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Old 08-04-2007, 11:29 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default compost problem

hello,
the first batch of compost i made in my new! tumbling! composter!! was
absolutely tops. this second batch is not going well at all - would anyone
have any thoughts?

at first, it dripped profusely out the holes. then, it heated up. my
goodness!! i had inadvertantly made an incendiary device (don't tell john
howard) and it was actually smoking. i cooled it by turning it often &
leaving the lid off for 4-5 days until it cooled. after it cooled, it
recommenced to drip profusely. now, several weeks later, it's too cold & the
composting stuff has merged into big wet gobs about the size of two fists, i
can't get it heated & the gobs won't break up naturally & to do so with my
hands is extraordinarily unpleasant (whereas i don't normally mind _what_ i
put my hands in, so it's really not nice at all). i added some lime to no
effect. it doesn't smell bad - it just doesn't smell like anything at all
(certainly not that lovely composty smell).

my idea was that tomorrow i'll empty it out & break up the lumps with a
spade, & then put it back in for a while with some more lime & some
partly-decomposed chicken-pooey straw (for carbon with a poo-boost) & see
what it's like after a week. if still no good i might just dump it out to
break down on its own & start again.

does anyone have a better idea? does anyone know what went wrong? i strongly
suspect the materials were just too wet & nitrogenous (iirc it was mainly
fruit peels & such, from the cafe) & not enough carbon, even though there
was quite a bit of paper in there.

thanks for any thoughts!
kylie


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Old 08-04-2007, 11:44 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Posts: 34
Default compost problem

When its smoking, its just right according to the taliban!

Add some shovel fulls of ordinary garden dirt, and the bacteria in
dirt will help a bit, also add some blood and bone.
If you dont add dirt the system wont work normally. Also there's
usually some worm castings in the dirt, which all goes to help.
Let us know how you get it right!
PS a lot of compact stuff is not a good idea. You should use mixed
sizes of compost to allow air into the system....But that may not
aplly to a rotary composter.
I have had this idea for a drum type composter with small wind
assisted rotation attachment.
Will get around to it one day I guess!



0tterbot wrote:
hello,
the first batch of compost i made in my new! tumbling! composter!! was
absolutely tops. this second batch is not going well at all - would anyone
have any thoughts?

at first, it dripped profusely out the holes. then, it heated up. my
goodness!! i had inadvertantly made an incendiary device (don't tell john
howard) and it was actually smoking. i cooled it by turning it often &
leaving the lid off for 4-5 days until it cooled. after it cooled, it
recommenced to drip profusely. now, several weeks later, it's too cold & the
composting stuff has merged into big wet gobs about the size of two fists, i
can't get it heated & the gobs won't break up naturally & to do so with my
hands is extraordinarily unpleasant (whereas i don't normally mind _what_ i
put my hands in, so it's really not nice at all). i added some lime to no
effect. it doesn't smell bad - it just doesn't smell like anything at all
(certainly not that lovely composty smell).

my idea was that tomorrow i'll empty it out & break up the lumps with a
spade, & then put it back in for a while with some more lime & some
partly-decomposed chicken-pooey straw (for carbon with a poo-boost) & see
what it's like after a week. if still no good i might just dump it out to
break down on its own & start again.

does anyone have a better idea? does anyone know what went wrong? i strongly
suspect the materials were just too wet & nitrogenous (iirc it was mainly
fruit peels & such, from the cafe) & not enough carbon, even though there
was quite a bit of paper in there.

thanks for any thoughts!
kylie


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Old 08-04-2007, 01:03 PM posted to aus.gardens
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 805
Default compost problem


"0tterbot" wrote in message
...
hello,
the first batch of compost i made in my new! tumbling! composter!! was
absolutely tops. this second batch is not going well at all - would anyone
have any thoughts?

