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Old 01-04-2003, 06:20 PM
Lance R.
 
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Default natural area

Is there any problem with using grass clippings as a bedding in my natural
area? Or should I always mulch the grass and buy some pine straw or bark?

--
Lance




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Old 01-04-2003, 09:32 PM
Penny Morgan
 
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You can use the grass clippings as mulch if you want to, but the drawback is
that it won't look very fresh like mulch or pinestraw. Grass is actually a
very healthy mulch for plants because it breaks down and provides nitrogen,
provides protection from weeds and retains moisture. It really acts the
same as other mulches except that it provides more nutrients. You could add
a thick layer of grass clippings in the natural area and then top with a
thin layer of hardwood mulch or pinestraw to ensure that it looks fresh. I
use grass clippings as a mulch on my vegetable gardens. I first layer the
beds with sections of newspaper and then put the grass on top. If it's
fresh, be careful not to let it touch the plants because it will become very
hot and burn the plants while decomposing. You can spread the clippings out
on a tarp for a few days and let it brown up first. If your question was
about mowing and mulching the clippings to leave on your lawn, that is also
a very good way to continuously feed your lawn. After I finish mulching my
gardens, I usually mow and let the mulched clippings stay in the grass. You
don't see the grass unless you wait too long between mowings and the blades
of grass are really tall. Hope this answers your questions.

Penny
"Lance R." wrote in message
...
Is there any problem with using grass clippings as a bedding in my natural
area? Or should I always mulch the grass and buy some pine straw or bark?

--
Lance





  #3   Report Post  
Old 01-04-2003, 09:44 PM
Tom Gauldin
 
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Default natural area

Penny, I'm hoping that others might also chip in on this, but my experience
was the opposite of yours. In Indiana, I collected my clippings and used
them for mulch as well. However, as the grass composted beneath the 'crust'
formed by the dry grass on top,, I found that it cut back on plant growth.
I was told that the composting grass clippings robbed the area of nitrogen
and that I should first compost the grass clippings separately, turning them
frequently, and adding urea before spreading them out in the garden.

I constructed a pen where I'd dump my clippings and would toss in a cup of
urea pellets each time. I kept a pitch fork handy and would "turn" the new
grass into the old. It composted fairly rapidly and made a good topping for
the garden. In the fall, I'd empty my pen of the balance of the composted
grass and spread it on the garden before tilling.

--

Tom Gauldin, Las Vegas NV
NEW EMAIL
NEW PHONE (702) 263-8804 voice/fax

"Penny Morgan" wrote in message
. ..
You can use the grass clippings as mulch if you want to, but the drawback

is
that it won't look very fresh like mulch or pinestraw. Grass is actually

a



  #4   Report Post  
Old 02-04-2003, 06:20 PM
Brad Heidinger
 
Posts: n/a
Default natural area

Hi Tom,

What is the purpose of the Urea? Is it a catalyst to activate the compost. I
have heard of adding a handful of 10:10:10 fertilizer or other compost activator
but never straight urea pellets. I guess it worked well for you or you wouldn't
have done it, eh? I think I will give it a try. My compost is always on the cold
side. (Partly due to less than adequate sun) Granted, it will heat up but never
to the degree that I desire. I want to kill all those weed seeds.

Regards,
Brad

Tom Gauldin wrote:

Penny, I'm hoping that others might also chip in on this, but my experience
was the opposite of yours. In Indiana, I collected my clippings and used
them for mulch as well. However, as the grass composted beneath the 'crust'
formed by the dry grass on top,, I found that it cut back on plant growth.
I was told that the composting grass clippings robbed the area of nitrogen
and that I should first compost the grass clippings separately, turning them
frequently, and adding urea before spreading them out in the garden.

I constructed a pen where I'd dump my clippings and would toss in a cup of
urea pellets each time. I kept a pitch fork handy and would "turn" the new
grass into the old. It composted fairly rapidly and made a good topping for
the garden. In the fall, I'd empty my pen of the balance of the composted
grass and spread it on the garden before tilling.

--

Tom Gauldin, Las Vegas NV
NEW EMAIL
NEW PHONE (702) 263-8804 voice/fax

"Penny Morgan" wrote in message
. ..
You can use the grass clippings as mulch if you want to, but the drawback

is
that it won't look very fresh like mulch or pinestraw. Grass is actually

a


  #5   Report Post  
Old 03-04-2003, 10:45 PM
Tom Gauldin
 
Posts: n/a
Default natural area

I tossed in the urea on the assumption that the decomposition used up the
nitrogen in the material and that replacing it with urea would help to
balance the process. Yes, I also think that it speeded up the process by
adding some heat as well. It worked for me, but you might want to
experiment some. BTW- the stuff would get hot enough to be uncomfortable
when churning, so be cautious.

--

Tom Gauldin, Las Vegas NV
NEW EMAIL
NEW PHONE (702) 263-8804 voice/fax

"Brad Heidinger" wrote in message
...
Hi Tom,

What is the purpose of the Urea? Is it a catalyst to activate the compost.

I
have heard of adding a handful of 10:10:10 fertilizer or other compost

activator
but never straight urea pellets. I guess it worked well for you or you

wouldn't
have done it, eh? I think I will give it a try. My compost is always on

the cold
side. (Partly due to less than adequate sun) Granted, it will heat up but

never
to the degree that I desire. I want to kill all those weed seeds.

Regards,
Brad

Tom Gauldin wrote:

Penny, I'm hoping that others might also chip in on this, but my

experience
was the opposite of yours. In Indiana, I collected my clippings and

used
them for mulch as well. However, as the grass composted beneath the

'crust'
formed by the dry grass on top,, I found that it cut back on plant

growth.
I was told that the composting grass clippings robbed the area of

nitrogen
and that I should first compost the grass clippings separately, turning

them
frequently, and adding urea before spreading them out in the garden.

I constructed a pen where I'd dump my clippings and would toss in a cup

of
urea pellets each time. I kept a pitch fork handy and would "turn" the

new
grass into the old. It composted fairly rapidly and made a good topping

for
the garden. In the fall, I'd empty my pen of the balance of the

composted
grass and spread it on the garden before tilling.

--

Tom Gauldin, Las Vegas NV
NEW EMAIL

NEW PHONE (702) 263-8804 voice/fax

"Penny Morgan" wrote in message
. ..
You can use the grass clippings as mulch if you want to, but the

drawback
is
that it won't look very fresh like mulch or pinestraw. Grass is

actually
a






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