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Old 29-06-2007, 04:30 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 14
Default Newby tomato question

I have about 20 tomato plants (planted outdoors in April) which are huge -
large plants, lots of leaf, very thick stems. They have flowers, but so far
have not set fruit.

I suspect the poor weather. I suspect, maybe excess nitrogen in the soil
(they are growing in new raised beds with a layer of manure, with
(Levington) compost on top).

Should I be worried? Or should I relax and wait for another month?

Should I put tomato fertilizer on them, or would it be better to let the
existing minerals leach out a bit to put them under some stress?

Any helpful comments gratefully received.

--

John


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Old 29-06-2007, 04:55 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 2,441
Default Newby tomato question


"John E" wrote in message
...
I have about 20 tomato plants (planted outdoors in April) which are huge -
large plants, lots of leaf, very thick stems. They have flowers, but so far
have not set fruit.

I suspect the poor weather. I suspect, maybe excess nitrogen in the soil
(they are growing in new raised beds with a layer of manure, with
(Levington) compost on top).

Should I be worried? Or should I relax and wait for another month?

Should I put tomato fertilizer on them, or would it be better to let the
existing minerals leach out a bit to put them under some stress?

Any helpful comments gratefully received.

--

John


In my experience if you have flowers you'll get fruit. They are VERY tiny
and green at first. Don't panic :-)

Mary


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Old 29-06-2007, 05:17 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 10
Default Newby tomato question


"John E" wrote in message
...
I have about 20 tomato plants (planted outdoors in April) which are huge -
large plants, lots of leaf, very thick stems. They have flowers, but so far
have not set fruit.

I suspect the poor weather. I suspect, maybe excess nitrogen in the soil
(they are growing in new raised beds with a layer of manure, with
(Levington) compost on top).

Should I be worried? Or should I relax and wait for another month?

Should I put tomato fertilizer on them, or would it be better to let the
existing minerals leach out a bit to put them under some stress?

Any helpful comments gratefully received.

--

John


Every morning I shake my tomato plants in the belief that the pollen is
givan an assist in "doing its duty".....H



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Old 29-06-2007, 08:42 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Newby tomato question

"Mary Fisher" wrote in message
. net...

"John E" wrote in message
...
I have about 20 tomato plants (planted outdoors in April) which are huge -
large plants, lots of leaf, very thick stems. They have flowers, but so
far have not set fruit.

I suspect the poor weather. I suspect, maybe excess nitrogen in the soil
(they are growing in new raised beds with a layer of manure, with
(Levington) compost on top).

Should I be worried? Or should I relax and wait for another month?

Should I put tomato fertilizer on them, or would it be better to let the
existing minerals leach out a bit to put them under some stress?

Any helpful comments gratefully received.

--

John


In my experience if you have flowers you'll get fruit. They are VERY tiny
and green at first. Don't panic :-)

Mary


Thanks, Mary.

--

John.

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Old 29-06-2007, 08:42 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Newby tomato question

"middleton.walker" wrote in message
. ..

"John E" wrote in message
...
I have about 20 tomato plants (planted outdoors in April) which are huge -
large plants, lots of leaf, very thick stems. They have flowers, but so
far have not set fruit.

I suspect the poor weather. I suspect, maybe excess nitrogen in the soil
(they are growing in new raised beds with a layer of manure, with
(Levington) compost on top).

Should I be worried? Or should I relax and wait for another month?

Should I put tomato fertilizer on them, or would it be better to let the
existing minerals leach out a bit to put them under some stress?

Any helpful comments gratefully received.

--

John


Every morning I shake my tomato plants in the belief that the pollen is
givan an assist in "doing its duty".....H




Thanks "H", I have been doing some shaking myself. I just need to keep the
faith.

--

John.



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Old 30-06-2007, 10:13 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 25
Default Newby tomato question

I have tomato plants both inside the greenhouse and outside. The ones inside
have set and are getting quite big but the ones outside are only just
starting. i shouldn't worry yet.
Mel.


"John E" wrote in message
...
"middleton.walker" wrote in message
. ..

"John E" wrote in message
...
I have about 20 tomato plants (planted outdoors in April) which are
huge - large plants, lots of leaf, very thick stems. They have flowers,
but so far have not set fruit.

I suspect the poor weather. I suspect, maybe excess nitrogen in the soil
(they are growing in new raised beds with a layer of manure, with
(Levington) compost on top).

