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Old 06-09-2010, 09:25 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Dig them up and burn them?

On Mon, 6 Sep 2010 21:00:40 +0100, Roger Tonkin
wrote:

In article ,
says...

Advice on how to deal with tomato blight seems to be to dig up and burn
infected plants.

Has anyone tried to set fire to a tomato?

Presumably if you dry the infected plants and fruit before burning them this
gives plenty of opportunity for the infection to be spread.
And also takes a very long time in this weather.

Not having an incinerator or a flame thrower I am not sure how to proceed.

Cheers

Dave R


Bundle them up in a black bin bag and take them to your local council
waste recycling centre. Most seem to have garden waste recycling bins
nowadays.


Whoa there neddy! The RHS recommend burying or burning; they say
"don't compost". If there's a danger in adding blighted
tomatoes/potatoes to your compost heap, might there not be a similar
danger in adding them to the green skip at your local tip? Someone
might well end up with the compost product.

It may not be "green" but may be better to bag it up and put it into
the "non-recyclable" skip along with general rubbish.
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Old 06-09-2010, 09:44 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Dig them up and burn them?

In article ,
Jake wrote:

Whoa there neddy! The RHS recommend burying or burning; they say
"don't compost". If there's a danger in adding blighted
tomatoes/potatoes to your compost heap, might there not be a similar
danger in adding them to the green skip at your local tip? Someone
might well end up with the compost product.


That is true. What isn't is the advice. It's crap.

In the UK, blight does not current form viable, durable spores, and
is transmitted over the winter ONLY in live plants. Composting
blighted material is perfectly safe. There are some very solid
reasons for this - they may not remain true forever, but composting
will not change when and if it ceases to be the case.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 06-09-2010, 10:27 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Dig them up and burn them?

On 6 Sep, 21:44, wrote:
In article ,

Jake wrote:

Whoa there neddy! The RHS recommend burying or burning; they say
"don't compost". If there's a danger in adding blighted
tomatoes/potatoes to your compost heap, might there not be a similar
danger in adding them to the green skip at your local tip? Someone
might well end up with the compost product.


That is true. *What isn't is the advice. *It's crap.

In the UK, blight does not current form viable, durable spores, and
is transmitted over the winter ONLY in live plants. *Composting
blighted material is perfectly safe. *There are some very solid
reasons for this - they may not remain true forever, but composting
will not change when and if it ceases to be the case.

Regards,
Nick Maclaren.


If you have a good fire going then you can burn the old tomato plants
a few at the time, and you can always use some old cooking oil to
boost the fire.
This atitude of taking any plant material that has died or is infected
by who knows what to the council recycling depot so it can come back
to un suspecting gardeners at a later date.
I'm sure that even though they get to higher temp. than you or I can
get in our heaps I am sure that there are some things that wont be
killed.
Also what a good way to get rid of your grass clipings after you have
treated your lavn with weed killer.
Happy gardening everyone.
David Hill
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Old 06-09-2010, 10:37 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Dig them up and burn them?



Nick wrote

Jake wrote:

Whoa there neddy! The RHS recommend burying or burning; they say
"don't compost". If there's a danger in adding blighted
tomatoes/potatoes to your compost heap, might there not be a similar
danger in adding them to the green skip at your local tip? Someone
might well end up with the compost product.


That is true. What isn't is the advice. It's crap.

In the UK, blight does not current form viable, durable spores, and
is transmitted over the winter ONLY in live plants. Composting
blighted material is perfectly safe. There are some very solid
reasons for this - they may not remain true forever, but composting
will not change when and if it ceases to be the case.

Quite, I compost my blighted Tomato and Potato plants if I get any and
always have done, never caused me a problem the following year. The only
thing I will take to the dump is actual blighted potatoes and I don't put
them in the green waste recycling either they go in the general waste. (as
instructed by the operatives)

--
Regards
Bob Hobden
W.of London. UK



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Old 07-09-2010, 02:38 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Dig them up and burn them?

In article ,
Martin Brown wrote:

I wouldn't be too keen to add onion white rot to my heap - even though I
can get it up to quite a high temperature most years. Anything else I
consider fair game though I will burn blighted plants if I happen to
have a fire I have never been sure that the smoke isn't capable of
spreading the infective agent as spores.


White rot is very different but, in most gardens, the soil either has
it or does not - in mine it does, so the allium vegetables are a
waste of time. Chives and decorative ones seem OK.

The smoke can certainly spread spores, but I don't know which will
survive it.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 10-09-2010, 01:51 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Dig them up and burn them?

In article , Jake
writes
It may not be "green" but may be better to bag it up and put it into
the "non-recyclable" skip along with general rubbish.



Try telling that to at least two people I've seen recently at the tip
putting blighted stuff on he green waste! Too late to recall it as both
times the stuff had already been dumped into the containers.
--
Janet Tweedy
Dalmatian Telegraph
http://www.lancedal.demon.co.uk
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Old 10-09-2010, 08:14 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Dig them up and burn them?

On Fri, 10 Sep 2010 01:51:25 +0100, Janet Tweedy
wrote:

In article , Jake
writes
It may not be "green" but may be better to bag it up and put it into
the "non-recyclable" skip along with general rubbish.



Try telling that to at least two people I've seen recently at the tip
putting blighted stuff on he green waste! Too late to recall it as both
times the stuff had already been dumped into the containers.


In this group, we're talking to the already converted Every visit to
my local tip leaves me in despair. Not just garden stuff but idiots
who can't tell the difference between an old vacuum cleaner and a
cardboard box!

At my local tip, idiots occasionally dump Knotweed but the chaps there
are pretty alert. We always know when we see the plume of smoke as
they thoroughly burn the contents of the skip.

I now work on the basis that any compost which has in any minor part
been sourced from amenity sites is to be avoided.

This year I grew all my bedding plants in coir - those blocks you put
in a wheelbarrow and then chuck a couple of buckets of water on. I had
to feed/water them more but I got better plants at the end of the day.


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