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Old 05-03-2004, 12:32 PM
Bob Hobden
 
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Default Garden lighting (cross posted)


"Neil wrote in message

I'm redesigning my back garden at the moment and my thoughts have turned
to lighting. I would like to illuminate the terrace which is just to the
rear of the house, but also I'm considering some path lighting and maybe
some accent lighting to highlight specimen trees, planting groups etc.
This would mainly be for use during the summer but occasionally we would
switch the lights on at other times, for effect.

I live in a rural village so I'm conscious of light pollution and don't
really want to brighten the night sky which could affect other locals.

I'll discuss my plans with my neighbours before I go ahead but I have a
number of questions initially:-

What is best practice regarding this kind of lighting?

Mains voltage, low voltage or a mixture?

Is this a daft idea and I should forget about it?


We have had low voltage garden lighting on automatic control for years. You
can install a low voltage system yourself easily but to use mains voltage
you would need the expertise of an experienced and qualified electrician.
Disadvantages with low voltage (24v) are that you can only put so many
lights on each transformer so for a lot of lights you would need more than
one system or obtain a more power transformer.
Try talking to your local proper electrical supplies co. the sort of place
electricians go to get their stuff. Don't bother with Garden Centres or
Sheds.

--
Regards
Bob

Use a useful Screen Saver...
http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/
and find intelligent life amongst the stars






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Old 05-03-2004, 01:01 PM
Bob Hobden
 
Posts: n/a
Default Garden lighting (cross posted)


"Neil wrote in message

I'm redesigning my back garden at the moment and my thoughts have turned
to lighting. I would like to illuminate the terrace which is just to the
rear of the house, but also I'm considering some path lighting and maybe
some accent lighting to highlight specimen trees, planting groups etc.
This would mainly be for use during the summer but occasionally we would
switch the lights on at other times, for effect.

I live in a rural village so I'm conscious of light pollution and don't
really want to brighten the night sky which could affect other locals.

I'll discuss my plans with my neighbours before I go ahead but I have a
number of questions initially:-

What is best practice regarding this kind of lighting?

Mains voltage, low voltage or a mixture?

Is this a daft idea and I should forget about it?


We have had low voltage garden lighting on automatic control for years. You
can install a low voltage system yourself easily but to use mains voltage
you would need the expertise of an experienced and qualified electrician.
Disadvantages with low voltage (24v) are that you can only put so many
lights on each transformer so for a lot of lights you would need more than
one system or obtain a more power transformer.
Try talking to your local proper electrical supplies co. the sort of place
electricians go to get their stuff. Don't bother with Garden Centres or
Sheds.

--
Regards
Bob

Use a useful Screen Saver...
http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/
and find intelligent life amongst the stars





  #3   Report Post  
Old 05-03-2004, 05:02 PM
Edwin Spector
 
Posts: n/a
Default Garden lighting (cross posted)

Good questions. Re light pollution avoidance, don't use up-lights on trees and
stuff. Much of the light goes straight into the sky.

Lots of resources available at http://www.dark-skies.org/
Specifically, advice from the The Institution of Lighting Engineers, available
at http://www.star.le.ac.uk/~dbl/cfds/ile-gd-e.htm

Regards

Edwin
Bath.
-------



Neil Jones wrote:
...
I'm redesigning my back garden at the moment and my thoughts have turned
to lighting. I would like to illuminate the terrace which is just to the
rear of the house, but also I'm considering some path lighting and maybe
some accent lighting to highlight specimen trees, planting groups etc.
This would mainly be for use during the summer but occasionally we would
switch the lights on at other times, for effect.

I live in a rural village so I'm conscious of light pollution and don't
really want to brighten the night sky which could affect other locals.
...

  #4   Report Post  
Old 05-03-2004, 11:38 PM
Jaques d'Alltrades
 
Posts: n/a
Default Garden lighting (cross posted)

The message
from "Neil Jones" contains these words:

I live in a rural village so I'm conscious of light pollution and don't
really want to brighten the night sky which could affect other locals.


I'll discuss my plans with my neighbours before I go ahead but I have a
number of questions initially:-


What is best practice regarding this kind of lighting?


Mains voltage, low voltage or a mixture?


Is this a daft idea and I should forget about it?


Have you thought about those individual solar-powered units? Most garden
centres and many DIY shops stock them.

They give enough light to see the paths by, and any hedgehogs, cats or
whatnot, waiting to trip you up. Light pollution isn't an issue with
these....

