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Old 07-11-2019, 02:01 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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snow already. was hoping to get more work done on
this project and i may be able to tomorrow and the
next day, but then next week we're getting temperatures
in the teens overnight and no days above freezing so
this may be the end of it until spring.

i'm still hoping we get a warmer snap in the next
few weeks though. it would be nice to stop what i'm
working on at a better breaking point than now.

i have one and a half of drain tubes to lift out of
a garden and get them moved and then all the pea gravel
scraped up and put on top of the drain tubes along with
all the pea gravel dredged out of the trenches too so
i can fill those trenches back in and get that garden
ready for winter.

otherwise things going pretty good here. most of the
gardens are ready for winter.

might get a new camera today - gotta get some bean
pictures taken!


songbird

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Old 07-11-2019, 06:34 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 11/7/2019 8:01 AM, songbird wrote:
snow already. was hoping to get more work done on
this project and i may be able to tomorrow and the
next day, but then next week we're getting temperatures
in the teens overnight and no days above freezing so
this may be the end of it until spring.

i'm still hoping we get a warmer snap in the next
few weeks though. it would be nice to stop what i'm
working on at a better breaking point than now.

i have one and a half of drain tubes to lift out of
a garden and get them moved and then all the pea gravel
scraped up and put on top of the drain tubes along with
all the pea gravel dredged out of the trenches too so
i can fill those trenches back in and get that garden
ready for winter.

otherwise things going pretty good here. most of the
gardens are ready for winter.

might get a new camera today - gotta get some bean
pictures taken!


songbird


Our gardening was a few tomatoes and my chestnut crop. Now most of the
leaves I need to rake are gone, gutters cleaned, and I told the lawn
crew I no longer needed them for the year.
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Old 08-11-2019, 03:07 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Frank wrote:
....
Our gardening was a few tomatoes and my chestnut crop. Now most of the
leaves I need to rake are gone, gutters cleaned, and I told the lawn
crew I no longer needed them for the year.


we are the lawn crew, not much lawn left and the
leaves that fall can mostly stay where they land.

sun is out now, but it was cold overnight.


songbird
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Old 08-11-2019, 05:49 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 11/8/2019 8:07 AM, songbird wrote:
Frank wrote:
...
Our gardening was a few tomatoes and my chestnut crop. Now most of the
leaves I need to rake are gone, gutters cleaned, and I told the lawn
crew I no longer needed them for the year.

we are the lawn crew, not much lawn left and the
leaves that fall can mostly stay where they land.

sun is out now, but it was cold overnight.


songbird


* Sunny here now too , after a couple of days of soaking rain . Last
night's low was in the mid-20's here , pretty frosty ! I just calculated
how much firewood I have now , with what I just split and stacked I'm
right at 5 cords now . Hope that's enough , they say mild temps and wet
winter here but I don't believe them ... Time to plant some garlic !

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !

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Old 08-11-2019, 06:08 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 11/8/2019 9:07 AM, songbird wrote:
Frank wrote:
...
Our gardening was a few tomatoes and my chestnut crop. Now most of the
leaves I need to rake are gone, gutters cleaned, and I told the lawn
crew I no longer needed them for the year.


we are the lawn crew, not much lawn left and the
leaves that fall can mostly stay where they land.

sun is out now, but it was cold overnight.


songbird


I was too up until a couple of years ago. We live in a hilly area. My
lot drops about 40 feet from highest part above to lowest below. I had
to use a self propelled mower as a rider could turn over on the down
slope. Worst was back yard where neighbors on both sides do not cut but
my wife wanted ours cut. So I got a lawn crew as do half my
neighborhood. I still do leaves and clean gutters.