at first, it dripped profusely out the holes. then, it heated up. my
goodness!! i had inadvertantly made an incendiary device (don't tell john
howard) and it was actually smoking. i cooled it by turning it often &
leaving the lid off for 4-5 days until it cooled. after it cooled, it
recommenced to drip profusely. now, several weeks later, it's too cold &

the
composting stuff has merged into big wet gobs about the size of two fists,

i
can't get it heated & the gobs won't break up naturally & to do so with my
hands is extraordinarily unpleasant (whereas i don't normally mind _what_

i
put my hands in, so it's really not nice at all). i added some lime to no
effect. it doesn't smell bad - it just doesn't smell like anything at all
(certainly not that lovely composty smell).

my idea was that tomorrow i'll empty it out & break up the lumps with a
spade, & then put it back in for a while with some more lime & some
partly-decomposed chicken-pooey straw (for carbon with a poo-boost) & see
what it's like after a week. if still no good i might just dump it out to
break down on its own & start again.

does anyone have a better idea?


if you have some a spare corner in the garden and time on your side bung it
there (or even use as mulch in a fallow garden) and let the worms go to work
on it for 2-3 months. Concentrate on brewing up a better batch of compost
and let your volunteer helpers do their stuff.

rob


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Old 09-04-2007, 12:45 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Posts: 68
Default compost problem

I agree with "george"- give it to our good friends the worms to fix for
you - they love the slimy smelly stuff. Help them out with a bit of lime or
shredded paper.
Geoff



"George.com" wrote in message
...

"0tterbot" wrote in message
...
hello,
the first batch of compost i made in my new! tumbling! composter!! was
absolutely tops. this second batch is not going well at all - would
anyone
have any thoughts?

at first, it dripped profusely out the holes. then, it heated up. my
goodness!! i had inadvertantly made an incendiary device (don't tell john
howard) and it was actually smoking. i cooled it by turning it often &
leaving the lid off for 4-5 days until it cooled. after it cooled, it
recommenced to drip profusely. now, several weeks later, it's too cold &

the
composting stuff has merged into big wet gobs about the size of two
fists,

i
can't get it heated & the gobs won't break up naturally & to do so with
my
hands is extraordinarily unpleasant (whereas i don't normally mind _what_

i
put my hands in, so it's really not nice at all). i added some lime to no
effect. it doesn't smell bad - it just doesn't smell like anything at all
(certainly not that lovely composty smell).

my idea was that tomorrow i'll empty it out & break up the lumps with a
spade, & then put it back in for a while with some more lime & some
partly-decomposed chicken-pooey straw (for carbon with a poo-boost) & see
what it's like after a week. if still no good i might just dump it out to
break down on its own & start again.

does anyone have a better idea?


if you have some a spare corner in the garden and time on your side bung
it
there (or even use as mulch in a fallow garden) and let the worms go to
work
on it for 2-3 months. Concentrate on brewing up a better batch of compost
and let your volunteer helpers do their stuff.

rob




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Old 09-04-2007, 02:16 AM posted to aus.gardens
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Mar 2007
Posts: 34
Default compost problem

I agree but she will not find out what was missing in the second instance.
Always add the shovel full of soil to introduce the proper bacterial
ingredients to the compost, but so not to kill them, add it after the
heap has cooled down. This is what may have happened initially.

Geoff & Heather wrote:
I agree with "george"- give it to our good friends the worms to fix for
you - they love the slimy smelly stuff. Help them out with a bit of lime or
shredded paper.
Geoff



"George.com" wrote in message
...
"0tterbot" wrote in message
...
hello,
the first batch of compost i made in my new! tumbling! composter!! was
absolutely tops. this second batch is not going well at all - would
anyone
have any thoughts?

at first, it dripped profusely out the holes. then, it heated up. my
goodness!! i had inadvertantly made an incendiary device (don't tell john
howard) and it was actually smoking. i cooled it by turning it often &
leaving the lid off for 4-5 days until it cooled. after it cooled, it
recommenced to drip profusely. now, several weeks later, it's too cold &

the
composting stuff has merged into big wet gobs about the size of two
fists,

i
can't get it heated & the gobs won't break up naturally & to do so with
my
hands is extraordinarily unpleasant (whereas i don't normally mind _what_

i
put my hands in, so it's really not nice at all). i added some lime to no
effect. it doesn't smell bad - it just doesn't smell like anything at all
(certainly not that lovely composty smell).

