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Old 08-01-2008, 11:05 PM posted to aus.gardens
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SG1 wrote:
"Terryc" wrote in message
...
David Hare-Scott wrote:

True. In all the enthusiasm to make the desert bloom humans have
produced
quite a few disasters due to unintended consequences.

And the Ord River Irrigation Scheme is another one unfolding.


Terry
The Ord has been recognised as a disaster for the last 20 years or so. Geese
love rice and any other thing that grows & ya can't shoot the Bs. Leave the
tropics alone and bomb a few cities, drastic but effective.


Whether the Ord river system is a disaster or not remains to be seen.
The problem is how well is it managed and how many fingers are there in
the pie. This is usually the problem when things go wrong. Too many
cooks spoil the broth...

Too many critics when they dont get their way etc.

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Old 09-01-2008, 01:32 AM posted to aus.gardens
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SG1 wrote:

And the Ord River Irrigation Scheme is another one unfolding.



Terry
The Ord has been recognised as a disaster for the last 20 years or so. Geese
love rice and any other thing that grows & ya can't shoot the Bs. Leave the
tropics alone and bomb a few cities, drastic but effective.


I'd forgotten about that bit. Seems they are now having salinity
problems appearing up there as well.


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Old 09-01-2008, 01:35 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Jonno wrote:

Whether the Ord river system is a disaster or not remains to be seen.
The problem is how well is it managed and how many fingers are there in
the pie. This is usually the problem when things go wrong. Too many
cooks spoil the broth...


It is already clear that it is another salinity disaster unfolding. You
can not continually drop extra water onto land without bring soil salts
to the surface. It is just a matter of time.

The Ord also faces a major problem of distance to market. Unless it has
a unique crop, that is a major handicap.




Too many critics when they dont get their way etc.


Oh, are people still farming ostriches?
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Old 09-01-2008, 03:37 AM posted to aus.gardens
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"Terryc" wrote in message
...

Oh, are people still farming ostriches?


Australians all love ostriches
When they are young and free.
We've golden soil
and wealth for toil...........

David


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Old 09-01-2008, 06:46 AM posted to aus.gardens
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"Jonno" wrote in message
SG1 wrote:


The Ord has been recognised as a disaster for the last 20 years or so.
Geese love rice and any other thing that grows & ya can't shoot the Bs.
Leave the tropics alone and bomb a few cities, drastic but effective.


Whether the Ord river system is a disaster or not remains to be seen.


If what the experts say is right, we are already living in a post peak oil
world.

The Ord is build in an area of very low population. When fuel is in short
supply for purposes of both production and transprt of the final product,
the best place to produce food is where there is a population base to whom
the goods are to be sold. The Ord doesn't fit that description so either we
need a massive population shift to near the Ord, or there is a need to
figure out how to get the goods to the population base without using huge
amounts of increasingly expensive fuel.

The Ord is not looking good to be a big success on fuel usage grounds alone.

The problem is how well is it managed and how many fingers are there in
the pie. This is usually the problem when things go wrong. Too many cooks
spoil the broth...


????? I can't follow your thinking here at all. What 'cooks' do you have
in mind? What broth are they spoiling and what do you mean by this comment?

Too many critics when they dont get their way etc.


Unfortunately there are at least 2 classes of critics amongst the general
populace. There is the mindless crowd that seems to be most vocal and is
generally made up of the really dumb Joe Public who simply whinges, talks to
John Laws or Alan Jones or the varous other State shock jocks and is totally
clueless. Those who carried on about Chapelle Corby were this type of
person. Then there are another sort of critic who actually uses their head
and trys to gather information, does some analysis and then makes up their
mind. I think that we are blessed with too many of the former and too few
of the latter.




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Old 09-01-2008, 07:17 AM posted to aus.gardens
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FarmI wrote:
"Jonno" wrote in message
SG1 wrote:


The Ord has been recognised as a disaster for the last 20 years or so.
Geese love rice and any other thing that grows & ya can't shoot the Bs.
Leave the tropics alone and bomb a few cities, drastic but effective.