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Old 09-11-2019, 02:16 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Terry Coombs wrote:
....
* Sunny here now too , after a couple of days of soaking rain . Last
night's low was in the mid-20's here , pretty frosty ! I just calculated
how much firewood I have now , with what I just split and stacked I'm
right at 5 cords now . Hope that's enough , they say mild temps and wet
winter here but I don't believe them ... Time to plant some garlic !


we have next Tues evening forecast to get down to 11F.

today is supposed to be around 40F and partly sunny
later. windy. ugh.

i don't think i'm going to get work done on the project
as i'd like because it is snowing out at the moment. just
a little dusting, but that makes it too slippery out there
and dangerous as i have to walk along a sloped edge of weed
barrier and black plastic to wheel the barrow.

it would be nice to get the project further along but i'm
just not in the mood for fighting the cold and the wind.


songbird
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Old 09-11-2019, 02:23 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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Frank wrote:
....
I was too up until a couple of years ago. We live in a hilly area. My
lot drops about 40 feet from highest part above to lowest below. I had
to use a self propelled mower as a rider could turn over on the down
slope. Worst was back yard where neighbors on both sides do not cut but
my wife wanted ours cut. So I got a lawn crew as do half my
neighborhood. I still do leaves and clean gutters.


not much for hills here unless they are man-made.
that is true of our property too. the change in
elevation for most of it is about a foot or two but
we had to bring in some fill when building for the
septic drain field (clay doesn't drain very fast) so
that is the highest part.

we are not too far in elevation above the level of Lake
Huron/Michigan and we lose about half of the difference
within half a mile. so that means for the next 29
miles the land only drops another 15 feet.

this area used to be an inland sea/swampy area. there
is coal and salt veins under us among the glacial till.
flat and mundane agricultural area with some forest lands
that have regrown since they were initially cleared.


songbird
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Old 09-11-2019, 02:30 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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wrote:
....
So far this fall, we've had pleasant-enough weather, even a bit too
warm for some folks. Despite a few cooler nights, days have been in or
very near low-to-mid 80's. Today, though, a so-called "cold front" is
slowly passing through, bringing intermittently overcast skies, slightly
increased chances for rain and a vague hint of cooler temperatures for
the weekend and/or early next week
https://forecast.weather.gov/MapClic...40243931149797.
We're still a couple of months from freezing temperatures, although,
much to our surprise, they have come as early as December.


i'm not sure if any of this coming cold snap will make it
all the way down there, but 11F is pretty cold this early
here. ah, i see, you'll have a 42F degree difference between
us and down there. no frost in that forecast for that night.


No fall garden in yet, although, there's still time for spinach,
turnips, mustard, carrots, onions and (maybe) peas. I'll probably plant
the peas, anyway, despite the "maybe. The yield will be determined, in
no small part, by the onset of freezing overnight temperatures. In that
department not even The Shadow knows. Clearing the area and preparing
the beds has become a (I hope) surmountable obstacle. Not to place
inordinate emphasis on one's infirmities but much of the time my left
arm, hand and fingers seem to be wired into someone else's nervous
system. Dr. Strangelove, indeed....


i hope you can manage it no matter what. nothing i'm
doing is critical now but it would be nice to have more of the
project done before winter sets in.

i did get a new camera at last so that will be something to
work with this winter. i even splurged for a macro lens so i
can get pics of tiny things if i want. much to learn and have
fun with along with getting things set up so i can get decent
pictures of the beanos.


songbird
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Old 09-11-2019, 02:53 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 11/9/2019 7:16 AM, songbird wrote:
Terry Coombs wrote:
...
* Sunny here now too , after a couple of days of soaking rain . Last
night's low was in the mid-20's here , pretty frosty ! I just calculated
how much firewood I have now , with what I just split and stacked I'm
right at 5 cords now . Hope that's enough , they say mild temps and wet
winter here but I don't believe them ... Time to plant some garlic !

we have next Tues evening forecast to get down to 11F.

today is supposed to be around 40F and partly sunny
later. windy. ugh.

i don't think i'm going to get work done on the project
as i'd like because it is snowing out at the moment. just
a little dusting, but that makes it too slippery out there
and dangerous as i have to walk along a sloped edge of weed
barrier and black plastic to wheel the barrow.

it would be nice to get the project further along but i'm
just not in the mood for fighting the cold and the wind.


songbird


*Can't say as I blame you ... as soon as the frost melts I'll be
heading out to load up my trailer with more fire wood . This gig has
been very very good for my wood pile , gotten around 2 cords from this
lady's property and a lot easier than from my woods . The final tree was
a monster white oak , 30+" at the base . Not real tall but very full
since it was out alone . By the time I finish this one I'll be well over
my goal of 5 cords by Thanksgiving .

