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Old 05-02-2008, 04:53 PM posted to rec.gardens, triangle.gardens, alt.home.lawn.garden,bionet.agroforestry, rec.woodworking
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Default ~2000 Paulownia seeds for $10.00

We've been growing Paulownia for over 20 years!

We have plenty of stock and plenty of fertile seeds!


http://paulownia.iscool.net



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Old 05-02-2008, 05:47 PM posted to rec.gardens,triangle.gardens,alt.home.lawn.garden,bionet.agroforestry,rec.woodworking
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Default ~2000 Paulownia seeds for $10.00

wrote:
We've been growing Paulownia for over 20 years!

We have plenty of stock and plenty of fertile seeds!


http://paulownia.iscool.net



Why do you keep trying to sell weed seeds? I'm sure everyone already has
all the weeds they need.

--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
http://johnmcgaw.com
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Old 05-02-2008, 08:09 PM posted to rec.gardens,triangle.gardens,alt.home.lawn.garden,bionet.agroforestry,rec.woodworking
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Default ~2000 Paulownia seeds for $10.00

John McGaw wrote:
wrote:
We've been growing Paulownia for over 20 years!

We have plenty of stock and plenty of fertile seeds!


http://paulownia.iscool.net



Why do you keep trying to sell weed seeds? I'm sure everyone already
has all the weeds they need.


Not to be siding with a spammer but it's apparently traditional for
some applications in Japan.

--
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)


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Old 05-02-2008, 08:16 PM posted to rec.gardens, triangle.gardens, alt.home.lawn.garden,bionet.agroforestry, rec.woodworking
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Default ~2000 Paulownia seeds for $10.00

On 5 Feb, 17:47, John McGaw wrote:

http://paulownia.iscool.net


Why do you keep trying to sell weed seeds? I'm sure everyone already has
all the weeds they need.


Well I'd love to grow Paulownia, but when I looked at the weather
conditions for my plot (in _Wales_ of all places) it just didn't have
the water to support the things. 8-(
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Old 05-02-2008, 11:56 PM posted to rec.gardens,triangle.gardens,alt.home.lawn.garden,bionet.agroforestry,rec.woodworking
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Default ~2000 Paulownia seeds for $10.00

On Tue, 5 Feb 2008 15:09:34 -0500, "J. Clarke"
wrote:

Not to be siding with a spammer but it's apparently traditional for
some applications in Japan.


Not AFAIK, but it's the closest Western substitute for the traditional
timber. This is one of the reasons why I wanted to grow Paulownia.


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Old 06-02-2008, 01:54 AM posted to rec.gardens,triangle.gardens,alt.home.lawn.garden,bionet.agroforestry,rec.woodworking
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Default ~2000 Paulownia seeds for $10.00

Andy Dingley wrote:
On Tue, 5 Feb 2008 15:09:34 -0500, "J. Clarke"
wrote:

Not to be siding with a spammer but it's apparently traditional for
some applications in Japan.


Not AFAIK, but it's the closest Western substitute for the
traditional
timber. This is one of the reasons why I wanted to grow Paulownia.


Paulownia isn't "western". It's native to Asia including Japan.

Here's a research paper from Japan on the subject:
http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/...4_361/_article

Unfortunately, everything but the abstract is in Japanese.

--
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)


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Old 06-02-2008, 02:02 AM posted to rec.gardens, triangle.gardens, alt.home.lawn.garden,bionet.agroforestry, rec.woodworking
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Default ~2000 Paulownia seeds for $10.00

On Feb 5, 12:47*pm, John McGaw wrote:
wrote:
We've been growing Paulownia for over 20 years!


We have plenty of stock and plenty of fertile seeds!


http://paulownia.iscool.net


Why do you keep trying to sell weed seeds? I'm sure everyone already has
all the weeds they need.

Oh, I don't know.... maybe a little research might change your mind.
It sounds like a nice material for casework, very much like poplar.