Whether the Ord river system is a disaster or not remains to be seen.


If what the experts say is right, we are already living in a post peak oil
world.

The Ord is build in an area of very low population. When fuel is in short
supply for purposes of both production and transprt of the final product,
the best place to produce food is where there is a population base to whom
the goods are to be sold. The Ord doesn't fit that description so either we
need a massive population shift to near the Ord, or there is a need to
figure out how to get the goods to the population base without using huge
amounts of increasingly expensive fuel.

The Ord is not looking good to be a big success on fuel usage grounds alone.

The problem is how well is it managed and how many fingers are there in
the pie. This is usually the problem when things go wrong. Too many cooks
spoil the broth...


????? I can't follow your thinking here at all. What 'cooks' do you have
in mind? What broth are they spoiling and what do you mean by this comment?

Too many critics when they dont get their way etc.


Unfortunately there are at least 2 classes of critics amongst the general
populace. There is the mindless crowd that seems to be most vocal and is
generally made up of the really dumb Joe Public who simply whinges, talks to
John Laws or Alan Jones or the varous other State shock jocks and is totally
clueless. Those who carried on about Chapelle Corby were this type of
person. Then there are another sort of critic who actually uses their head
and trys to gather information, does some analysis and then makes up their
mind. I think that we are blessed with too many of the former and too few
of the latter.




Hmm I reckon Bernard Shaw saw it right when he said “Two percent of the
people think; three percent of the people think they think; and
ninety-five percent of the people would rather die than think.”

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Old 09-01-2008, 07:54 AM posted to aus.gardens
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FarmI wrote:
"Jonno" wrote in message
SG1 wrote:


The Ord has been recognised as a disaster for the last 20 years or so.
Geese love rice and any other thing that grows & ya can't shoot the Bs.
Leave the tropics alone and bomb a few cities, drastic but effective.


Whether the Ord river system is a disaster or not remains to be seen.


If what the experts say is right, we are already living in a post peak oil
world.

The Ord is build in an area of very low population. When fuel is in short
supply for purposes of both production and transprt of the final product,
the best place to produce food is where there is a population base to whom
the goods are to be sold. The Ord doesn't fit that description so either we
need a massive population shift to near the Ord, or there is a need to
figure out how to get the goods to the population base without using huge
amounts of increasingly expensive fuel.

The Ord is not looking good to be a big success on fuel usage grounds alone.


I dont know if fuel is the problem, as a large amount of food is shipped
world

wide and still manages to make a tidy profit.

The technological problem of salts is one that can be overcome but costs
there may create a similar problem as in Mildura. They're also
surviving. Just!

The problem is how well is it managed and how many fingers are there in
the pie. This is usually the problem when things go wrong. Too many cooks
spoil the broth...



????? I can't follow your thinking here at all. What 'cooks' do you have
in mind? What broth are they spoiling and what do you mean by this comment?


Its hyperthetical. If you have too many people involved in corruption or
"cooks",

the brew, in this case the Ord river system, doesnt get the proper
attention to detail,

and spoils the broth or the outcome for that particular situation or
project.

Usually this happens because of ill will towards each other.

The "cooks" get quite spiteful if they dont get their won way, to thew
point of

sabotaging a system. I think political influence has something to do
with it.

I hope thats not too hard for you...
Too many critics when they dont get their way etc.


Unfortunately there are at least 2 classes of critics amongst the general
populace. There is the mindless crowd that seems to be most vocal and is
generally made up of the really dumb Joe Public who simply whinges, talks to
John Laws or Alan Jones or the varous other State shock jocks and is totally
clueless. Those who carried on about Chapelle Corby were this type of
person. Then there are another sort of critic who actually uses their head
and trys to gather information, does some analysis and then makes up their
mind. I think that we are blessed with too many of the former and too few
of the latter.


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Old 09-01-2008, 07:57 AM posted to aus.gardens
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"Terryc" wrote in message
news:47839209$0$28599

lol, are you looking at the same map that tourists look at?


