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Old 29-01-2012, 12:02 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the water-
immersed egg shells.

Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.

TIA

HB

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Old 29-01-2012, 12:47 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

On Sat, 28 Jan 2012 16:02:41 -0800 (PST), Higgs Boson
wrote:

Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the water-
immersed egg shells.


Eggshells are chiefly calcium. Dry 'em (poss toss them into the
ovenafter you've pulled out supper and let them coast on the residual
heat), crumble them up, then sprinkle around the base of plants which
have higher calcium demands (tomatoes and cucumbers for instance).

I honestly don't go through the hassle myself - I just add them to the
composter with green matter from the ktichen (but never meat/dairy),
or feed them back to my chickens (who take up the calcium for
producing eggshells - though their lay mix has oyster shell in it for
the same purpose).

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Old 29-01-2012, 03:28 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

On 1/28/12 4:02 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:
Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the water-
immersed egg shells.

Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.

TIA

HB


Egg shells tend to make soil more alkaline. Where I live, this is
definitely not a good thing since both our soils and our water already
are quite alkaline.

For calcium, I use gypsum (calcium sulfate), which tends to be neutral.

--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html
Gardening diary at http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary
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Old 29-01-2012, 05:40 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

In article ,
"David E. Ross" wrote:

On 1/28/12 4:02 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:
Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the water-
immersed egg shells.

Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.

TIA

HB


Egg shells tend to make soil more alkaline. Where I live, this is
definitely not a good thing since both our soils and our water already
are quite alkaline.

For calcium, I use gypsum (calcium sulfate), which tends to be neutral.


Alkaline (high pH = bacterial), with in limits, is good for a vegetable
garden, and acidity (low pH = fungi) is good for perennial plants. We
are basically talking about a pH of 5 to a pH of 8 for all types of
gardens from perennial to annual.

As far as egg shells go, they are a real slow release. So the question
is how long will you be cultivating this earth? If a long time, add
eggshells. If you are leaving this residence soon, you'd probably get
more bang for your buck from the gypsum.
--

Billy

E Pluribus Unum

Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone. It is spending the sweat of its laborers, the genius of its scientists, the hopes of its children. This is not a way of life at all in any true sense. Under the clouds of war, it is humanity hanging on a cross of iron.
- Dwight D. Eisenhower, 16 April 1953

"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
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Old 29-01-2012, 10:42 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

Toss 'em in the compost and be done with it. Chief value is for calcium, which is something all plants need in moderation.


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Old 29-01-2012, 05:28 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

On Sat, 28 Jan 2012 19:28:22 -0800, "David E. Ross"
wrote:

On 1/28/12 4:02 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:
Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the water-
immersed egg shells.

Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.

TIA

HB


Egg shells tend to make soil more alkaline. Where I live, this is
definitely not a good thing since both our soils and our water already
are quite alkaline.

For calcium, I use gypsum (calcium sulfate), which tends to be neutral.


Gypsum and calcium don't "tend" to be neutral, they *are* neutral.
Egg shells are neutral too. Eggshells are NOT alkaline nor do they
make soil alkaline. However one would need to add an awful lot of
eggshells to derive a benefit. It's far better to apply gardening
lime, granular lime works best and is much easier to apply evenly. If
one desires add your eggshells to your composter, but be aware that
eggshells take a very long time to break down. And unless eggshells
are scrupulously cleaned the proteins clinging to the interior will
attract vermin. Putting eggshells in the garden does more harm than
good.
http://www.struykturf.com/Soil.html

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Old 29-01-2012, 10:41 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

Brooklyn1 wrote:
On Sat, 28 Jan 2012 19:28:22 -0800, "David E. Ross"
wrote:

On 1/28/12 4:02 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:
Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the
water- immersed egg shells.

Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.

TIA

HB


Egg shells tend to make soil more alkaline. Where I live, this is
definitely not a good thing since both our soils and our water
already are quite alkaline.

For calcium, I use gypsum (calcium sulfate), which tends to be
neutral.


Gypsum and calcium don't "tend" to be neutral, they *are* neutral.


Gypsum is roughly neutral yes. I don't know what you mean by 'calcium' in
this case as you surely would not have metallic calcium and the degree of
alkalinity would depend on the salt of calcium. For example calcium
hydroxide (builder's lime) is more alkaline that calcium carbonate (garden
lime).

