future site that sloes contain hydrogen cyanide
(particularly the seeds).


So do plum, cherry, peach and almond kernels and apple pips

We have made sloe liqueur for several years now but this year we decided to try one bottle
where we put the sloes into a blender, instead of pricking them.

Will the resultant liqueur be poisonous?


No more deadly than cider, plum and peach brandy, amaretto and jam.

Janet.

Even if the seeds are damaged? I know that the above fruits have the same in their stones
but they are very hard and don't get damaged.

'The Stories of George the Hamster'
Translated by Lee H and Kathleen Smith
ISBN - 978-0-9546989-3-5
Available from www.arlev.co.uk/george.htm
and from both on line and High Street Bookshops


  #6   Report Post  
Old 25-09-2011, 07:27 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2008
Posts: 805
Default Deadly Sloes? Help!

On 25/09/2011 18:23, Kath wrote:
On Sun, 25 Sep 2011 17:16:33 +0100, stuart wrote:

On 25/09/2011 16:53, Donnie wrote:
Kath wrote:

Ihave just read on the Plants for a Future site that sloes contain
hydrogen cyanide (particularly the seeds).

We have made sloe liqueur for several years now but this year we
decided to try one bottle where we put the sloes into a blender,
instead of pricking them.

Will the resultant liqueur be poisonous?

almost
certainly......................................... ......................
.............................y...........n........ .......n...y.........n
.............

makes note to see if you post next year


I usually pick mine after the first frost. With this late burst of
weather they should be nice and sweet by then. It really does make a
difference IME
Must remember to get the gin and find some empty glass bottles from
somewhere. I hear vodka works well too.


It does and it is very good. White rum too. We buy which ever is the cheapest at the time
as you don't taste the nuances between a good gin and a cheap one.

Go for it!


Oh I will! I just never seem to have enough screw top bottles
  #7   Report Post  
Old 25-09-2011, 07:37 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Sep 2011
Posts: 1
Default Deadly Sloes? Help! - to prick or not to prick?

Sorry to hijack your thread Kath, but you reminded me....

When making sloe/damson gin, who pricks the fruit?
I tried it, but found the only difference it made was it made the liquid
cloudy.
N

  #8   Report Post  
Old 25-09-2011, 10:02 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Feb 2007
Posts: 437
Default Deadly Sloes? Help! - to prick or not to prick?


"Neil Bush" wrote in message
o.uk...
Sorry to hijack your thread Kath, but you reminded me....

When making sloe/damson gin, who pricks the fruit?
I tried it, but found the only difference it made was it
made the liquid cloudy.
N


I always prick the fruit and have no problem with
cloudiness. I followed one stupid recipe that said to put
them in the freezer first, and then allow them to thaw and
add the gin & sugar. What a disaster. So cloudy I wouldn't
offer it to anyone (so I'll have to drink it all meself
then, he, he). Seriously, pricking works well for me, I get
a nice clear drink.


  #9   Report Post  
Old 25-09-2011, 10:51 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2010
Posts: 2,165
Default Deadly Sloes? Help!

On 25/09/2011 16:07, Kath wrote:
Ihave just read on the Plants for a Future site that sloes contain hydrogen cyanide
(particularly the seeds).

We have made sloe liqueur for several years now but this year we decided to try one bottle
where we put the sloes into a blender, instead of pricking them.

Will the resultant liqueur be poisonous?



Hi Kath,

I honestly don't know and, as you haven't had a positively reliable
answer, in your position I would go and chat up a friendly local chemist
who *ought* to know. Just a thought.

--
Spider
from high ground in SE London
gardening on clay
  #10   Report Post  
Old 25-09-2011, 10:59 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2009
Posts: 761
Default Deadly Sloes? Help!

On 25/09/2011 18:16, stuart noble wrote:

I usually pick mine after the first frost. With this late burst of
weather they should be nice and sweet by then. It really does make a
difference IME
Must remember to get the gin and find some empty glass bottles from
somewhere. I hear vodka works well too.


I made mine last week, wanted to get them before the birds. Hardly got
any at all last year. Sloe gin and sloe rum. Tried vodka a couple of
years ago and it isn't as good as the other two in my opinion.
I just put the sloes into the freezer for a day or two to help break
down their pulp a little. Seems to work well. No need to prick them with
a needle as I've heard others suggest.

--
David in Normandy.
To e-mail you must include the password FROG on the
subject line, or it will be automatically deleted
by a filter and not reach my inbox.


  #11   Report Post  
Old 25-09-2011, 11:02 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: May 2009
Posts: 761
Default Deadly Sloes? Help! - to prick or not to prick?

On 25/09/2011 23:02, someone wrote:
"Neil wrote in message
o.uk...
Sorry to hijack your thread Kath, but you reminded me....

When making sloe/damson gin, who pricks the fruit?
I tried it, but found the only difference it made was it
made the liquid cloudy.
N


I always prick the fruit and have no problem with
cloudiness. I followed one stupid recipe that said to put
them in the freezer first, and then allow them to thaw and
add the gin& sugar. What a disaster. So cloudy I wouldn't
offer it to anyone (so I'll have to drink it all meself
then, he, he). Seriously, pricking works well for me, I get
a nice clear drink.