No, the Australia 1:5000000 General Reference Map Third Edition.

Big water pipe schemes have been done before. Notably in 1905, the Perth to
Kalgoorlie pipe system by Charles Yelverton O'Connor. O'Connor and his pipe
system got a fair bit of criticism- but it was completed and it works.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C._Y._O'Connor


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Old 09-01-2008, 09:39 AM posted to aus.gardens
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"Jonno" wrote in message
FarmI wrote:


Unfortunately there are at least 2 classes of critics amongst the general
populace. There is the mindless crowd that seems to be most vocal and is
generally made up of the really dumb Joe Public who simply whinges, talks
to John Laws or Alan Jones or the varous other State shock jocks and is
totally clueless. Those who carried on about Chapelle Corby were this
type of person. Then there are another sort of critic who actually uses
their head and trys to gather information, does some analysis and then
makes up their mind. I think that we are blessed with too many of the
former and too few of the latter.


Hmm I reckon Bernard Shaw saw it right when he said “Two percent of the
people think; three percent of the people think they think; and
ninety-five percent of the people would rather die than think.”


Oooh lovely! I saw a good one liner yesterday:
"Your best side! You're sitting on it!"


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Old 09-01-2008, 09:41 AM posted to aus.gardens
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FarmI wrote:
"Jonno" wrote in message
SG1 wrote:


The Ord has been recognised as a disaster for the last 20 years or so.
Geese love rice and any other thing that grows & ya can't shoot the Bs.
Leave the tropics alone and bomb a few cities, drastic but effective.


Whether the Ord river system is a disaster or not remains to be seen.


If what the experts say is right, we are already living in a post peak oil
world.

The Ord is build in an area of very low population. When fuel is in short
supply for purposes of both production and transprt of the final product,
the best place to produce food is where there is a population base to whom
the goods are to be sold. The Ord doesn't fit that description so either we
need a massive population shift to near the Ord, or there is a need to
figure out how to get the goods to the population base without using huge
amounts of increasingly expensive fuel.

The Ord is not looking good to be a big success on fuel usage grounds alone.

The problem is how well is it managed and how many fingers are there in
the pie. This is usually the problem when things go wrong. Too many cooks
spoil the broth...


????? I can't follow your thinking here at all. What 'cooks' do you have
in mind? What broth are they spoiling and what do you mean by this comment?

Its hyperthetical. If you have too many people involved in corruption or
"cooks",

"the broth", in this case the Ord river system, doesnt get the proper
attention to detail,

and spoils "the broth" or the outcome for that particular situation or
project.

Usually this happens because of ill will towards each other.

The "cooks" get quite spiteful if they dont get their own way, to the
point of

sabotaging a system. I think political influence/inteference for their
own means has something to do with it.

I hope this explains it., and isnt too hard for you to follow....


Too many critics when they dont get their way etc.


Unfortunately there are at least 2 classes of critics amongst the general
populace. There is the mindless crowd that seems to be most vocal and is
generally made up of the really dumb Joe Public who simply whinges, talks to
John Laws or Alan Jones or the varous other State shock jocks and is totally
clueless. Those who carried on about Chapelle Corby were this type of
person. Then there are another sort of critic who actually uses their head
and trys to gather information, does some analysis and then makes up their
mind. I think that we are blessed with too many of the former and too few
of the latter.




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Old 09-01-2008, 09:42 AM posted to aus.gardens
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FarmI wrote:
"Jonno" wrote in message
FarmI wrote:


Unfortunately there are at least 2 classes of critics amongst the general
populace. There is the mindless crowd that seems to be most vocal and is
generally made up of the really dumb Joe Public who simply whinges, talks
to John Laws or Alan Jones or the varous other State shock jocks and is
totally clueless. Those who carried on about Chapelle Corby were this
type of person. Then there are another sort of critic who actually uses
their head and trys to gather information, does some analysis and then
makes up their mind. I think that we are blessed with too many of the
former and too few of the latter.