Egg shells are neutral too. Eggshells are NOT alkaline nor do they
make soil alkaline.


No. Once the adhering protein is gone egg shells are mainly calcium
carbonate the same as garden lime, they have some protein bound into the
structure of the shell but not much. The difference is the speed that they
dissolve. Lime is usually ground quite finely and it will dissolve much
quicker (and therefore raise the pH quicker ) than eggshells which are in
big chunks.

However one would need to add an awful lot of
eggshells to derive a benefit. It's far better to apply gardening
lime, granular lime works best and is much easier to apply evenly.


True, this is the key point. Unless you have a lot of chooks and grind up
the shells finely it will take an eon to do very much if anything at all.

If
one desires add your eggshells to your composter, but be aware that
eggshells take a very long time to break down. And unless eggshells
are scrupulously cleaned the proteins clinging to the interior will
attract vermin. Putting eggshells in the garden does more harm than
good.


I doubt it. A few ants in the compost don't matter. I put eggshells in the
compost not because I want to lime my garden but to get rid of them
conveniently and because they do no harm.

D


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Old 30-01-2012, 02:34 AM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

On Jan 29, 2:41*pm, "David Hare-Scott" wrote:
Brooklyn1 wrote:
On Sat, 28 Jan 2012 19:28:22 -0800, "David E. Ross"
wrote:


On 1/28/12 4:02 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:
Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. *I don't remember more. *I kept the container on the side
steps. *NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the
water- immersed egg shells.


Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? *If yes, *then on which plants and how often.


TIA


HB


Egg shells tend to make soil more alkaline. *Where I live, this is
definitely not a good thing since both our soils and our water
already are quite alkaline.


For calcium, I use gypsum (calcium sulfate), which tends to be
neutral.


Gypsum and calcium don't "tend" to be neutral, they *are* neutral.


Gypsum is roughly neutral yes. *I don't know what you mean by 'calcium' in
this case as you surely would not have metallic calcium and the degree of
alkalinity would depend on the salt of calcium. *For example calcium
hydroxide (builder's lime) is more alkaline that calcium carbonate (garden
lime).

Egg shells are neutral too. *Eggshells are NOT alkaline nor do they
make soil alkaline.


No. *Once the adhering protein is gone egg shells are mainly calcium
carbonate the same as garden lime, they have some protein bound into the
structure of the shell but not much. *The difference is the speed that they
dissolve. *Lime is usually ground quite finely and it will dissolve much
quicker (and therefore raise the pH quicker ) than eggshells which are in
big chunks.

However one would need to add an awful lot of

eggshells to derive a benefit. *It's far better to apply gardening
lime, granular lime works best and is much easier to apply evenly.


True, this is the key point. *Unless you have a lot of chooks and grind up
the shells finely it will take an eon to do very much if anything at all.

If

one desires add your eggshells to your composter, but be aware that
eggshells take a very long time to break down. *And unless eggshells
are scrupulously cleaned the proteins clinging to the interior will
attract vermin. *Putting eggshells in the garden does more harm than
good.


I doubt it. *A few ants in the compost don't matter. *I put eggshells in the
compost not because I want to lime my garden but to get rid of them
conveniently and because they do no harm.

D


Thanks, everybody. Project hereby abandoned. Appreciate the wisdom.

HB
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Old 30-01-2012, 12:13 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

Higgs Boson wrote:

Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the water-
immersed egg shells.

Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.


for me recycling eggshells wasn't worth
the added expense. a bag of agricultural
lime ran about $6.50 for 50lbs. at the
rate i use it that should keep me a good
20 years or so.


songbird
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Old 30-01-2012, 06:11 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

On 1/30/12 4:13 AM, songbird wrote:
Higgs Boson wrote:

Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the water-
immersed egg shells.

Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.


for me recycling eggshells wasn't worth
the added expense. a bag of agricultural
lime ran about $6.50 for 50lbs. at the
rate i use it that should keep me a good
20 years or so.

songbird


You live where the soil is acidic. I live where both the soil and water
are alkaline.

At least once each year, I broadcast soil sulfur around certain plants
such as camellias, roses, a liquidambar tree, an Australian tea tree,
and a gardenia. On the other hand, my bearded iris, primroses, and
cheddar pinks (dianthus) thrive with the alkalinity. Agricultural lime
is hard to find in my area.

