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  #16   Report Post  
Old 09-06-2005, 12:47 AM
danny
 
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I've had to take judging photos of Ervin Granier's plants and I still
haven't become a Cattleya nut. Of course part of the reason is I can't grow
many of them under lights. Maybe someday when I have a greenhouse...
-danny

"Mick Fournier" wrote in message
. ..
Rob,

Yes, there is always one poucher in the group at the least. Ah well... in
due time you too shall come back into the fold where you belong. Some day
I
will be posting blooming pictures of the Cattleya percivaliana coeruleas I
have in flask now and you too will succumb to the Cattleya siren.

Mick





  #17   Report Post  
Old 09-06-2005, 04:38 AM
Mick Fournier
 
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Danny,

Neofinetia falcata don't grow in semi hydro or sphagnum moss east of the
Mississippi and south of the Mason-Dixon. I have seen only a couple of
California growers able to start and maintain some juveniles in sphagnum
moss and then only if the plastic pot is an airy web pot. You need a teak
or cedar basket instead. Tie the plant firmly to the inside of the wood
basket and pop some chopped cubes of coarse coconut husk into the basket.

Mick

=========================

"danny" wrote in message
. ..
For some reason the Neofinetias are a bit touchy for me (and many other
people in Atlanta). I haven't gotten them to keep their roots in my CHC

mix
or in semi-hydro, I just repotted them into sphagnum to see if that works.

The Sedirea is nice for growing under lights. Some of the Aerides plants
I've seen are kinda big and viny for my conditions.

-danny

"Mick Fournier" wrote in message
...
Danny,

Sedirea spelled backwards is Aerides. I bloomed an Aerides
quinquevulnerum
var purpurea two weeks ago.

Click on:
http://personalpages.bellsouth.net/f...ridesquin1.jpg

I sell these in flask on my website.

If you can bloom Sedirea... then what's the big deal over blooming out
Neofinetia falcata?

Mick





  #18   Report Post  
Old 09-06-2005, 05:43 AM
Dave S
 
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Mick,

I'm not fully versed on Cattleya genetics. What color form(s) would you
expect from a cross of a coerulea on the semi-alba?

My Cattleya mossiae semi-alba didn't spike this year...probably upset
by our move last fall. It is absolutely stunning when it does...as is
the one in the photo you posted. Hard to beat those big, showy Cattleya
species.

Dave

Mick Fournier wrote:
Ray,

Ooooo Ray, that hurt. I am no longer a hybridizer. I put some pollen from
a blue ribbon (2003 Redlands show) Cattleya mossiae var coerulea on this
plant and the pod has already started. I think that is going to be my cross
of choice on this stud plant.

Mick


  #19   Report Post  
Old 09-06-2005, 06:02 AM
Susan Erickson
 
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On Wed, 8 Jun 2005 23:38:59 -0400, "Mick Fournier"
wrote:

Danny,

Neofinetia falcata don't grow in semi hydro or sphagnum moss east of the
Mississippi and south of the Mason-Dixon. I have seen only a couple of
California growers able to start and maintain some juveniles in sphagnum
moss and then only if the plastic pot is an airy web pot. You need a teak
or cedar basket instead. Tie the plant firmly to the inside of the wood
basket and pop some chopped cubes of coarse coconut husk into the basket.

Mick


The basket I agree on - but I like to make it very small and prop
them high in the basket with moss under them - sort of the
traditional mound. When I had coarse husk in the basket they had
a tendency to settle down in below the top edge. Then they
pouted.
They are worth all the fuss Danny.
SuE
http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/albums.php
  #20   Report Post  
Old 09-06-2005, 06:03 AM
Susan Erickson
 
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On Wed, 8 Jun 2005 19:15:50 -0400, "Mick Fournier"
wrote:

Danny,

Sedirea spelled backwards is Aerides. I bloomed an Aerides quinquevulnerum
var purpurea two weeks ago.

Click on:
http://personalpages.bellsouth.net/f...ridesquin1.jpg

I sell these in flask on my website.

If you can bloom Sedirea... then what's the big deal over blooming out
Neofinetia falcata?

Mick


Fabulous! Almost worth the fuss of a flask. I am not a seedling
person. My gh gets too cold at night.
SuE
http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/albums.php


  #21   Report Post  
Old 09-06-2005, 12:49 PM
Mick Fournier
 
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Sue,

Famed NF grower Cal Early in Korea likes to put them on top of a mound also
as I recall... good suggestion. I recently set one basket up of NF (Syoujou
Red x Amani Pink) using that mound concept with a ball of coconut fiber
(coir) below and it is working well also.

Mick

----------------------------

"Susan Erickson" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 8 Jun 2005 23:38:59 -0400, "Mick Fournier"
wrote:

Danny,

Neofinetia falcata don't grow in semi hydro or sphagnum moss east of the
Mississippi and south of the Mason-Dixon. I have seen only a couple of
California growers able to start and maintain some juveniles in sphagnum
moss and then only if the plastic pot is an airy web pot. You need a

teak
or cedar basket instead. Tie the plant firmly to the inside of the wood
basket and pop some chopped cubes of coarse coconut husk into the basket.

