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Old 30-07-2019, 12:31 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Can these wonky Boston Ivy plants be trimmed?

I bought two Boston Ivy plants online. Unfortunately, the ones which
arrived are 'wonky' in that a few inches above the soil their main stems
set off at right angles, although there is limited other growth.

For where they are intended they really need to set off going up the
wall rather than along it. A bit of deviation would be OK but 90 degrees
is too much.

So do you folks know whether it would be safe to cut off the
sideways-pointing limbs?

I've put pictures of them both at

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1nJ...DcZqRiQa4Eir2U
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Bl...9afZyfoXjYbuns

It's those woody leftward-growing shoots that I want to cut off but I am
concerned that doing so might kill the plants.

What do you think? Opinions welcome.


--
James Harris


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Old 30-07-2019, 04:46 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Can these wonky Boston Ivy plants be trimmed?

On 30/07/2019 12:31, James Harris wrote:
I bought two Boston Ivy plants online. Unfortunately, the ones which
arrived are 'wonky' in that a few inches above the soil their main stems
set off at right angles, although there is limited other growth.

For where they are intended they really need to set off going up the
wall rather than along it. A bit of deviation would be OK but 90 degrees
is too much.

So do you folks know whether it would be safe to cut off the
sideways-pointing limbs?

I've put pictures of them both at

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1nJ...DcZqRiQa4Eir2U
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Bl...9afZyfoXjYbuns

It's those woody leftward-growing shoots that I want to cut off but I am
concerned that doing so might kill the plants.

What do you think? Opinions welcome.


I wouldn't wory, pinch off the growing tip and let the sideshoots take
over, they will grow up and give you a wider spread, I opten plant
climbers with the main shoot along the ground so that you get more
shoots developing to grow up.
Alternativly, why not put the plant in on it's side so the shoot is
pointing up?
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Old 31-07-2019, 06:43 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Can these wonky Boston Ivy plants be trimmed?

On 30/07/2019 16:46, David Hill wrote:
On 30/07/2019 12:31, James Harris wrote:
I bought two Boston Ivy plants online. Unfortunately, the ones which
arrived are 'wonky' in that a few inches above the soil their main stems
set off at right angles, although there is limited other growth.

For where they are intended they really need to set off going up the
wall rather than along it. A bit of deviation would be OK but 90 degrees
is too much.

So do you folks know whether it would be safe to cut off the
sideways-pointing limbs?

I've put pictures of them both at

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1nJ...DcZqRiQa4Eir2U
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Bl...9afZyfoXjYbuns

It's those woody leftward-growing shoots that I want to cut off but I am
concerned that doing so might kill the plants.

What do you think? Opinions welcome.


I wouldn't wory, pinch off the growing tip and let the sideshoots take
over, they will grow up and give you a wider spread, I opten plant
climbers with the main shoot along the ground so that you get more
shoots developing to grow up.


I'll give it some thought. The problem is that the two plants are
intended to be in a position of prime visibility either side of the
front door. And because of the layout there they really need to grow
upwards - at least at first; they can branch plenty later.

Alternativly, why not put the plant in on it's side so the shoot is
pointing up?


Interesting idea. I could do that with the second one of them (as long
as the rest of it didn't mind being buried). But the first arrived with
the woody shoot cut off and all the new growth in the bit which would
have to be buried.

What do you think would actually happen if I did cut off the woody
sideways-limbs? Do you think a plant such as these would be likely to
die or to keep growing? I'm at the point where I feel I might need to
take the risk!


--
James Harris

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Old 04-08-2019, 10:05 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Can these wonky Boston Ivy plants be trimmed?

James Harris wrote:

What do you think would actually happen if I did cut off the woody
sideways-limbs? Do you think a plant such as these would be likely to
die or to keep growing? I'm at the point where I feel I might need to
take the risk!


You're worrying too much. Climbers like this are very robust. If you
bury it, it will root nearer the surface and keep growing. If you cut
off anything, it will sprout from where you cut and keep growing. If
you plant it as is, it will work out which way is up and reach for the
sky (and to a lesser extent, all other directons too) and keep growing.

If you're concerned, first pot them on into much larger pots and cosset
them for a few weeks and I think you'll see lots of strong growth which
will reassure you.

The only thing you need to worry about if you plant it now is to keep it
well watered until the autumn rains.

Peter
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Old 11-08-2019, 01:58 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Can these wonky Boston Ivy plants be trimmed?

On 04/08/2019 10:05, Peter Robinson wrote:
James Harris wrote:

What do you think would actually happen if I did cut off the woody
sideways-limbs? Do you think a plant such as these would be likely to
die or to keep growing? I'm at the point where I feel I might need to
take the risk!


You're worrying too much.


Quite possibly. Beginner's uncertainty. :-)

Climbers like this are very robust. If you
bury it, it will root nearer the surface and keep growing. If you cut
off anything, it will sprout from where you cut and keep growing. If
you plant it as is, it will work out which way is up and reach for the
sky (and to a lesser extent, all other directons too) and keep growing.


Well, I took the plunge and before planing them cut the sideshoots off
where they left the main stems. And I followed Chris's advice to pot up
various cuttings in gritty soil so we'll see how they go.


--
James Harris


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Old 23-08-2019, 02:01 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Can these wonky Boston Ivy plants be trimmed?