my idea was that tomorrow i'll empty it out & break up the lumps with a
spade, & then put it back in for a while with some more lime & some
partly-decomposed chicken-pooey straw (for carbon with a poo-boost) & see
what it's like after a week. if still no good i might just dump it out to
break down on its own & start again.

does anyone have a better idea?

if you have some a spare corner in the garden and time on your side bung
it
there (or even use as mulch in a fallow garden) and let the worms go to
work
on it for 2-3 months. Concentrate on brewing up a better batch of compost
and let your volunteer helpers do their stuff.

rob






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Old 09-04-2007, 11:10 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Posts: 713
Default compost problem

"Jack" wrote in message
u...
I agree but she will not find out what was missing in the second instance.


i still think it was probably not enough carbon, but just not sure.

Always add the shovel full of soil to introduce the proper bacterial
ingredients to the compost, but so not to kill them, add it after the heap
has cooled down. This is what may have happened initially.


but i shouldn't "need" soil for it (although it might be helpful - i might
pop some into the new lot to see what difference there is), should i? there
was a bit of old compost left behind from the last lot (which was great,
without any soil) & that should have been bacteria a-plenty, logically
thinking.
thanks!
kylie


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Old 09-04-2007, 11:19 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Posts: 713
Default compost problem

"Jack" wrote in message
...
When its smoking, its just right according to the taliban!

Add some shovel fulls of ordinary garden dirt, and the bacteria in dirt
will help a bit, also add some blood and bone.
If you dont add dirt the system wont work normally.


it's worth pointing out that tumbling compost isn't really "normal" :-) for
ordinary compost in a bin, you should have it on the ground directly & i
know some people like to put a layer of soil in their recipe (although
others don't). if it's in a pile on the ground, it will eventually break
down into nice compost come what may & no matter how long it might take, yet
i suspect that if a tumbling composter was just walked away from, you might
not get that, because it's seperated from the normal bugs & usual rotting
environment.

in tumbled compost, you won't have any worms, slaters, & other creatures
that you normally would. it's a different & rather more artifical system.

Also there's
usually some worm castings in the dirt, which all goes to help.
Let us know how you get it right!
PS a lot of compact stuff is not a good idea.


i know!!! i wish i knew why it conglomerated into disgusting gobs. i think
the whole mix was just wrong.

You should use mixed
sizes of compost to allow air into the system....But that may not aplly to
a rotary composter.
I have had this idea for a drum type composter with small wind assisted
rotation attachment.
Will get around to it one day I guess!


it's an interesting idea! i'm pretty sure you wouldn't want it rotating
constantly though, unless you had a really really biiiiig one, so that the
bacteria weren't being constantly tossed about. my theory is that, like with
soil, they need an element of peace & quiet to do their thing, which they
can't do if constantly disturbed (that's just my theory though). you tumble
it a few times every two days with the model i have.
kylie


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Old 09-04-2007, 12:55 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Posts: 34
Default compost problem

OK got you this. Hope it helps.Re rotation, I reckon we need to keep
the oxygen into the pile, and constant rotation while it may disturb
the buildup of heat, mixes the pile better and you should still
manually stop the rotation of the device.

Decomposing organisms need four key elements to thrive:

1. Nitrogen 50%
2. Carbon 50%
3. Moisture
4. Oxygen

For best results, mix materials high in nitrogen (such as clover,
fresh grass clippings,

and livestock manure) and those high in carbon (such as dried leaves
and twigs).

If there is not a good supply of nitrogen-rich material, a handful of
general lawn fertilizer

will help the nitrogen-carbon ratio. Moisture can be provided by
rain, but you may need to water

or cover the pile to keep it damp. Be careful not to saturate the
pile. Turning or mixing the

pile provides oxygen. Frequent turning yields faster decomposition.

Getting started

Many materials can be added to a compost pile, including leaves,
grass clippings,

straw, woody brush, vegetable and fruit scraps, coffee grounds,
livestock manure,

sawdust, and shredded paper. Do not use diseased plants, meat scraps
that may

attract animals, and dog or cat manure which can carry disease.
Composting can be

as simple or as involved as you would like, and depends on how much
yard waste you have,

how fast you want results, and the effort you are willing to invest.