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Old 06-02-2008, 06:01 PM posted to rec.gardens,triangle.gardens,alt.home.lawn.garden,bionet.agroforestry,rec.woodworking
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Default ~2000 Paulownia seeds for $10.00

Andy Dingley wrote:
On 5 Feb, 17:47, John McGaw wrote:

http://paulownia.iscool.net

Why do you keep trying to sell weed seeds? I'm sure everyone already has
all the weeds they need.


Well I'd love to grow Paulownia, but when I looked at the weather
conditions for my plot (in _Wales_ of all places) it just didn't have
the water to support the things. 8-(


If you were to plant one, something I strongly advise against, you might
be surprised. These weeds were introduced to some areas to control
erosion in abandoned strip mines and have escaped into the wild. Around
here, especially up toward the Kentucky border I can find them growing
with great abandon out of solid rock faces in highway cuts and in mounds
of shale overburden where the only water is poison to everything else.
These are undemanding plants. If dandelion were a tree it would be
paulownia. I'd bet that you couldn't find a toxic wasteland surrounding
an abandoned lead mine in Wales where paulownia wouldn't survive

--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
http://johnmcgaw.com
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Old 06-02-2008, 06:13 PM posted to rec.gardens,triangle.gardens,alt.home.lawn.garden,bionet.agroforestry,rec.woodworking
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Default ~2000 Paulownia seeds for $10.00

Robatoy wrote:
On Feb 5, 12:47 pm, John McGaw wrote:
wrote:
We've been growing Paulownia for over 20 years!
We have plenty of stock and plenty of fertile seeds!
http://paulownia.iscool.net

Why do you keep trying to sell weed seeds? I'm sure everyone already has
all the weeds they need.

Oh, I don't know.... maybe a little research might change your mind.
It sounds like a nice material for casework, very much like poplar.


Have you ever actually worked with US-grown paulownia? I have. It is far
closer to balsa than it is to poplar -- soft and porous and light. The
paulownia that is favored in Japan for tansu is much different, not in
species but in growing conditions. They harvest slow-growing wood from
the mountains. But even in Japan paulownia was favored in some
specialized niches, not for general furniture building. For example it
was used for interior compartments in sea chests because the wood would
swell if it got wet and effectively seal the lid protecting the contents
of that compartment. Tansu was far more likely to be made of pine,
cryptomeria, cypress, or chestnut. And paulownia, if present at all,
would be for interior dividers and such. From what I've read, US-farmed
paulownia is considered inferior in Japan and seems to wind up as a
filler in plywood when it is used at all.

All in all, around here it is a nasty weed which spreads almost
uncontrollably and I see no reason to change that opinion.

--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
http://johnmcgaw.com
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Old 06-02-2008, 06:47 PM posted to rec.gardens, triangle.gardens, alt.home.lawn.garden,bionet.agroforestry, rec.woodworking
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Default ~2000 Paulownia seeds for $10.00

On Feb 6, 1:13*pm, John McGaw wrote:
Robatoy wrote:
On Feb 5, 12:47 pm, John McGaw wrote:
wrote:
We've been growing Paulownia for over 20 years!
We have plenty of stock and plenty of fertile seeds!
http://paulownia.iscool.net
Why do you keep trying to sell weed seeds? I'm sure everyone already has
all the weeds they need.


Oh, I don't know.... maybe a little research might change your mind.
It sounds like a nice material for casework, very much like poplar.


Have you ever actually worked with US-grown paulownia? I have. It is far
closer to balsa than it is to poplar -- soft and porous and light. The
paulownia that is favored in Japan for tansu is much different, not in
species but in growing conditions. They harvest slow-growing wood from
the mountains. But even in Japan paulownia was favored in some
specialized niches, not for general furniture building. For example it
was used for interior compartments in sea chests because the wood would
swell if it got wet and effectively seal the lid protecting the contents
of that compartment. Tansu was far more likely to be made of pine,
cryptomeria, cypress, or chestnut. And paulownia, if present at all,
would be for interior dividers and such. From what I've read, US-farmed
paulownia is considered inferior in Japan and seems to wind up as a
filler in plywood *when it is used at all.