Should I be worried? Or should I relax and wait for another month?

Should I put tomato fertilizer on them, or would it be better to let the
existing minerals leach out a bit to put them under some stress?

Any helpful comments gratefully received.

--

John


Every morning I shake my tomato plants in the belief that the pollen is
givan an assist in "doing its duty".....H




Thanks "H", I have been doing some shaking myself. I just need to keep the
faith.

--

John.



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Old 30-06-2007, 10:36 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Newby tomato question


"Mel" wrote in message
.uk...
I have tomato plants both inside the greenhouse and outside. The ones
inside have set and are getting quite big but the ones outside are only
just starting. i shouldn't worry yet.
Mel.


Yes, I noticed some eating sized (but still green) ones in the greenhouse
this morning.

I've never shaken a tomato yet! Well, not deliberately, I suppose i must
have caused movement when tying them to stakes or winding string round them.

Mary


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Old 02-07-2007, 10:41 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Newby tomato question


"Mary Fisher" wrote in message
et...

"Mel" wrote in message
.uk...
I have tomato plants both inside the greenhouse and outside. The ones
inside have set and are getting quite big but the ones outside are only
just starting. i shouldn't worry yet.
Mel.


Yes, I noticed some eating sized (but still green) ones in the greenhouse
this morning.

I've never shaken a tomato yet! Well, not deliberately, I suppose i must
have caused movement when tying them to stakes or winding string round
them.

Mary


Unfortunately I no longer have a greenhouse so must resort to starting
tomatoes in the cellar ...start the early ones around the end of february
and plant outside under a small plastic tent in mid May...to date have
picked two beauties...one around 10 ounces and the other around twenty
ounces...one slice make a beauty of a sandwich....H




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Old 04-07-2007, 10:27 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Newby tomato question


"middleton.walker" wrote in message
Unfortunately I no longer have a greenhouse so must resort to starting
tomatoes in the cellar ...start the early ones around the end of february
and plant outside under a small plastic tent in mid May...to date have
picked two beauties...one around 10 ounces and the other around twenty
ounces...one slice make a beauty of a sandwich....H





"Back in the real world" ! I find that the daily maintenance of the plants
in the greenhouse gives all the shaking of the plants that is necessary -
removal of surplus axil shoots is particularly rewarding.

Pete
www.thecanalshop.com


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Old 04-07-2007, 10:48 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Newby tomato question

"steve auvache" wrote in message
...
In article , Mary
Fisher writes

"John E" wrote in message
...
I have about 20 tomato plants (planted outdoors in April) which are
huge -
large plants, lots of leaf, very thick stems. They have flowers, but so
far
have not set fruit.

I suspect the poor weather. I suspect, maybe excess nitrogen in the soil
(they are growing in new raised beds with a layer of manure, with
(Levington) compost on top).

Should I be worried? Or should I relax and wait for another month?

Should I put tomato fertilizer on them, or would it be better to let the
existing minerals leach out a bit to put them under some stress?

Any helpful comments gratefully received.

--

John


In my experience if you have flowers you'll get fruit. They are VERY tiny
and green at first.


The term "63 days from flower to fruit" springs to mind, although I have
no idea if that refers to the flower first showing or final pollination.
either way it is a bit over 2 months.


Don't panic :-)


Good advice.

I now have a few small (5-6mm) fruits developing.

--

John.



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Old 06-07-2007, 10:37 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Posts: 51
Default Newby tomato question

In article , Mary
Fisher writes

"John E" wrote in message
...
I have about 20 tomato plants (planted outdoors in April) which are huge -
large plants, lots of leaf, very thick stems. They have flowers, but so far
have not set fruit.

I suspect the poor weather. I suspect, maybe excess nitrogen in the soil
(they are growing in new raised beds with a layer of manure, with
(Levington) compost on top).

Should I be worried? Or should I relax and wait for another month?

Should I put tomato fertilizer on them, or would it be better to let the
existing minerals leach out a bit to put them under some stress?

Any helpful comments gratefully received.

--

John


In my experience if you have flowers you'll get fruit. They are VERY tiny
and green at first.


The term "63 days from flower to fruit" springs to mind, although I have
no idea if that refers to the flower first showing or final pollination.
either way it is a bit over 2 months.


Don't panic :-)


Good advice.

--
steve auvache
The only good slug is the one now residing two doors up.


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