Strange that. I always use the freezer method and mine is never cloudy.
I wonder what we do different? Mine is always a lovely clear red colour.

--
David in Normandy.
To e-mail you must include the password FROG on the
subject line, or it will be automatically deleted
by a filter and not reach my inbox.
  #12   Report Post  
Old 26-09-2011, 06:57 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,103
Default Deadly Sloes? Help!

On Sep 25, 4:07*pm, Kath wrote:
Ihave just read on the Plants for a Future site that sloes contain hydrogen cyanide
(particularly the seeds).

We have made sloe liqueur for several years now but this year we decided to try one bottle
where we put the sloes into a blender, instead of pricking them.

Will the resultant liqueur be poisonous?


Cyanide is also called bitter almond pison, guess why?
Many plants and seeds have poisonous parts to discourage eating.
Apple and pear seeds also contain cyanide.
Virtually every flower you grow in the garden is deadly.
Haulms of potatoes, tomatoes and rhubarb are also deadly. (Oxalic
acid)

We have all developed some resistance to these poisons. It's all part
of nature's continuing chemical warfare.
You have chemical receptors that detect most poisons. Called taste.

Let us know if you die.
  #13   Report Post  
Old 26-09-2011, 11:13 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,716
Default Deadly Sloes? Help!

In message
,
harry writes
On Sep 25, 4:07*pm, Kath wrote:
Ihave just read on the Plants for a Future site that sloes contain
hydrogen cyanide
(particularly the seeds).

We have made sloe liqueur for several years now but this year we
decided to try one bottle
where we put the sloes into a blender, instead of pricking them.

Will the resultant liqueur be poisonous?


Cyanide is also called bitter almond pison, guess why?
Many plants and seeds have poisonous parts to discourage eating.
Apple and pear seeds also contain cyanide.
Virtually every flower you grow in the garden is deadly.


The way I put it is that "to a first approximation 100% of plants are
poisonous". But deadly would be an exaggeration.

Haulms of potatoes, tomatoes and rhubarb are also deadly. (Oxalic
acid)


Potatoes and tomatoes have solanine and other alkaloids.

We have all developed some resistance to these poisons. It's all part
of nature's continuing chemical warfare.
You have chemical receptors that detect most poisons. Called taste.

Let us know if you die.


--
Stewart Robert Hinsley
  #14   Report Post  
Old 26-09-2011, 01:09 PM
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Feb 2006
Location: Chalfont St Giles
Posts: 1,340
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Hogg View Post
OnI would be very cautious. I have it in my mind that about a cup-full
of say peach or apricot kernels contain enough cyanide (actually
amygdalin, a compound containing cyanide) to be fatal.
My late mother used to put apricot kernels in her home-made apricot jam. They were the best bit. Though it is illegal to apricot kernels for human consumption.

Remember, you can kill yourself by drinking a whole bottle of gin in a hurry, also a few spoonsful of salt.
  #15   Report Post  
Old 26-09-2011, 02:02 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Registered User
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Feb 2007
Location: South Wales
Posts: 2,409
Default Deadly Sloes? Help!

On Sep 26, 11:13*am, Stewart Robert Hinsley
wrote:
In message
,
harry writes

On Sep 25, 4:07*pm, Kath wrote:
Ihave just read on the Plants for a Future site that sloes contain
hydrogen cyanide
(particularly the seeds).


We have made sloe liqueur for several years now but this year we
decided to try one bottle
where we put the sloes into a blender, instead of pricking them.


Will the resultant liqueur be poisonous?


Cyanide is also called bitter almond pison, guess why?
Many plants and seeds have poisonous parts to discourage eating.
Apple and pear seeds also contain cyanide.
Virtually every flower you grow in the garden is deadly.


The way I put it is that "to a first approximation 100% of plants are
poisonous". But deadly would be an exaggeration.

Haulms of potatoes, tomatoes and rhubarb are also deadly. (Oxalic
acid)


Potatoes and tomatoes have solanine and other alkaloids.



We have all developed some resistance to these poisons. It's all part
of nature's continuing chemical warfare.
You have chemical receptors that detect most poisons. Called taste.


Let us know if you die.


--
Stewart Robert Hinsley


I suspect you would smell it if it was strong enough to do you any
harm.
You can try it and either You or your Next of Kin could let us know
what happens.


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Growing Sloes wrnchbndr United Kingdom 21 18-11-2010 08:17 PM
Sloes/damsons (slightly OT) Sue United Kingdom 28 25-09-2007 10:11 PM
Deadly Vole Damage bthache Gardening 0 20-05-2003 09:08 PM
Millions Infected With Deadly Parasite Spread By Cats Cy United Kingdom 6 23-01-2003 01:22 AM
Sloes and recipe query subbykins{Chrd} United Kingdom 1 29-10-2002 06:22 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:28 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017