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Old 27-03-2007, 08:38 AM posted to aus.family,aus.gardens
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"Cheryl" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 27 Mar 2007 09:33:54 +1000, eggs
wrote:

What's wrong with shifting hours (where possible) so that people can
pick up their kids? There are plenty of jobs out there where it would
be completely feasible for folks to start work at 7am and stop at 3pm so
they can go pick their kids up from school. In fact, I wouldn't be
surprised if people got more work done if the working day was staggered
so everyone didn't start and finish at the same time. I bet there'd be
a lot of people (including those who don't have kids) who would like a
staggered start/end time option for their jobs.

You're right. I have some friends who don't have kids (and never will
have kids), who like to start work at 7.30am so they can knock off
around 4-4.30pm and miss all the traffic. A boss I used to have would
start work at 9.30-10am and work through to 6pm so she could miss the
traffic. Before I had children I used to work from 7.30am to 3.30pm
at a defence force base and it was perfect, plus since we had flex
time I could work to 4pm, leave earlier than most people and take a
day off once a month. Flex time with set core hours is a great idea
if the company can swing it.

Cheryl


I have flex time with core hours and it is so fantastic. Before kids, I
used to do 7:30 - 3:30 with shorter lunch break so I could have the
occasional flexi day (I accumulated much more flexi time than I took
though) - gave you heaps of time to do a full day's work and do lots of
other things in the afternoon. When Angus was in childcare which didnt open
until 8:00, I started at 8:30 so I could drop him off and be there by 8:30.
Now they are both at school, I am mostly starting at 8:00 and knocking off
at 4:00. All flexible though so if we need to meet a deadline or jobs get
moved due to rain or something, then I can rearrange, stay later, start
earlier or whatever. Flexitime works out great for me and my employer but
my particular kind of job allows that flexibility. More employers should
consider it though as it could be win-win for everyone.

cheers
Leah



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Old 27-03-2007, 02:07 PM posted to aus.family,aus.gardens
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In article ,
"Barbara" wrote:

OK I will admit I came in late and can't be bothered going back through all
the posts but...
Why do you think employers should bear the cost of work place disruption,
that maternity leave causes, ditto with allowing people to knock off work to
pick up the kids?


I think you need to go back to the other thread.

Let me tell you a little story. There was once an engineering firm on
Sydney's Northern Beaches which (at some point) had one of those annoying
employees who take a lot of private calls, fiddled his flextime, came in late
and was generally a pain. Of course the correct way to deal with such a
person is to confront him and punish him, but this firm didn't. Instead they
instituted policies like: no personal phone calls or e-mail under any
circumstances, and they ditched flextime. A friend of ours got a job there.
He said he'd never ever seen an engineering firm where the engineers all left
on the dot of 5pm -- generally engineers love their jobs and happily put in
lots of hours when necessary -- but because they were being treated like
naughty little kids (when none of them had done anything wong in the first
place), they bundied off with the enthusiasm of process workers. Moral: treat
your employees fairly and well, and you'll get not just good work, but
excellence and enthusiasm.

--
Chookie -- Sydney, Australia
(Replace "foulspambegone" with "optushome" to reply)

"Parenthood is like the modern stone washing process for denim jeans. You may
start out crisp, neat and tough, but you end up pale, limp and wrinkled."
Kerry Cue
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Old 28-03-2007, 09:51 AM posted to aus.family,aus.gardens
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Chookie wrote:
Moral: treat
your employees fairly and well, and you'll get not just good work, but
excellence and enthusiasm.



X-theory Vs Y-theory management.

X-theory (treat employees like they are lazy and stupid) is a
self-fulfilling prophecy.


--
That's_ the message; "Donut sit behind leaning cats that have just
farted you blind"!

Dr HotSalt in A.R.K.
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Old 08-04-2007, 02:18 AM posted to aus.family,aus.gardens
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"Cheryl" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 25 Mar 2007 18:58:47 GMT, len garden
wrote:


maybe a safer option for families if families became more extended and
grandparents took on the child care duties for their married siblings,


(I assume you mean married children, although they aren't the only
children that will be requiring childcare) That's fine for those who
chose to have their children at a young age, but it's not so good for
those who didn't have children before their late 30's/early 40's.
Their parents would be heading into their 70's and trying to look
after very active toddlers, which could be a recipe for disaster. The
next generation, those of us who had children later, could potentially
be nearly 80 before our first grandchildren are born.

Coming in late on this thread - this is us. DH and I are in our 40s, my
parents (the only close family we have in Melbourne) are in their 80s. While
they can do the occasional mind of their first and only GD for a few hours
they just don't have what it takes to look after P for any extended time.
They give in to her rather than deal with any battles.
I will be in my 60s when P is most likely to be a parent.

Liz

Liz




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