Hmm I reckon Bernard Shaw saw it right when he said “Two percent of the
people think; three percent of the people think they think; and
ninety-five percent of the people would rather die than think.”


Oooh lovely! I saw a good one liner yesterday:
"Your best side! You're sitting on it!"


Could be the part youre thinking with?
  #42   Report Post  
Old 09-01-2008, 10:55 AM posted to aus.gardens
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FarmI wrote:
"Jonno" wrote in message
FarmI wrote:


Unfortunately there are at least 2 classes of critics amongst the general
populace. There is the mindless crowd that seems to be most vocal and is
generally made up of the really dumb Joe Public who simply whinges, talks
to John Laws or Alan Jones or the varous other State shock jocks and is
totally clueless. Those who carried on about Chapelle Corby were this
type of person. Then there are another sort of critic who actually uses
their head and trys to gather information, does some analysis and then
makes up their mind. I think that we are blessed with too many of the
former and too few of the latter.


Hmm I reckon Bernard Shaw saw it right when he said “Two percent of the
people think; three percent of the people think they think; and
ninety-five percent of the people would rather die than think.”


Oooh lovely! I saw a good one liner yesterday:
"Your best side! You're sitting on it!"



He also said "The reasonable man adapts himself to the world.

The unreasonable man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself.

All progress, therefore, depends upon the unreasonable man."

It still depends on how smart he is...
  #43   Report Post  
Old 09-01-2008, 11:22 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Jonno wrote:
FarmI wrote:
"Jonno" wrote in message
FarmI wrote:


Unfortunately there are at least 2 classes of critics amongst the
general populace. There is the mindless crowd that seems to be most
vocal and is generally made up of the really dumb Joe Public who
simply whinges, talks to John Laws or Alan Jones or the varous other
State shock jocks and is totally clueless. Those who carried on
about Chapelle Corby were this type of person. Then there are
another sort of critic who actually uses their head and trys to
gather information, does some analysis and then makes up their
mind. I think that we are blessed with too many of the former and
too few of the latter.


Hmm I reckon Bernard Shaw saw it right when he said “Two percent of
the people think; three percent of the people think they think; and
ninety-five percent of the people would rather die than think.”


Oooh lovely! I saw a good one liner yesterday:
"Your best side! You're sitting on it!"

Maybe some of us are thinking with it as welll
  #44   Report Post  
Old 09-01-2008, 12:19 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Jonno wrote:
Jonno wrote:
FarmI wrote:
"Jonno" wrote in message
FarmI wrote:

Unfortunately there are at least 2 classes of critics amongst the
general populace. There is the mindless crowd that seems to be
most vocal and is generally made up of the really dumb Joe Public
who simply whinges, talks to John Laws or Alan Jones or the varous
other State shock jocks and is totally clueless. Those who carried
on about Chapelle Corby were this type of person. Then there are
another sort of critic who actually uses their head and trys to
gather information, does some analysis and then makes up their
mind. I think that we are blessed with too many of the former and
too few of the latter.

Hmm I reckon Bernard Shaw saw it right when he said “Two percent of
the people think; three percent of the people think they think; and
ninety-five percent of the people would rather die than think.”

Oooh lovely! I saw a good one liner yesterday:
"Your best side! You're sitting on it!"

Maybe some of us are thinking with it as welll


That is we think with our ass. Or impolitely ars
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Old 10-01-2008, 07:08 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Aquaducts - irrigating Australia

Blackadder XXIV wrote:
"Terryc" wrote in message
news:47839209$0$28599


lol, are you looking at the same map that tourists look at?



No, the Australia 1:5000000 General Reference Map Third Edition.


Lots of phantom rivers.

Big water pipe schemes have been done before. Notably in 1905, the Perth to
Kalgoorlie pipe system by Charles Yelverton O'Connor. O'Connor and his pipe
system got a fair bit of criticism- but it was completed and it works.


A big water scheme, then there is the Snowy, but that is about it.
Minor distances really.


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