--
Rusty
Open the creaking gate to make a horrid.squeak, then lower the foobar.
http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/hi-fi/
  #5   Report Post  
Old 05-03-2004, 11:39 PM
Jaques d'Alltrades
 
Posts: n/a
Default Garden lighting (cross posted)

The message
from "Neil Jones" contains these words:

I live in a rural village so I'm conscious of light pollution and don't
really want to brighten the night sky which could affect other locals.


I'll discuss my plans with my neighbours before I go ahead but I have a
number of questions initially:-


What is best practice regarding this kind of lighting?


Mains voltage, low voltage or a mixture?


Is this a daft idea and I should forget about it?


Have you thought about those individual solar-powered units? Most garden
centres and many DIY shops stock them.

They give enough light to see the paths by, and any hedgehogs, cats or
whatnot, waiting to trip you up. Light pollution isn't an issue with
these....

--
Rusty
Open the creaking gate to make a horrid.squeak, then lower the foobar.
http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/hi-fi/


  #6   Report Post  
Old 05-03-2004, 11:47 PM
Neil Jones
 
Posts: n/a
Default Garden lighting (cross posted)


"Jaques d'Alltrades" wrote in
message ...
The message
from "Neil Jones" contains these words:

I live in a rural village so I'm conscious of light pollution and

don't
really want to brighten the night sky which could affect other

locals.

I'll discuss my plans with my neighbours before I go ahead but I

have a
number of questions initially:-


What is best practice regarding this kind of lighting?


Mains voltage, low voltage or a mixture?


Is this a daft idea and I should forget about it?


Have you thought about those individual solar-powered units? Most

garden
centres and many DIY shops stock them.

They give enough light to see the paths by, and any hedgehogs, cats or
whatnot, waiting to trip you up. Light pollution isn't an issue with
these....

--

Hmm, yes. I was given some of these a couple of years ago. Very little
light output indeed. I could use them to light the path, as you say, but
not much else :-)

Neil


  #7   Report Post  
Old 05-03-2004, 11:47 PM
Neil Jones
 
Posts: n/a
Default Garden lighting (cross posted)


"Jaques d'Alltrades" wrote in
message ...
The message
from "Neil Jones" contains these words:

I live in a rural village so I'm conscious of light pollution and

don't
really want to brighten the night sky which could affect other

locals.

I'll discuss my plans with my neighbours before I go ahead but I

have a
number of questions initially:-


What is best practice regarding this kind of lighting?


Mains voltage, low voltage or a mixture?


Is this a daft idea and I should forget about it?


Have you thought about those individual solar-powered units? Most

garden
centres and many DIY shops stock them.

They give enough light to see the paths by, and any hedgehogs, cats or
whatnot, waiting to trip you up. Light pollution isn't an issue with
these....

--

Hmm, yes. I was given some of these a couple of years ago. Very little
light output indeed. I could use them to light the path, as you say, but
not much else :-)

Neil


  #8   Report Post  
Old 05-03-2004, 11:49 PM
Neil Jones
 
Posts: n/a
Default Garden lighting (cross posted)


"Edwin Spector" wrote in message
...
Good questions. Re light pollution avoidance, don't use up-lights on

trees and
stuff. Much of the light goes straight into the sky.

Lots of resources available at http://www.dark-skies.org/
Specifically, advice from the The Institution of Lighting Engineers,

available
at http://www.star.le.ac.uk/~dbl/cfds/ile-gd-e.htm

Regards

Edwin
Bath.
-------

Thanks, I'll have look at their recommendations.

Neil


  #9   Report Post  
Old 05-03-2004, 11:49 PM
Neil Jones
 
Posts: n/a
Default Garden lighting (cross posted)


"Edwin Spector" wrote in message
...
Good questions. Re light pollution avoidance, don't use up-lights on

trees and
stuff. Much of the light goes straight into the sky.

Lots of resources available at http://www.dark-skies.org/
Specifically, advice from the The Institution of Lighting Engineers,

available
at http://www.star.le.ac.uk/~dbl/cfds/ile-gd-e.htm

Regards

Edwin
Bath.
-------

Thanks, I'll have look at their recommendations.

Neil


  #10   Report Post  
Old 05-03-2004, 11:54 PM
Neil Jones
 
Posts: n/a
Default Garden lighting (cross posted)


"Bob Hobden" wrote in message
...

"Neil wrote in message

I'm redesigning my back garden at the moment and my thoughts have

turned
to lighting. I would like to illuminate the terrace which is just to

the
rear of the house, but also I'm considering some path lighting and

maybe
some accent lighting to highlight specimen trees, planting groups

etc.
This would mainly be for use during the summer but occasionally we

would
switch the lights on at other times, for effect.