All in all, around here it is a nasty weed which spreads almost
uncontrollably and I see no reason to change that opinion.

--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]http://johnmcgaw.com


There you go, a little research changed my mind too. We have 'weed'
trees here like Chinese Elm and Manitoba Maple.
They are a nuisance. Paulownia seems to fit that bill, at least for
these parts of the planet.
Thanks for the info.

r


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Old 07-02-2008, 01:35 PM posted to rec.gardens,triangle.gardens,alt.home.lawn.garden,bionet.agroforestry,rec.woodworking
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Default ~2000 Paulownia seeds for $10.00

In article
,
Andy Dingley wrote:

On 5 Feb, 17:47, John McGaw wrote:

http://paulownia.iscool.net


Why do you keep trying to sell weed seeds? I'm sure everyone already has
all the weeds they need.


Well I'd love to grow Paulownia, but when I looked at the weather
conditions for my plot (in _Wales_ of all places) it just didn't have
the water to support the things. 8-(


I'm surprised, they grow well in the climate where I live, which is
wetter washington. They don't handle freezing weather at all well (nor
heavy winds either, lost one this fall to heavy winds)

--
--------------------------------------------------------
Personal e-mail is the n7bsn but at amsat.org
This posting address is a spam-trap and seldom read
RV and Camping FAQ can be found at
http://www.ralphandellen.us/rv
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Old 07-02-2008, 07:41 PM posted to rec.gardens, triangle.gardens, alt.home.lawn.garden,bionet.agroforestry, rec.woodworking
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Default ~2000 Paulownia seeds for $10.00

Have you ever actually worked with US-grown paulownia? I have. It is far
closer to balsa than it is to poplar -- soft and porous and light. The
paulownia that is favored in Japan for tansu is much different, not in
species but in growing conditions. They harvest slow-growing wood from
the mountains. But even in Japan paulownia was favored in some
specialized niches, not for general furniture building. For example it
was used for interior compartments in sea chests because the wood would
swell if it got wet and effectively seal the lid protecting the contents
of that compartment. Tansu was far more likely to be made of pine,
cryptomeria, cypress, or chestnut. And paulownia, if present at all,
would be for interior dividers and such. From what I've read, US-farmed
paulownia is considered inferior in Japan and seems to wind up as a
filler in plywood *when it is used at all.


Reminds me of a conversation I had about 15 years ago with an emu
farmer. He went on at length about the unique virtues of that large
flightless bird.

"You can use every part of the bird. The meat is delicious and very
healthy, and they make this oil that is highly prized in the perfume
industry, and even the feathers are used to make fishing lures and
ladies hats."

I asked him how much a bird was worth.

"I get three thousand dollars for a breeding pair!"

"But how much does a bird bring for slaughter?"

"Oh, nobody's slaughtering any yet, 'cause they're too valuable. But
once the grower's market is filled, they'll be worth about five
hundred dollars a bird."

A few years after that, I saw several articles in the newspaper about
the problem emus caused when farmers simply turned them loose rather
than continue to feed them. When the grower's market was saturated
there was no other market.

I predict the paulownia tree will be the emu of the plant kingdom.

DonkeyHody
"Even an old blind hog finds an acorn every now and then."

