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Old 05-02-2003, 04:49 PM
Dan
 
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Default Organic rose program

I would like to go all organic this year with my roses. I planted a
"Princess Diana" hybrid tea, and moved two three year old "Veteran's
Honor" hybrid teas to a raised bed that I prepared using about half
existing
black and white clay soil,(yuk),the other half leaves, bagged manure and
compost tilled in. The bed is about 2 feet deep and gets a good 8+ hours
sun a day.
The plan is to foliar feed with
seaweed extract and
compost tea with a bit of garlic mixed in every week during the growing
season. Questions are - Will foliar feeding with these three ingredients
help keep insects and disease under control or is there something else
to add? What organic fertilizer should I use to fertilize the first
time in March,and
after first flush to give them the boost they need?

Dan J.
Zone 7b
Dallas TX

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Old 05-02-2003, 06:31 PM
animaux
 
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Default Organic rose program

On Wed, 05 Feb 2003 15:49:29 GMT, Dan wrote:

I would like to go all organic this year with my roses. I planted a
"Princess Diana" hybrid tea, and moved two three year old "Veteran's
Honor" hybrid teas to a raised bed that I prepared using about half
existing
black and white clay soil,(yuk),the other half leaves, bagged manure and
compost tilled in. The bed is about 2 feet deep and gets a good 8+ hours
sun a day.
The plan is to foliar feed with
seaweed extract and
compost tea with a bit of garlic mixed in every week during the growing
season. Questions are - Will foliar feeding with these three ingredients
help keep insects and disease under control or is there something else
to add? What organic fertilizer should I use to fertilize the first
time in March,and
after first flush to give them the boost they need?

Dan J.
Zone 7b
Dallas TX


ORGANIC ROSE PROGRAM



Roses should only be grown organically since they are one of the best medicinal
and culinary herbs in the world. When they are loaded with toxic pesticides and
other chemicals, that use is gone, or at least it should be. Drinking rose hip
tea or using rose petals in teas or salads after spraying the plants with
synthetic poisons is a really bad idea. For best results with roses, here's the
program:



SELECTION:
Buy and plant adapted roses such as antiques, David Austins and well-proven
hybrids. The old roses will have the largest and most vitamin C filled hips.
Rosa rugosa roses have the most vitamin C.



PLANTING:
Prepare beds by mixing the following into existing soil to form a raised bed: 6
compost, lava sand, of decomposed granite, 30 lbs. of wheat/corn/molasses
soil amendment, 20 lbs. of sul-po-mag, per 1,000 sq. ft. Soak the bare roots or
rootball in water with 1 tablespoon of seaweed per gallon. Settle soil around
plants with water - no tamping.



MULCHING:
After planting, cover all the soil in the beds with one inch of compost or
earthworm castings followed by 2-3" of shredded native cedar. Do not pile the
mulch up on the stems of the roses.



WATERING:
If possible, save and use rainwater. If not, add 1 tablespoon of apple cider
vinegar and 1oz liquid humate per gallon of water. If all that fails, just use
tap water but don't over water. Avoid using salty well water.



FEEDING SCHEDULE



Round #1

February 1-15 - organic fertilizer @ 20 lbs./1,000 sq. ft., lava sand at 80
lbs./1,000 sq. ft., and horticultural cornmeal at 10 -20 lbs./1,000 sq. ft.


Round #2

June 1-15 - organic fertilizer @ 20 lbs./1,000 sq. ft, Texas greensand @ 40
lbs./1,000 sq. ft. or soft rock phosphate at 30 lbs./1,000 sq. ft. if in acid
soil areas.


Round #3

September 15-30 - organic fertilizer @ 20 lbs./1,000 sq. ft., sul-po-mag @ 20
lbs./1,000 sq. ft Apply wheat/corn/molasses soil amendment at 30lbs./1,000 sq.
ft.



Foliar Feed with Garrett Juice twice monthly.

I found this at www.dirtdoctor.com

The recipe for Garrett Juice is also on that site, and he is on the radio in
Dallas on Saturday 11a till noon, and Sunday 8a till noon.
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Old 07-02-2003, 05:31 AM
Sunflower
 
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Default Organic rose program


"Dan" wrote in message
...
I would like to go all organic this year with my roses. I planted a
"Princess Diana" hybrid tea, and moved two three year old "Veteran's
Honor" hybrid teas to a raised bed that I prepared using about half
existing
black and white clay soil,(yuk),the other half leaves, bagged manure and
compost tilled in. The bed is about 2 feet deep and gets a good 8+ hours
sun a day.
The plan is to foliar feed with
seaweed extract and
compost tea with a bit of garlic mixed in every week during the growing
season. Questions are - Will foliar feeding with these three ingredients
help keep insects and disease under control or is there something else
to add? What organic fertilizer should I use to fertilize the first
time in March,and
after first flush to give them the boost they need?

Dan J.
Zone 7b
Dallas TX


Your program will make little difference in the rose succumbing to black
spot. Chemical controls provide the only consistant control of that fungal
pest for rosarians in humid climates because most choose to grow roses that
are unsuited to being grown without that life support. Hybrid tea roses are
very prone to black spot in any part of the US that has a significant
humidity level. That includes East Texas. Organic remedies work best in a
less high pressure disease environment of less humidity or a shorter growing
season. They are virtually ineffective against black spot in a warm and
humid environment with a long growing season. If you want to grow roses
organically in your garden, then you had best choose roses that will not
need spraying in order to survive. China, tea, and noisette roses will
provide season long blooms and are far more resistant to disease than are
the modern hybrid teas, and they are incredibly suited to Southern gardens.
Take a look at Chamblee's www.chambleeroses.com/ or Antique Rose Emporium
www.antiqueroseemporium.com/ for roses in each of these categories.

The most important determinant to garden success is to choose plants that
are suited to the climate. Growing hybrid teas is an exercise in
frustration unless you are willing to regularly spray them.(Excepting all
those who live in dry air environments and don't also have problems with
mildew.)

Sunflower
MS 7b





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