I live in a rural village so I'm conscious of light pollution and

don't
really want to brighten the night sky which could affect other

locals.

I'll discuss my plans with my neighbours before I go ahead but I

have a
number of questions initially:-

What is best practice regarding this kind of lighting?

Mains voltage, low voltage or a mixture?

Is this a daft idea and I should forget about it?


We have had low voltage garden lighting on automatic control for

years. You
can install a low voltage system yourself easily but to use mains

voltage
you would need the expertise of an experienced and qualified

electrician.
Disadvantages with low voltage (24v) are that you can only put so many
lights on each transformer so for a lot of lights you would need more

than
one system or obtain a more power transformer.
Try talking to your local proper electrical supplies co. the sort of

place
electricians go to get their stuff. Don't bother with Garden Centres

or
Sheds.


OK, low voltage in the garden makes sense. Presumably I can use mains
voltage fittings attached to the house to iluminate the terrace.

I had a look at TLC but very little on there, really. Is this a niche
market (ie expensive)?

Thanks

Neil




  #11   Report Post  
Old 05-03-2004, 11:54 PM
Neil Jones
 
Posts: n/a
Default Garden lighting (cross posted)


"Bob Hobden" wrote in message
...

"Neil wrote in message

I'm redesigning my back garden at the moment and my thoughts have

turned
to lighting. I would like to illuminate the terrace which is just to

the
rear of the house, but also I'm considering some path lighting and

maybe
some accent lighting to highlight specimen trees, planting groups

etc.
This would mainly be for use during the summer but occasionally we

would
switch the lights on at other times, for effect.

I live in a rural village so I'm conscious of light pollution and

don't
really want to brighten the night sky which could affect other

locals.

I'll discuss my plans with my neighbours before I go ahead but I

have a
number of questions initially:-

What is best practice regarding this kind of lighting?

Mains voltage, low voltage or a mixture?

Is this a daft idea and I should forget about it?


We have had low voltage garden lighting on automatic control for

years. You
can install a low voltage system yourself easily but to use mains

voltage
you would need the expertise of an experienced and qualified

electrician.
Disadvantages with low voltage (24v) are that you can only put so many
lights on each transformer so for a lot of lights you would need more

than
one system or obtain a more power transformer.
Try talking to your local proper electrical supplies co. the sort of

place
electricians go to get their stuff. Don't bother with Garden Centres

or
Sheds.


OK, low voltage in the garden makes sense. Presumably I can use mains
voltage fittings attached to the house to iluminate the terrace.

I had a look at TLC but very little on there, really. Is this a niche
market (ie expensive)?

Thanks

Neil


  #12   Report Post  
Old 06-03-2004, 12:01 AM
martin
 
Posts: n/a
Default Garden lighting (cross posted)

On Fri, 5 Mar 2004 16:36:46 -0000, "Neil Jones"
wrote:


"Jaques d'Alltrades" wrote in
message ...
The message
from "Neil Jones" contains these words:

I live in a rural village so I'm conscious of light pollution and

don't
really want to brighten the night sky which could affect other

locals.

I'll discuss my plans with my neighbours before I go ahead but I

have a
number of questions initially:-


What is best practice regarding this kind of lighting?


Mains voltage, low voltage or a mixture?


Is this a daft idea and I should forget about it?


Have you thought about those individual solar-powered units? Most

garden
centres and many DIY shops stock them.

They give enough light to see the paths by, and any hedgehogs, cats or
whatnot, waiting to trip you up. Light pollution isn't an issue with
these....

--

Hmm, yes. I was given some of these a couple of years ago. Very little
light output indeed. I could use them to light the path, as you say, but
not much else :-)


The rechargeable batteries in them soon died too.
--

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit;
Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad
  #13   Report Post  
Old 06-03-2004, 12:01 AM
martin
 
Posts: n/a
Default Garden lighting (cross posted)

On Fri, 5 Mar 2004 16:36:46 -0000, "Neil Jones"
wrote:


"Jaques d'Alltrades" wrote in
message ...
The message
from "Neil Jones" contains these words:

I live in a rural village so I'm conscious of light pollution and

don't
really want to brighten the night sky which could affect other

locals.

I'll discuss my plans with my neighbours before I go ahead but I

have a
number of questions initially:-


What is best practice regarding this kind of lighting?


Mains voltage, low voltage or a mixture?


Is this a daft idea and I should forget about it?


