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Old 27-06-2011, 04:20 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Identify small tree

Anyone have any idea what it is?

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u...k/Capture1.jpg
--
Paul O.

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Old 27-06-2011, 04:48 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Identify small tree

On 6/27/11 8:20 AM, Paul wrote:
Anyone have any idea what it is?

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u...k/Capture1.jpg


Silk tree (Albizia julibrissin): This can eventually be a tree 40 feet
high with a branch spread of 80 feet. This is a tropical or (at best) a
subtropical, damaged by frosts.

It might instead be a plume albizia (A. distachya), which is even more
tropical. This one grows to about 20 feet.

--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html
Gardening diary at http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary
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Old 27-06-2011, 05:30 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Identify small tree

In article ,
"David E. Ross" wrote:

On 6/27/11 8:20 AM, Paul wrote:
Anyone have any idea what it is?

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u...k/Capture1.jpg


Silk tree (Albizia julibrissin): This can eventually be a tree 40 feet
high with a branch spread of 80 feet. This is a tropical or (at best) a
subtropical, damaged by frosts.

There is a variety of Albizia julibrissin which is quite cold hardy. I
live in zone 7 and they grow all over town.

It might instead be a plume albizia (A. distachya), which is even more
tropical. This one grows to about 20 feet.

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Old 27-06-2011, 09:48 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Identify small tree

On Mon, 27 Jun 2011 08:20:56 -0700, "Paul" wrote:

Anyone have any idea what it is?

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u...k/Capture1.jpg


Everything about it, it's fern-like leaves (the leaves close/contract
when touched), and especially those pink fluffy flowers prove it's a
mimosa tree... attractive but can be messy/invasive. Many years ago I
had a mature one growing in my front yard... I do not recommend this
tree... I were you I'd immediately pluck it.

http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/29
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Old 27-06-2011, 09:57 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Identify small tree

On Mon, 27 Jun 2011 10:30:42 -0600, Amos Nomore
wrote:

In article ,
"David E. Ross" wrote:

On 6/27/11 8:20 AM, Paul wrote:
Anyone have any idea what it is?

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u...k/Capture1.jpg


Silk tree (Albizia julibrissin): This can eventually be a tree 40 feet
high with a branch spread of 80 feet. This is a tropical or (at best) a
subtropical, damaged by frosts.

There is a variety of Albizia julibrissin which is quite cold hardy. I
live in zone 7 and they grow all over town.


The one I had survived Long Island, NY winters quite well. They don't
make good shade trees, at least not to sit under, the aroma from those
pom pom like flowers are excellent stinging insect bait. Some folks
like mimosa trees but I consider it a noxious weed.


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Old 28-06-2011, 12:20 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Identify small tree

On 6/27/2011 4:57 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
On Mon, 27 Jun 2011 10:30:42 -0600, Amos Nomore
wrote:

In t,
"David E. wrote:

Some folks
like mimosa trees but I consider it a noxious weed.


I second that. They can grow, and spread, crazy fast. Something he
http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/29

They may grow a lot slower up north.

Jeff
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Old 28-06-2011, 03:13 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Identify small tree



--
Paul O.
"Brooklyn1" Gravesend1 wrote in message
...
On Mon, 27 Jun 2011 08:20:56 -0700, "Paul" wrote:

Anyone have any idea what it is?

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u...k/Capture1.jpg


Everything about it, it's fern-like leaves (the leaves close/contract
when touched), and especially those pink fluffy flowers prove it's a
mimosa tree... attractive but can be messy/invasive. Many years ago I
had a mature one growing in my front yard... I do not recommend this
tree... I were you I'd immediately pluck it.

http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/29


Thanks. It's currently in a large pot where a bird must have dropped a seed.
When it outgrows the pot, I'll get rid of it, don't want it spreading. Maybe
I should get it out of here anyway, before it spreads it's seeds.

Paul O.

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Old 28-06-2011, 06:31 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Identify small tree

"Paul" wrote in message
...
Paul O.
"Brooklyn1" Gravesend1 wrote in message
...
On Mon, 27 Jun 2011 08:20:56 -0700, "Paul" wrote:

Anyone have any idea what it is?

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u...k/Capture1.jpg


Everything about it, it's fern-like leaves (the leaves close/contract
when touched), and especially those pink fluffy flowers prove it's a
mimosa tree... attractive but can be messy/invasive. Many years ago I
had a mature one growing in my front yard... I do not recommend this
tree... I were you I'd immediately pluck it.

http://plants.ifas.ufl.edu/node/29


Thanks. It's currently in a large pot where a bird must have dropped a
seed. When it outgrows the pot, I'll get rid of it, don't want it
spreading. Maybe I should get it out of here anyway, before it spreads
it's seeds.


I'd keep it.


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Old 28-06-2011, 08:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul View Post
Anyone have any idea what it is?

http://i170.photobucket.com/albums/u...k/Capture1.jpg
--
Paul O.
hi paul i think its either an Acacia 'Dealbata', or possibly a Mimosa 'Tenuiflora'..
could be wrong but its more than likely a young Acacia tree
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Old 28-06-2011, 10:23 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default honda mower, stripe strip

The Greenman writes:

message to all who may know the secrets held in this tiny peice of my
mower. but will it yeild its secrets. will it f**k...i need to remove
the original rubber, and replace with new one..now the old one is about
an inch long/wide...i hope somoeone knows what im talking about...going
to smash my mower up and get a job in an office....if i cant solve this
one...so just to recap i, trying to remove to rubber blade on the back
of my honda mower , this blade puts more pressure on the grass, after
its been cut, thus giving the stripe effect...anyine help/// please,


Most likely riveted on.

If so, drill them out.
Visit hardware store and buy yourself rivet gun (more like a pair
of pliers) and some rivets. Pay attention to the size,

Seems to me replacement rubber would have come with some attachment
mechanism?


--
Dan Espen


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Old 28-06-2011, 11:14 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default honda mower, stripe strip

The Greenman wrote:

message to all who may know the secrets held in this tiny peice of my
mower. but will it yeild its secrets. will it f**k...i need to remove
the original rubber, and replace with new one..now the old one is about
an inch long/wide...i hope somoeone knows what im talking about...going
to smash my mower up and get a job in an office....if i cant solve this
one...so just to recap i, trying to remove to rubber blade on the back
of my honda mower , this blade puts more pressure on the grass, after
its been cut, thus giving the stripe effect...anyine help/// please,


if it is the little metal caps on the
end of the rod then you can take them
off with pliers (bend them) or with a
screwdriver and hammer.

i'm sure they have some special tool
someplace to deal with these kind of
pressure connectors, but they have always
given us new ones with the flap and those
just go on by tapping them lightly with
a small hammer.

if they are some other kind of connector
then good luck, perhaps someone else will
know...


songbird


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