Cold or slow composting

With cold or slow composting, you can just pile grass clippings and
dry leaves on the

ground or in a bin. This method requires no maintenance, but it will
take several

months to a year or more for the pile to decompose. Cold composting
works well if

you are short on time needed to tend the compost pile at least every
other day,

have little yard waste, and are not in a hurry to use the compost.
Keep weeds and

diseased plants out of the mix since the temperatures reached with
cold composting

may not be high enough to kill the weed seeds or disease-causing
organisms. Add yard

waste as it accumulates. Shredding or chopping speeds up the process.

To easily shred material, run your lawn mower over small piles of
weeds and trimmings.

Cold composting has been shown to be better at suppressing soil-borne
diseases than

hot composting. Cold composting also leaves more non-decomposed bits
of material,

which can be screened out if desired.

Hot composting

Hot composting requires more work, but with a few minutes a day and
the right

ingredients you can have finished compost in a few weeks depending on
weather

conditions. The composting season coincides with the growing
season. External temperature has an effect too!

When conditions are favorable for plant growth, those same conditions
work

well for biological activity in the compost pile. However, since compost

generates heat, the process may continue later into the autumn or winter.

Hot piles do best when high-carbon material and high-nitrogen material

are mixed in a 1 to 1 ratio. A pile with the minimum dimensions of 3'
x 3' x 3'

is needed for efficient heating. For best heating, make a heap that is
4 or 5

feet in each dimension. As decomposition occurs, the pile will shrink.

If you don't have this amount at one time, simply stockpile your
materials

until a sufficient quantity is available for proper mixing.

Hot piles reach 110 to 160 degrees Fahrenheit, killing most weed seeds

and plant diseases. Studies have shown that compost produced at these

temperatures has less ability to suppress diseases in the soil since

these temperatures may kill some of the beneficial bacteria necessary

to suppress disease.

WOW what a lot of things to take into account.
Back to my compost heap. It seems to work, and I'm in no hurry...so
its not being watched either.
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Old 10-04-2007, 01:31 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default compost problem


"Jack" wrote in message
u...
OK got you this. Hope it helps.Re rotation, I reckon we need to keep the
oxygen into the pile, and constant rotation while it may disturb the
buildup of heat, mixes the pile better and you should still manually stop
the rotation of the device.

Decomposing organisms need four key elements to thrive:

1. Nitrogen 50%
2. Carbon 50%
3. Moisture
4. Oxygen

(snippage)

i agree with all of that :-)

tried to up the carbon content in my replacement batch back to my usual sort
of mixture. left the gobby compost in an unappetising pile on the ground. my
dog loves compost - he's been making bottom music all night. (sigh).

i think i need to have a better look at the stuff that is coming to us from
the cafe before it goes in. this time around there's much less fruit & much
more coffee grounds so it should go much better. other things that were in
there while it was waiting to go into the tumbler seem mostly broken down
and unidentifiable...

WOW what a lot of things to take into account.
Back to my compost heap. It seems to work, and I'm in no hurry...so its
not being watched either.


i never had any problems with mine when i wasn't in a hurry either :-) it
just used to sit there, really. eventually i'd get to it & it would be so
old & broken down i've ended up with hardly any g. now i am a grown-up
lady i have two standing bins & the rotating one.
kylie


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Old 10-04-2007, 01:37 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Posts: 713
Default compost problem

"Stuart Naylor" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 09 Apr 2007 09:19:11 GMT, "0tterbot" wrote:

"Jack" wrote in message
. au...
When its smoking, its just right according to the taliban!