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Old 07-02-2008, 08:16 PM posted to rec.gardens,triangle.gardens,alt.home.lawn.garden,bionet.agroforestry,rec.woodworking
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Default ~2000 Paulownia seeds for $10.00

DonkeyHody wrote:
Have you ever actually worked with US-grown paulownia? I have. It
is
far closer to balsa than it is to poplar -- soft and porous and
light. The paulownia that is favored in Japan for tansu is much
different, not in species but in growing conditions. They harvest
slow-growing wood from the mountains. But even in Japan paulownia
was favored in some specialized niches, not for general furniture
building. For example it was used for interior compartments in sea
chests because the wood would swell if it got wet and effectively
seal the lid protecting the contents of that compartment. Tansu was
far more likely to be made of pine, cryptomeria, cypress, or
chestnut. And paulownia, if present at all, would be for interior
dividers and such. From what I've read, US-farmed paulownia is
considered inferior in Japan and seems to wind up as a filler in
plywood when it is used at all.


Reminds me of a conversation I had about 15 years ago with an emu
farmer. He went on at length about the unique virtues of that large
flightless bird.

"You can use every part of the bird. The meat is delicious and very
healthy, and they make this oil that is highly prized in the perfume
industry, and even the feathers are used to make fishing lures and
ladies hats."

I asked him how much a bird was worth.

"I get three thousand dollars for a breeding pair!"

"But how much does a bird bring for slaughter?"

"Oh, nobody's slaughtering any yet, 'cause they're too valuable.
But
once the grower's market is filled, they'll be worth about five
hundred dollars a bird."

A few years after that, I saw several articles in the newspaper
about
the problem emus caused when farmers simply turned them loose rather
than continue to feed them. When the grower's market was saturated
there was no other market.

I predict the paulownia tree will be the emu of the plant kingdom.


If one has visions of planting paulownia and getting rich selling the
timber, that appears to be most likely the case. Seems to be
interesting in its own right though--I've got a spot in my yard where
there used to be a dogwood that gave up the ghost after the kid who
used to mow the lawn whacked the bark off it one too mamy times with
the lawn mower. I'm tempted to put a Paulownia there--let's see ya
kill _that_, kid.


DonkeyHody
"Even an old blind hog finds an acorn every now and then."


--
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
(was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)


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Old 10-03-2008, 09:13 PM posted to rec.gardens,triangle.gardens,alt.home.lawn.garden,bionet.agroforestry,rec.woodworking
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Default ~2000 Paulownia seeds for $10.00


"Jangchub" wrote in message
news
On Sat, 8 Mar 2008 17:05:24 -0700, "Alexander SuperTramp"
wrote:


"Jangchub" wrote in message
. ..
On 08 Mar 2008 00:26:44 GMT, wrote:

On 2008-02-05, Andy Dingley wrote:
On Tue, 5 Feb 2008 15:09:34 -0500, "J. Clarke"

wrote:

Not to be siding with a spammer but it's apparently traditional for
some applications in Japan.

Not AFAIK, but it's the closest Western substitute for the traditional
timber. This is one of the reasons why I wanted to grow Paulownia.

Timber!?!?!?!!? It is a damn invasive weed of a tree. I have
seen many but none ever qualify as timber, just as kudzu with a
trunk.

Paulownia is grown in many places as it indeed is a hardwood and it is
used frequently for framing, flooring, etc. I have one growing in the
yard. It grew to 25 feet in two years. I have the P. kawasaki which
is much less invasive and is truly beautiful. Shit, I should start
selling them, I have enough seeds t populate China.


What is it that makes these tree so invasive?
The fact that they produce s many seeds that then grow so quickly?
Has anyone ever tird to bonsai one of these?

Janchub: How much for 50 or so of the seeds from yours?


The invasive species of this plant are so because they do grow rapidly
and multiply pushing out native species. P.kawasaki is not invasive,
that I can tell, nor have I found in the reading I've done on
Paulownia. Certain species germinate more rapidly.

If I go out there and capture the seeds you want, I won't sell them.
I'll either give them to you or make a trade if you have any
daylillies. I'm starting to become a daylily collector and I love
them. If you don't have any, no worries. Just email me your address
and I'll send you some.


Thanks ! email sent with P.kawasaki in the subject line.




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