On 31/07/2019 08:35, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Tue, 30 Jul 2019 12:31:37 +0100, James Harris
wrote:

I bought two Boston Ivy plants online. Unfortunately, the ones which
arrived are 'wonky' in that a few inches above the soil their main stems
set off at right angles, although there is limited other growth.

For where they are intended they really need to set off going up the
wall rather than along it. A bit of deviation would be OK but 90 degrees
is too much.

So do you folks know whether it would be safe to cut off the
sideways-pointing limbs?

I've put pictures of them both at

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1nJ...DcZqRiQa4Eir2U
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Bl...9afZyfoXjYbuns

It's those woody leftward-growing shoots that I want to cut off but I am
concerned that doing so might kill the plants.

What do you think? Opinions welcome.


If they were mine, I'd trim back those left-growing shoots by about
two-thirds. There are young shoots and nodes around the top of the two
main stems and probably along those side shoots, which will continue
to grow. When you put the plants in the soil, you could arrange for
those trimmed stems to be angled upwards at 45 degrees, much as David
suggested. Just go for it. (You could even try potting up the
trimmings into some gritty compost and putting them a well lit place
but out of direct sunshine. Who knows, they might root, and hey
presto! two more plants for free).


Remember this query about the ivies? I put various cuttings - some
green, some woody - in gritty compost for a couple of weeks or so and
then, since something - probably squirrels - knocked them over I checked
for roots. Unfortunately, none have formed.

I've now repotted some of the cuttings and tried putting others so that
the bases of their stems are touching wet paper towelling in hope that
that may encourage them to begin rooting to get into the moisture. But I
am not too hopeful.

But that's an aside. This post is really an update on what I planted.
You may remember I wanted to grow two Boston ivies, one either side of
the front door.

Well, one has got the hang of this growing lark and is doing exactly
what I wanted it to do. :-)

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Z-...6_TIwII55CAZ4S

That's absolutely perfect and is proceeding at a rate of knots!

The other one, however, is not doing much so far.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1EU...9zyuP_B40wagF7

I am not sure whether anything there will turn into the kind of growing
tendril that the other has put out.

If anyone has a view as to whether the second one is viable or not I'd
be pleased to hear what you think. If the second one is not going to
grow like the first and I'm not going to get any cuttings to grow then
I'll need to buy another plant asap. They are now in a race!


--
James Harris

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Old 23-08-2019, 04:10 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Can these wonky Boston Ivy plants be trimmed?

On 23/08/2019 14:01, James Harris wrote:
On 31/07/2019 08:35, Chris Hogg wrote:
On Tue, 30 Jul 2019 12:31:37 +0100, James Harris
wrote:

I bought two Boston Ivy plants online. Unfortunately, the ones which
arrived are 'wonky' in that a few inches above the soil their main stems
set off at right angles, although there is limited other growth.

For where they are intended they really need to set off going up the
wall rather than along it. A bit of deviation would be OK but 90 degrees
is too much.

So do you folks know whether it would be safe to cut off the
sideways-pointing limbs?

I've put pictures of them both at

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1nJ...DcZqRiQa4Eir2U
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Bl...9afZyfoXjYbuns

It's those woody leftward-growing shoots that I want to cut off but I am
concerned that doing so might kill the plants.

What do you think? Opinions welcome.


If they were mine, I'd trim back those left-growing shoots by about
two-thirds. There are young shoots and nodes around the top of the two
main stems and probably along those side shoots, which will continue
to grow. When you put the plants in the soil, you could arrange for
those trimmed stems to be angled upwards at 45 degrees, much as David
suggested. Just go for it. (You could even try potting up the
trimmings into some gritty compost and putting them a well lit place
but out of direct sunshine. Who knows, they might root, and hey
presto! two more plants for free).


Remember this query about the ivies? I put various cuttings - some
green, some woody - in gritty compost for a couple of weeks or so and
then, since something - probably squirrels - knocked them over I checked
for roots. Unfortunately, none have formed.

I've now repotted some of the cuttings and tried putting others so that
the bases of their stems are touching wet paper towelling in hope that
that may encourage them to begin rooting to get into the moisture. But I
am not too hopeful.

But that's an aside. This post is really an update on what I planted.
You may remember I wanted to grow two Boston ivies, one either side of
the front door.

Well, one has got the hang of this growing lark and is doing exactly
what I wanted it to do. :-)

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Z-...6_TIwII55CAZ4S

That's absolutely perfect and is proceeding at a rate of knots!

The other one, however, is not doing much so far.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1EU...9zyuP_B40wagF7

I am not sure whether anything there will turn into the kind of growing
tendril that the other has put out.

If anyone has a view as to whether the second one is viable or not I'd
be pleased to hear what you think. If the second one is not going to
grow like the first and I'm not going to get any cuttings to grow then
I'll need to buy another plant asap. They are now in a race!


Cuttings can be surprisingly slow for something that is borderline
rampant, you may not see roots until the spring. I would normally try
and do cuttings April so you were quite late starting.

Both plants look to be very small for planting direct out but the one
seems to have gone away so should be fine the second is in the fingers
crossed camp!

--
Charlie Pridham
Gardening in Cornwall
www.roselandhouse.co.uk


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