A Gardening forum. GardenBanter.co.uk

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » GardenBanter.co.uk forum » Regional Gardening Discussions » United Kingdom
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Leylandii for burning?



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 27-01-2010, 07:22 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9
Default Leylandii for burning?

Cross-posted to DIY and to Gardening:

A bit late to ask because I've just finished sawing up about half a ton!
However there is another ton to come.

What's leylandii like as a fuel (open fire, and/or wood burner)?

I'm not intending using it until next winter.

Cheers
John
Ads
  #2  
Old 27-01-2010, 07:39 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,908
Default Leylandii for burning?

In article ,
John L wrote:

A bit late to ask because I've just finished sawing up about half a ton!
However there is another ton to come.

What's leylandii like as a fuel (open fire, and/or wood burner)?


Open fire - awful - it spits, like most conifers.

Wood burner - no problem.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
  #3  
Old 27-01-2010, 08:01 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Leylandii for burning?

John L wrote:
Cross-posted to DIY and to Gardening:

A bit late to ask because I've just finished sawing up about half a ton!
However there is another ton to come.

What's leylandii like as a fuel (open fire, and/or wood burner)?

I'm not intending using it until next winter.

Cheers
John

geat for bonfires, even when freshly cut,
huge high flames,
not very eco though.

[g]
  #4  
Old 27-01-2010, 09:25 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default Leylandii for burning?

On 27 Jan, 19:22, John L wrote:

What's leylandii like as a fuel (open fire, and/or wood burner)?


Great, possibly too great. It's very resinous, so it burns like
crazy. Make sure you're capable of burning it safely. If you've
burning logs, dry them a year first, then do it in something with a
lid. They can go off like a grenade when green.

Efficient burning needs a Norwegian box stove, with enough secondary
combustion chamber to cope with burning the producer gas from
conifers. It's also likely to coat your flue with tars and creosote.
  #5  
Old 27-01-2010, 09:29 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
NT
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 130
Default Leylandii for burning?

On Jan 27, 7:22*pm, John L wrote:
Cross-posted to DIY and to Gardening:

A bit late to ask because I've just finished sawing up about half a ton!
However there is another ton to come.

What's leylandii like as a fuel (open fire, and/or wood burner)?

I'm not intending using it until next winter.

Cheers
John


if its a few inches across, better option:
http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php?...Leylandii_Wood


NT
  #6  
Old 28-01-2010, 01:03 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default Leylandii for burning?

In article ,
John L writes:
Cross-posted to DIY and to Gardening:

A bit late to ask because I've just finished sawing up about half a ton!
However there is another ton to come.

What's leylandii like as a fuel (open fire, and/or wood burner)?

I'm not intending using it until next winter.


A friend burned a very large pile of Leylandii clippings.
Brilliant bonfire, followed by a sodding great insurance
claim to have various neighbours' cars repainted, including
one brand new one. The ash destroys modern car paintwork.

--
Andrew Gabriel
[email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
  #7  
Old 28-01-2010, 09:28 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Leylandii for burning?

In message
, Andy
Dingley writes
Efficient burning needs a Norwegian box stove, with enough secondary
combustion chamber to cope with burning the producer gas from
conifers. It's also likely to coat your flue with tars and creosote.

Chimney fire material.
--
Clint Sharp
  #8  
Old 28-01-2010, 09:55 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 423
Default Leylandii for burning?


"John L" wrote in message
...
Cross-posted to DIY and to Gardening:

A bit late to ask because I've just finished sawing up about half a ton!
However there is another ton to come.

What's leylandii like as a fuel (open fire, and/or wood burner)?

I'm not intending using it until next winter.


Absolutely not. It's full of resin or some sort of stuff that spits like
crazy which is dangerous in an open fire.
I have a woodburner and I don't even use conifer wood in that - it can spit
out of the dampers on the front even if open a half inch and set the carpet
on fire whilst you are out of the room for a few minutes.
So my advice is don't use it for fuel in your house.
The foliage makes a good starter for a bonfire even when green but stand
well back if you don't want to lose your eyebrows..

Tina




Tina


  #9  
Old 28-01-2010, 10:27 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,140
Default Leylandii for burning?


"John L" wrote in message
...
Cross-posted to DIY and to Gardening:

A bit late to ask because I've just finished sawing up about half a ton!
However there is another ton to come.

