#31   Report Post  
Old 01-06-2005, 08:42 AM
pete
 
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Janet Baraclough wrote:

My sympathies over the salad tongs :-( , men should try that some
time, we'll see who's "new". Hope she improves soon


I can tell ya now ... and anyone else who cares to read ...if I had to
bear the children the human race would die out ...I know women say the
same thing regarding men giving birth and you get no argument from me.


At this point I just have to relate to you a paragraph found while
researching Australian history. It has nothing to do with childbirth but
has everything to do with women's lot in life.

Eyre was the acting Chief magistrate of the Murray district of South
Australia at the approximate time.

***************
Originally published with "Journals of expeditions of discovery into
Central Australia, and overland from Adelaide to King George's Sound, in
the years 1840-1".

An account of the manners and customs of the Aborigines and the state of
their relations with Europeans
by
Edward John Eyre


"Like most other savages the Australian looks upon his wife as a slave.
To her belongs the duty of collecting and preparing the daily food, of
making the camp or hut for the night, of gathering and bringing in
firewood, and of procuring water. She must also attend to the children;
and in travelling carry all the moveable property and frequently the
weapons of her husband. In wet weather she attends to all the outside
work, whilst her lord and master is snugly seated at the fire."

******************************

Oh how things have changed in the last 150 years :-) pass the remote
dear ...... I just had to post that for you and Fran cos I figured you
two would appreciate it .... although it has nothing to do with the
topic per se,(since when has that bothered me) Whilst reading it I
immediately thought "I know who'd appreciate that" :-) see how much I
thinks about ya's?


Are you the first grand-daddy on altpc? How sustainable is that?


I dunno if I am or not... sometimes it feels like I'm the only person
here let alone the only "aged" one.


I'm looking forward to the burping and farting contests, I used to have
em with his Mother but she grew out of em.



I always wonder how people manage to grow out of farting. You could
power a small village on our domestic windfarm.


I don't think it was the farting she grew out of ... just the
competitive aspect. :-)

pete

  #32   Report Post  
Old 03-07-2005, 06:14 AM
Judanne
 
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Here are a couple of links to an inspiring story I saw on Australian Story
last month. While its not completely devoted to salinity, it is about
drought proofing properties and preventing the problems caused by lack of
water.

http://www.abc.net.au/austory/content/2005/s1383562.htm (part 1)

http://www.abc.net.au/austory/content/2005/s1388590.htm (part 2)

Judanne
Tassie


"pete" wrote in message
...
Hi Folks
As some of you know this is a subject quite dear to me because of the
amount of salinity in and around where I live.

I've stated before that I don't believe salinity is THE problem but rather
A symptom of poor soil structure, and I'm increasingly frustrated when I
look for info on how salinity is being managed or addressed.

Most if not all the sources I can find on the net are government sponsored
surveys which seem intent on telling me how bad salinity is and why it's
such a problem and how they will continue to develop models to ascertain
the extent of salinity and how to recognise it ...etc etc etc ....... all
this is necessary I'm sure for the "experts" to gain an understanding of
the so called problem and to help others understand its devastating
effects, and I have no doubt that there are many many people receiving
government grants to fund these surveys and refine their models and salt
mapping diagrams.

Almost all of the info is negative and depressing and virtually states
that we are doomed to be swallowed up by mountains of salt unless we do
something ... the trouble is I can't actually find anyone who IS doing
anything other than devising yet another model or salt map for continued
monitoring ...of course all at great expense in the form of grant money
which ultimately gets passed onto the public in the form of levies and
surcharges.

My question is this .... does anyone know of any information on the net
which shows positive results from methods which can be applied by the
everyday person ?.

Most of the farming resources I read understandably deal with enabling the
farmer to still get a return from salt affected land whilst using
techniques to reduce high water tables and salt content, but I think thy
never actually address the real issue of soil structure Most of the
horticultural areas seem to be on land that is unaffected by salt so there
never seems to be a push within the smaller acreage groups or their
growers cooperatives to address the issue ...its left to the larger
properties and their organisations SAFF, NFF etc because (I presume) the
effects are more noticeable and have the most damage potential to our
primary production.

I don't want to learn how to grow salt tolerant species I already know
what plants will grow in some of the worst effected areas... I want to
create soil that will grow anything that my climate, as dry as it is, will
allow me to grow ...

I'm talking about practical people doing practical, positive things which
have yielded results however small a particular favourite of mine is the
"Greening the desert" by Geoff Lawton

http://www.abc.net.au/northcoast/stories/s727970.htm#

There are both flash presentations and real media version links.

This is the sort of info I'm looking for, I'm already getting some varied
success from trying different things ...as some of you know from my
postings here .... but I'm always looking for others sources of info ...
no more reports, studies or models from well intentioned government
sponsored surveys ... I feel like I've read all of em.

I wonder if anyone would be interested if I put together a simple web page
wiv piccies of my modest efforts in the hopes of helping others ?

stay well, stay happy folks

Pete



  #33   Report Post  
Old 03-07-2005, 06:26 AM
Judanne
 
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"Farm1" [email protected] wrote
(snip)
Pampas grass is also a noxious weed in some places but here where it is
rather colder than in the weed zones it is a (relatively) smallish and neat
garden clump of about 6 ft high.

Pretty cold here in Tassie, but its been a declared noxious weed here for
some time now.

Judanne
Tassie


  #34   Report Post  
Old 03-07-2005, 09:39 AM
david lloyd
 
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"Judanne" wrote in message
...

"Farm1" [email protected] wrote
(snip)
Pampas grass is also a noxious weed in some places but here where it is
rather colder than in the weed zones it is a (relatively) smallish and

neat
garden clump of about 6 ft high.

Pretty cold here in Tassie, but its been a declared noxious weed here for
some time now.

Judanne
Tassie

I had two clumps in my garden, left over from the previous owners. Neighbour
had his eye on one, so I let his and a friend of his dig it out. They did
this in one day.

I kept scratching my car on the other, as I pulled out the drive, so I
started to dig it out. I think it took me 3 years, in total.

I think it would have been easier to get rid of the car.


  #35   Report Post  
Old 04-07-2005, 11:37 AM
Chookie
 
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In article ,
"Judanne" wrote:

Here are a couple of links to an inspiring story I saw on Australian Story
last month. While its not completely devoted to salinity, it is about
drought proofing properties and preventing the problems caused by lack of
water.


Definite pc influence, isn't there? The idea of retaining the water and
putting it to work as much as possible, even though the pc books tend to
describe it in a European manner. And the concept of succession (though using
noxious weeds in the succession was not a way to win friends and influence
people!). Exciting stuff -- have any Aussie pcers on acreage been doing
anything with this information?

--
Chookie -- Sydney, Australia
(Replace "foulspambegone" with "optushome" to reply)

"In Melbourne there is plenty of vigour and eagerness, but there is
nothing worth being eager or vigorous about."
Francis Adams, The Australians, 1893.


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