Add some shovel fulls of ordinary garden dirt, and the bacteria in dirt
will help a bit, also add some blood and bone.
If you dont add dirt the system wont work normally.


it's worth pointing out that tumbling compost isn't really "normal" :-)
for
ordinary compost in a bin, you should have it on the ground directly & i
know some people like to put a layer of soil in their recipe (although
others don't). if it's in a pile on the ground, it will eventually break
down into nice compost come what may & no matter how long it might take,
yet
i suspect that if a tumbling composter was just walked away from, you
might
not get that, because it's seperated from the normal bugs & usual rotting
environment.

in tumbled compost, you won't have any worms, slaters, & other creatures
that you normally would. it's a different & rather more artifical system.


I tend to agree about tumbled compost though mainly from the
perspective that I don't need compost that fast.

Also there's
usually some worm castings in the dirt, which all goes to help.
Let us know how you get it right!
PS a lot of compact stuff is not a good idea.


I have two compost bins. The first being a typical Gedeys bin in full
sun which I fill and then remove the bin to another location.
The second bin is kept moist and shaded and I've added compost worms
and it is a hive of activity. I carefully feed the worms and keep new
compost material moist while at the same time I can remove old
material for pots or my garden by opening doors at the bottom.


if i'd had one with a bottom door i may never have discovered the joys (and
travails ;-) of a tumbler!!

my two ground bins are the cheap, basic kind. fine to just let it rot at
it's own speed, but otherwise extremely difficult to use unless you have so
many of them you can just leave them to it for a year.

your wormy bin sounds very interesting. in the worm book i read (thread up
above somewhere) the author visited a poultry-processing plant and worm farm
in india. they used giant worm-beds to get rid of the heads, feet & feathers
of the chickens. it took (wait for it) 18 days from go to woe, beaks & all.
wow!
kylie




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Old 14-04-2007, 04:46 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default compost problem

"Stuart Naylor" wrote in message
...

Wow is probably the best comment I could make about that too.

Most of the literature to do with feeding worms in worm farms advises
us to cut up vegetable cuttings finely and crush eggs shells etc. but
I've been finding particulary with the worms in the compost bin, that
I can just chuck almost anything in and the worms usually attack it
immediately.

Even now after only this very short time, comparing the increase in
size of the worms in the compost bin to those in the worm farms has
been amazing.

I sometimes need to dispose of a dead cat


should i ask? :-)

and I would have no
hesitation in adding a dead cat to my compost bin containing compost
worms. It would be interesting to see how long it took to get rid of
it compared to the 18 days it took to get rid of rid of the heads,
feet & feathers beaks & all those chickens.


thinking about it, i suspect that if a worm farm or bed is running very
well, there must be a symbiotic relationship between the worms & other
bacteria within; and once this is happening, decomposition happens really
fast. i mean, a worm couldn't eat a chicken beak unless it was dissolving
steadily already :-) your worm bin must have reached that marvellous point
where it's all go. when i had a worm farm (tragedy ensued) i just never got
to that point - it was always slow. then it all went bung & that was that.
yours sounds excellent!!

I only got into worm farms a couple of months ago as a means of
getting rid of dog poo, but have since read that it wasn't such a good
idea to compost dog poo anyway. The better alternative appears to be
to let the local council remove dog poo each week along with the
garbage.


why do you say?

i know there's two schools of thought on poo: one is that all poo is good
(that would be me) & the other that carnivorous or omnivorous poo is bad,
only vegetarian poo is good. to me, the latter idea makes no sense - but
anyway, why do you say that?
kylie


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Old 17-04-2007, 03:47 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Posts: 713
Default compost problem

"Stuart Naylor" wrote in message
...

i know there's two schools of thought on poo: one is that all poo is good
(that would be me) & the other that carnivorous or omnivorous poo is bad,
only vegetarian poo is good. to me, the latter idea makes no sense - but
anyway, why do you say that?


In just a few words :-)

Cow manure is considered safe and excellent for compost or direct in
the garden but most dogs receive medications periodically to rid them
of parasites and the medications can also kill compost worms. So first
off there is a withholding period when dog poo can't be added to the
worm farm.


but you can add the poo later after it's sat for a while, if you are
concerned :-) also, medications have changed - this may no longer be true in
all cases. (well, i know horse medications have changed - one would need to
find out concerning dog medication specifically).