Mick


The basket I agree on - but I like to make it very small and prop
them high in the basket with moss under them - sort of the
traditional mound. When I had coarse husk in the basket they had
a tendency to settle down in below the top edge. Then they
pouted.
They are worth all the fuss Danny.
SuE
http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/albums.php



  #22   Report Post  
Old 09-06-2005, 01:32 PM
danny
 
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I guess I'll have to try the "mound of moss" in a small net pot. Thanks for
the suggestions.
-danny

"Mick Fournier" wrote in message
. ..
Sue,

Famed NF grower Cal Early in Korea likes to put them on top of a mound
also
as I recall... good suggestion. I recently set one basket up of NF
(Syoujou
Red x Amani Pink) using that mound concept with a ball of coconut fiber
(coir) below and it is working well also.

Mick

----------------------------

"Susan Erickson" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 8 Jun 2005 23:38:59 -0400, "Mick Fournier"
wrote:

Danny,

Neofinetia falcata don't grow in semi hydro or sphagnum moss east of the
Mississippi and south of the Mason-Dixon. I have seen only a couple of
California growers able to start and maintain some juveniles in sphagnum
moss and then only if the plastic pot is an airy web pot. You need a

teak
or cedar basket instead. Tie the plant firmly to the inside of the wood
basket and pop some chopped cubes of coarse coconut husk into the
basket.

Mick


The basket I agree on - but I like to make it very small and prop
them high in the basket with moss under them - sort of the
traditional mound. When I had coarse husk in the basket they had
a tendency to settle down in below the top edge. Then they
pouted.
They are worth all the fuss Danny.
SuE
http://orchids.legolas.org/gallery/albums.php





  #23   Report Post  
Old 09-06-2005, 01:43 PM
Rob
 
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Mick Fournier wrote:
Rob,

Yes, there is always one poucher in the group at the least. Ah well... in
due time you too shall come back into the fold where you belong. Some day I
will be posting blooming pictures of the Cattleya percivaliana coeruleas I
have in flask now and you too will succumb to the Cattleya siren.

Mick



Actually Mick (or anybody), what do you know about C. harrisoniae? I
have one that is blooming out an almost magenta, hot-pink kind of color.
Is that a real color for harrisoniae? These are out of a 'compot' (of
plants which were all blooming size) from Lenette's.

http://littlefrogfarm.com/images/C_harrisoniae.jpg

The photo makes it out to be far more blue than it actually is... It
does have a little bit of blue in the hot-pink.

--
Rob's Rules: http://littlefrogfarm.com
1) There is always room for one more orchid
2) There is always room for two more orchids
2a) See rule 1
3) When one has insufficient credit to obtain more
orchids, obtain more credit

  #24   Report Post  
Old 09-06-2005, 11:10 PM
Mick Fournier
 
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Dave,

I am sure the intellectual scientifcos will dispute my estimates with some
dam facts based on their old high school science books. You know, I always
hate to have to go and look at an intellectual scientifco's greenhouse to
give an opinion on something... all the plants look like dried up shit, but
they can sure quote the exact specifications for what technically "should
have grown" for them.

But I would hope for:

25% coerulea
25% semi alba
25% coerulescens
25% normal

My estimates are based on experience... not genetic theory.

Mick
www.OrchidFlask.com

=============================

"Dave S" wrote in message
ups.com...
Mick,

I'm not fully versed on Cattleya genetics. What color form(s) would you
expect from a cross of a coerulea on the semi-alba?

My Cattleya mossiae semi-alba didn't spike this year...probably upset
by our move last fall. It is absolutely stunning when it does...as is
the one in the photo you posted. Hard to beat those big, showy Cattleya
species.

Dave

Mick Fournier wrote:
Ray,

Ooooo Ray, that hurt. I am no longer a hybridizer. I put some pollen

from
a blue ribbon (2003 Redlands show) Cattleya mossiae var coerulea on this
plant and the pod has already started. I think that is going to be my

cross
of choice on this stud plant.

Mick




  #25   Report Post  
Old 10-06-2005, 03:29 AM
Ray
 
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Just teasing, Mick.. The cattleya is gorgeous and I hope that the
cross you are making blooms well and grows magnificently for you...
Have a great day...
Ray Lloyd

Mick Fournier wrote:

Ray,

Ooooo Ray, that hurt. I am no longer a hybridizer. I put some pollen


from

a blue ribbon (2003 Redlands show) Cattleya mossiae var coerulea on this
plant and the pod has already started. I think that is going to be my


cross

of choice on this stud plant.

Mick






  #26   Report Post  
Old 10-06-2005, 06:37 AM
Dave S
 
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Thanks Mick....experience wins over theory in the real world.

The few C. mossiae v. coerulea plants I have seen have smaller flowers
than the type or semi-albas, but the flowers lasted longer. I guess one
could hope for the best of all worlds to pass onto a few seedlings. Big
coeruleas and a semi-alba that lasts for a month!

Dave

  #27   Report Post  
Old 10-06-2005, 12:29 PM
Mick Fournier
 
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Dave,

Thaaaaaat's the new objective.

Mick

====================

"Dave S" wrote in message
oups.com...
Thanks Mick....experience wins over theory in the real world.

The few C. mossiae v. coerulea plants I have seen have smaller flowers
than the type or semi-albas, but the flowers lasted longer. I guess one
could hope for the best of all worlds to pass onto a few seedlings. Big
coeruleas and a semi-alba that lasts for a month!

Dave



  #28   Report Post  
Old 10-06-2005, 04:29 PM
Dave S
 
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I'll be in touch for a flask when they ready....

Dave



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