What's leylandii like as a fuel (open fire, and/or wood burner)?

I'm not intending using it until next winter.

Cheers
John


Getting the green stuff off theboughs is a real pain - hardly worth the
effort for theamount of useable timber available. The green fronds burn
ferociously and care is needed. As for the logs, can't say as I've never
used them for house heating. On a garden fire the logs do not burn very
well at all.

Bill


  #10  
Old 28-01-2010, 10:51 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 95
Default Leylandii for burning?

In uk.d-i-y Bill Grey wrote:

"John L" wrote in message
...
Cross-posted to DIY and to Gardening:

A bit late to ask because I've just finished sawing up about half a ton!
However there is another ton to come.

What's leylandii like as a fuel (open fire, and/or wood burner)?

I'm not intending using it until next winter.

Cheers
John


Getting the green stuff off theboughs is a real pain - hardly worth the
effort for theamount of useable timber available. The green fronds burn
ferociously and care is needed. As for the logs, can't say as I've never
used them for house heating. On a garden fire the logs do not burn very
well at all.

Leylandii is pretty good wood for burning as long as it's well
seasoned. All the complaints about it posted here indicate that it
hasn't been dried well enough. We have been felling a row of *big*
Leylandii at our house over the past ten years and burning them on our
wood burner with no problems. They need to be stored for a good
twelve months before burning though.

Leylandii is *much* better than pine and other similar softwood for
burning, although it is technically a softwood it doesn't really
behave like one, it's much denser and tougher.

--
Chris Green

  #11  
Old 28-01-2010, 10:52 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15
Default Leylandii for burning?

John L wrote:

What's leylandii like as a fuel (open fire, and/or wood burner)?


Fine for wood burner as others have said.
  #12  
Old 28-01-2010, 10:53 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 95
Default Leylandii for burning?

In uk.rec.gardening Clint Sharp wrote:
In message
, Andy
Dingley writes
Efficient burning needs a Norwegian box stove, with enough secondary
combustion chamber to cope with burning the producer gas from
conifers. It's also likely to coat your flue with tars and creosote.

Chimney fire material.


Only if it's not properly dried before burning and that applies to
*any* wood you burn. Tar/creosote is produced by burning wood of *any*
sort with high water content.

--
Chris Green

  #13  
Old 28-01-2010, 11:06 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 423
Default Leylandii for burning?


"Steve Firth" wrote in message
.. .
John L wrote:

What's leylandii like as a fuel (open fire, and/or wood burner)?


Fine for wood burner as others have said.


I would say be very careful, I would not describe it as "fine" for a
woodburner if you have a sliding damper on the front of your stove. It will
spit out of it across the room, in my experience.
I tried conifer wood once, I'm glad I was not out for a few hours, it
sparked out from the tiny hole in the damper and set my carpet on fire when
I was upstairs. Never again.

Tina


  #14  
Old 28-01-2010, 11:33 PM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15
Default Leylandii for burning?

Christina Websell wrote:

I would say be very careful, I would not describe it as "fine" for a
woodburner if you have a sliding damper on the front of your stove. It will
spit out of it across the room, in my experience.


I burn leylandii in a wood burner without problems. The woodburner has a
sliding damper on the front. Since the damper is within an anclosure
that is made of the same steel as the woodburner it is hard to see how
it could be "spit out of it across the room".

I tried conifer wood once, I'm glad I was not out for a few hours, it
sparked out from the tiny hole in the damper and set my carpet on fire when
I was upstairs. Never again.


Yew is a conifer.
  #15  
Old 29-01-2010, 02:11 AM posted to uk.d-i-y,uk.rec.gardening
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Leylandii for burning?

Steve Firth wrote:
Christina Websell wrote:

I would say be very careful, I would not describe it as "fine" for a
woodburner if you have a sliding damper on the front of your stove. It will
spit out of it across the room, in my experience.


I burn leylandii in a wood burner without problems. The woodburner has a
sliding damper on the front. Since the damper is within an anclosure
that is made of the same steel as the woodburner it is hard to see how
it could be "spit out of it across the room".


"spit out of it" is not the same as "spit it out"
It's the burning wood that spits out.
 




Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
Copyright 2004-2014 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.