--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html
Gardening diary at http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary


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Old 30-01-2012, 07:40 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

"David E. Ross" wrote:
songbird wrote:
Higgs Boson wrote:

Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the water-
immersed egg shells.

Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.


for me recycling eggshells wasn't worth
the added expense. a bag of agricultural
lime ran about $6.50 for 50lbs. at the
rate i use it that should keep me a good
20 years or so.

songbird


Agricultural lime is hard to find in my area.


That's utter nonsense... agri lime is sold at every plant nursery in
the US, everywhere that sells lawn maintence and farming products
sells agri lime... not to mention all over the internet. Where's this
secretive area you live... in your lonely drug crazed fantasy world...
you're being ridiculous and dishonest.
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Old 30-01-2012, 08:00 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

On Jan 30, 7:13*am, songbird wrote:
Higgs Boson wrote:
Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. *I don't remember more. *I kept the container on the side
steps. *NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the water-
immersed egg shells.


Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? *If yes, *then on which plants and how often.


* for me recycling eggshells wasn't worth
the added expense. *a bag of agricultural
lime ran about $6.50 for 50lbs. *at the
rate i use it that should keep me a good
20 years or so.

* songbird


Dolomitic lime adds calcium and magnesium, plus helps
to keep pH levels stable. Eggshells have the most benefit
with vermicomposting, keeps the crew healthy.
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Old 30-01-2012, 08:01 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

On Jan 28, 10:28*pm, "David E. Ross" wrote:
On 1/28/12 4:02 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. *I don't remember more. *I kept the container on the side
steps. *NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the water-
immersed egg shells.


Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? *If yes, *then on which plants and how often.


TIA


HB


Egg shells tend to make soil more alkaline. *Where I live, this is
definitely not a good thing since both our soils and our water already
are quite alkaline.

For calcium, I use gypsum (calcium sulfate), which tends to be neutral.


Drywall scraps are a cheap, if not free, source.
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Old 30-01-2012, 08:44 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

On Jan 30, 10:11*am, "David E. Ross" wrote:
On 1/30/12 4:13 AM, songbird wrote:









Higgs Boson wrote:


Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. *I don't remember more. *I kept the container on the side
steps. *NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the water-
immersed egg shells.


Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? *If yes, *then on which plants and how often.


* for me recycling eggshells wasn't worth
the added expense. *a bag of agricultural
lime ran about $6.50 for 50lbs. *at the
rate i use it that should keep me a good
20 years or so.


* songbird


You live where the soil is acidic. *I live where both the soil and water
are alkaline.

No, it was originally alkaline; good old California adobe. However,
it has been modified over many decades by the previous owner and
myself, so it's pretty well balanced by now.

HB

At least once each year, I broadcast soil sulfur around certain plants
such as camellias, roses, a liquidambar tree, an Australian tea tree,
and a gardenia. *On the other hand, my bearded iris, primroses, and
cheddar pinks (dianthus) thrive with the alkalinity. *Agricultural lime
is hard to find in my area.

--
David E. Ross
Climate: *California Mediterranean, see
http://www.rossde.com/garden/climate.html
Gardening diary at http://www.rossde.com/garden/diary


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Old 30-01-2012, 11:45 PM posted to rec.gardens
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Default Egg shells as plant food

Father Haskell wrote:
On Jan 28, 10:28 pm, "David E. Ross" wrote:
On 1/28/12 4:02 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

Amigas & amigos, years ago I read that eggshell water is good for
plants. I don't remember more. I kept the container on the side
steps. NEVER smelled anything like the odor emanating from the
water- immersed egg shells.


Now I started saving them again, but before I concoct yet another
witches brew, could I sample the NG as to the usefulness/efficacy of
this project? If yes, then on which plants and how often.


TIA


HB


Egg shells tend to make soil more alkaline. Where I live, this is
definitely not a good thing since both our soils and our water
already are quite alkaline.

For calcium, I use gypsum (calcium sulfate), which tends to be
neutral.


Drywall scraps are a cheap, if not free, source.


Which you then have to grind up somehow or wait for ages. Gypsum isn't
expensive.

D



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