If a worm farm is used to compost dog poo then the worm farm needs to
be fed dog poo exclusively otherwise if given a choice they tend to
avoid or ignore the dog poo. Using a worm farm just to compost dog poo
could be considered as a waste of a worm farm.


afaik, the poo-farms are very small, not full-size. my dad had one. (he let
it dry out even after i said it was too dry!! gah!!!) it was probably 50cm
wide by 20cm high by (i don't know) something-similar deep.

When dogs are taken for a walk in the street or down the local park
who knows what bugs they could pick up. Fortunately most things would
be most likely to pass through with their droppings. If their
droppings are dug into the ground as a means of getting rid of them
then the situation could be established where dogs could in future
pick up those same bugs in your own backyard. The same could apply if
the dog poo was added to a compost bin or worm farm, there is no
guarantee that the composting would destroy those bugs so they could
possibly survive composting and eventually still finish up in your
garden.


i tend not to think in those terms, but rather one of creating a balance,
but anyway. (one reason of many i completely gave up on teh Mad Dog
Newsgroup was there were too many people there that were just insane - i
doubt most of them actually wanted their dogs to just be DOGS - they
considered them to be some sort of higher species who needed to be actively
protected from everything on earth and it was just nuts... but sorry, i'm
getting off-track.)

So the local council picks up dog poo here along with my garbage.


thanks for your thoughts :-). where i am at is that i would like it if
people thought once, twice, three times about everything that ends up in
landfill, how it came to be that way, & whether we would need to have
landfill at all if we could just get ourselves together & stop treating the
earth like a rubbish dump. "garbage" is a resource, in the same way that
weeds are merely plants we don't like to see become so successful in our
micro-managed world. if our leavings aren't a genuine resource, i ask myself
what we can do about that, because we need to think about these things.
:-)
kylie




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Old 17-04-2007, 04:55 AM posted to aus.gardens
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Apr 2007
Posts: 9
Default compost problem

You dont have to worry. Nature has ways of disposing of the Human race
if it becomes too successful.
Like in the move "war games, it starts again with a major disaster.


0tterbot wrote:
"Stuart Naylor" wrote in message
...

i know there's two schools of thought on poo: one is that all poo is good
(that would be me) & the other that carnivorous or omnivorous poo is bad,
only vegetarian poo is good. to me, the latter idea makes no sense - but
anyway, why do you say that?

In just a few words :-)

Cow manure is considered safe and excellent for compost or direct in
the garden but most dogs receive medications periodically to rid them
of parasites and the medications can also kill compost worms. So first
off there is a withholding period when dog poo can't be added to the
worm farm.


but you can add the poo later after it's sat for a while, if you are
concerned :-) also, medications have changed - this may no longer be true in
all cases. (well, i know horse medications have changed - one would need to
find out concerning dog medication specifically).

If a worm farm is used to compost dog poo then the worm farm needs to
be fed dog poo exclusively otherwise if given a choice they tend to
avoid or ignore the dog poo. Using a worm farm just to compost dog poo
could be considered as a waste of a worm farm.


afaik, the poo-farms are very small, not full-size. my dad had one. (he let
it dry out even after i said it was too dry!! gah!!!) it was probably 50cm
wide by 20cm high by (i don't know) something-similar deep.

When dogs are taken for a walk in the street or down the local park
who knows what bugs they could pick up. Fortunately most things would
be most likely to pass through with their droppings. If their
droppings are dug into the ground as a means of getting rid of them
then the situation could be established where dogs could in future
pick up those same bugs in your own backyard. The same could apply if
the dog poo was added to a compost bin or worm farm, there is no
guarantee that the composting would destroy those bugs so they could
possibly survive composting and eventually still finish up in your
garden.


i tend not to think in those terms, but rather one of creating a balance,
but anyway. (one reason of many i completely gave up on teh Mad Dog
Newsgroup was there were too many people there that were just insane - i
doubt most of them actually wanted their dogs to just be DOGS - they
considered them to be some sort of higher species who needed to be actively
protected from everything on earth and it was just nuts... but sorry, i'm
getting off-track.)