Have you thought about those individual solar-powered units? Most

garden
centres and many DIY shops stock them.

They give enough light to see the paths by, and any hedgehogs, cats or
whatnot, waiting to trip you up. Light pollution isn't an issue with
these....

--

Hmm, yes. I was given some of these a couple of years ago. Very little
light output indeed. I could use them to light the path, as you say, but
not much else :-)


The rechargeable batteries in them soon died too.
--

Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit;
Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad
  #14   Report Post  
Old 06-03-2004, 04:32 AM
nightjar
 
Posts: n/a
Default Garden lighting (cross posted)


"Neil Jones" wrote in message
...
I've cross posted this to uk.rec.gardening and uk.d-i-y because I
believe it's on topic for both groups.

I'm redesigning my back garden at the moment and my thoughts have turned
to lighting. I would like to illuminate the terrace which is just to the
rear of the house, but also I'm considering some path lighting and maybe
some accent lighting to highlight specimen trees, planting groups etc.
This would mainly be for use during the summer but occasionally we would
switch the lights on at other times, for effect.

I live in a rural village so I'm conscious of light pollution and don't
really want to brighten the night sky which could affect other locals.

I'll discuss my plans with my neighbours before I go ahead but I have a
number of questions initially:-

What is best practice regarding this kind of lighting?

Mains voltage, low voltage or a mixture?


I favour mains voltage, which is perfectly safe if you follow the correct
wiring practices and protect the circuit with a 30mA RCD or RCBO (dearer but
only one circuit trips at a time). I find that low voltage lamps don't seem
to have much of a life expectancy. However, I would consider some of the
solar powered LED lamps for path edge markers. They don't give much light,
but do show you where the path is.

My favourite light for something like your terrace is a low energy
floodlamp, made for commercial sign illumination, which I buy from Newey &
Eyre. They use 2 x 9W (or 4 x 9W, also 4 x 9W with an integral photocell)
lamps in a floodlight format, with very good cut-off characteristics, so you
don't get light spill where you don't want it. Mounted below eye level, one
of those washes the ground with light, which allows you to see to walk over
quite a large area. Mounted high, you get can a good area illumination from
one.

For accent lighting, I suggest low energy bulkhead lights. I use those quite
a lot outside and, if I don't want the light going in a particular direction
from one, I coat the relevant bit of the inside of the cover with a metallic
spray paint.

The main thing to remember is that outside, you need very little light to be
able to see quite well, so don't overdo the amount of lighting.

Colin Bignell


  #15   Report Post  
Old 06-03-2004, 04:32 AM
nightjar
 
Posts: n/a
Default Garden lighting (cross posted)


"Neil Jones" wrote in message
...
I've cross posted this to uk.rec.gardening and uk.d-i-y because I
believe it's on topic for both groups.

I'm redesigning my back garden at the moment and my thoughts have turned
to lighting. I would like to illuminate the terrace which is just to the
rear of the house, but also I'm considering some path lighting and maybe
some accent lighting to highlight specimen trees, planting groups etc.
This would mainly be for use during the summer but occasionally we would
switch the lights on at other times, for effect.

I live in a rural village so I'm conscious of light pollution and don't
really want to brighten the night sky which could affect other locals.

I'll discuss my plans with my neighbours before I go ahead but I have a
number of questions initially:-

What is best practice regarding this kind of lighting?

Mains voltage, low voltage or a mixture?


I favour mains voltage, which is perfectly safe if you follow the correct
wiring practices and protect the circuit with a 30mA RCD or RCBO (dearer but
only one circuit trips at a time). I find that low voltage lamps don't seem
to have much of a life expectancy. However, I would consider some of the
solar powered LED lamps for path edge markers. They don't give much light,
but do show you where the path is.

My favourite light for something like your terrace is a low energy
floodlamp, made for commercial sign illumination, which I buy from Newey &
Eyre. They use 2 x 9W (or 4 x 9W, also 4 x 9W with an integral photocell)
lamps in a floodlight format, with very good cut-off characteristics, so you
don't get light spill where you don't want it. Mounted below eye level, one
of those washes the ground with light, which allows you to see to walk over
quite a large area. Mounted high, you get can a good area illumination from
one.

For accent lighting, I suggest low energy bulkhead lights. I use those quite
a lot outside and, if I don't want the light going in a particular direction
from one, I coat the relevant bit of the inside of the cover with a metallic
spray paint.

The main thing to remember is that outside, you need very little light to be
able to see quite well, so don't overdo the amount of lighting.

Colin Bignell




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