So the local council picks up dog poo here along with my garbage.


thanks for your thoughts :-). where i am at is that i would like it if
people thought once, twice, three times about everything that ends up in
landfill, how it came to be that way, & whether we would need to have
landfill at all if we could just get ourselves together & stop treating the
earth like a rubbish dump. "garbage" is a resource, in the same way that
weeds are merely plants we don't like to see become so successful in our
micro-managed world. if our leavings aren't a genuine resource, i ask myself
what we can do about that, because we need to think about these things.
:-)
kylie



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Old 17-04-2007, 01:05 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default compost problem

In article ,
"0tterbot" wrote:

thanks for your thoughts :-). where i am at is that i would like it if
people thought once, twice, three times about everything that ends up in
landfill, how it came to be that way, & whether we would need to have
landfill at all if we could just get ourselves together & stop treating the
earth like a rubbish dump. "garbage" is a resource, in the same way that
weeds are merely plants we don't like to see become so successful in our
micro-managed world. if our leavings aren't a genuine resource, i ask myself
what we can do about that, because we need to think about these things.


Big article in the SMH today about the vast amounts of money being made out of
recycling/using waste.

--
Chookie -- Sydney, Australia
(Replace "foulspambegone" with "optushome" to reply)

"Parenthood is like the modern stone washing process for denim jeans. You may
start out crisp, neat and tough, but you end up pale, limp and wrinkled."
Kerry Cue
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Old 19-04-2007, 12:36 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default compost problem


"Stuart Naylor" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 20 Apr 2007 17:38:00 +1000, "FarmI" ask@itshall be given
wrote:

"Stuart Naylor" wrote in message
On Fri, 20 Apr 2007 08:32:06 +1000, "FarmI" ask@itshall be given
wrote:

"0tterbot" wrote in message
"Stuart Naylor" wrote in message

So first off there is a withholding period when dog poo can't be

added
to the worm farm.

but you can add the poo later after it's sat for a while, if you are
concerned :-) also, medications have changed - this may no longer be
true
in all cases. (well, i know horse medications have changed - one

would
need to find out concerning dog medication specifically).

Dog dewormer has the active ingredient called fenbendazole. Compost

worms
are called Eisenia fetida. If you do a google or vivisimo search on

these
two search criteria, I'd be most interested if you can manage to find
anything to worry about. I couldn't.

The medications I'm currently giving to my dogs on a monthly basis
contain praziquartel


Are you sure it isn't praziquantel????? That is the most common

treatment
for dogs in farming areas to prevent tapeworm, specifically the hydatid
tapeworm. It works on most worms but not heartworm AFAIK. Are you in a
farming area?


The labeling on the packet is praziquantel and not praziquartel like I
said previously. I'm in Melbourne's suburbia.

and milbemycin as the active constituents to
prevent heartworm and control all the other worms that usually infest
dogs.


The milbemycin is the heartworm treatment for dogs which return a

negative
test.

The suppliers of worm farms and compost worms suggest a withholding
period of feeding dog poo after dogs have been treated for worms.


I would too if I was selling them. I did notice when I did a search that
this was the recommendation but I couldn't find any scientific info to

back
up their advice. They might be just a bit overcautious but best to be

safe
than sorry especially if there is a chance of wormfarmers using it too

fresh
on leaf veg.

I was told by a very old professional gardener, that dog shit was

brilliant
for fertilising citrus trees. I've never tried it as my dogs poop in the
bushes (except for one of them who was town bred and prefers to do his

tiny
poops at the bottom of the steps. All his stuff goes straight into a

bucket
and then to the tip when there is a bucket full).


My dogs poop on the back lawn but I planted a lemon tree last spring
which is doing very well and the dog pees on it every time he has a
leak.

Putting it under a citrus tree would get it out of the way and not
contaminate anything else I should imagine.


I'm a great believer in recycling and composting to the extent that I
seldom have anything for our council to remove in their weekly
collections. I put the garbage bin out for collection every second or
third week and it usually contains dog poo and little else, so I won't
bother recycling dog poo.


I put dog poop under my hedge, free fertiliser and I need nothing else.

rob


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