--
Snag
Yes , I'm old
and crochety - and armed .
Get outta my woods !

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Old 09-11-2019, 08:48 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 11/9/2019 8:23 AM, songbird wrote:
Frank wrote:
...
I was too up until a couple of years ago. We live in a hilly area. My
lot drops about 40 feet from highest part above to lowest below. I had
to use a self propelled mower as a rider could turn over on the down
slope. Worst was back yard where neighbors on both sides do not cut but
my wife wanted ours cut. So I got a lawn crew as do half my
neighborhood. I still do leaves and clean gutters.


not much for hills here unless they are man-made.
that is true of our property too. the change in
elevation for most of it is about a foot or two but
we had to bring in some fill when building for the
septic drain field (clay doesn't drain very fast) so
that is the highest part.

we are not too far in elevation above the level of Lake
Huron/Michigan and we lose about half of the difference
within half a mile. so that means for the next 29
miles the land only drops another 15 feet.

this area used to be an inland sea/swampy area. there
is coal and salt veins under us among the glacial till.
flat and mundane agricultural area with some forest lands
that have regrown since they were initially cleared.


songbird


Most of Delaware is near sea level but in the northern part where I live
maximum elevation is about 450 ft. I think we are about 350. Not
mountainous but hilly. My two septic fields are evaporation beds as
there are probably clay layers limiting the perk. Probably a good thing
as two neighbors had to shell out $25,000 each when they sold their
houses to put in grey water treatment tanks to remove metals and
bacteria before going to their drain fields where the perk was probably
too good.

Funny in my front yard the perk must be good compared to the back
because I needed a new well dug this year and it was all porous rock.

I had a friend heavily into gardening and he said were were at about the
best climate for growing a large variety of things.


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Old 10-11-2019, 03:30 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On Saturday, November 9, 2019 at 2:48:27 PM UTC-5, Frank wrote:
On 11/9/2019 8:23 AM, songbird wrote:
Frank wrote:
...
I was too up until a couple of years ago. We live in a hilly area. My
lot drops about 40 feet from highest part above to lowest below. I had
to use a self propelled mower as a rider could turn over on the down
slope. Worst was back yard where neighbors on both sides do not cut but
my wife wanted ours cut. So I got a lawn crew as do half my
neighborhood. I still do leaves and clean gutters.


not much for hills here unless they are man-made.
that is true of our property too. the change in
elevation for most of it is about a foot or two but
we had to bring in some fill when building for the
septic drain field (clay doesn't drain very fast) so
that is the highest part.

we are not too far in elevation above the level of Lake
Huron/Michigan and we lose about half of the difference
within half a mile. so that means for the next 29
miles the land only drops another 15 feet.

this area used to be an inland sea/swampy area. there
is coal and salt veins under us among the glacial till.
flat and mundane agricultural area with some forest lands
that have regrown since they were initially cleared.


songbird


Most of Delaware is near sea level but in the northern part where I live
maximum elevation is about 450 ft. I think we are about 350. Not
mountainous but hilly. My two septic fields are evaporation beds as
there are probably clay layers limiting the perk. Probably a good thing
as two neighbors had to shell out $25,000 each when they sold their
houses to put in grey water treatment tanks to remove metals and
bacteria before going to their drain fields where the perk was probably
too good.

Funny in my front yard the perk must be good compared to the back
because I needed a new well dug this year and it was all porous rock.

I had a friend heavily into gardening and he said were were at about the
best climate for growing a large variety of things.


We're in Maryland about five miles in from the western shore of northern Chesapeake Bay; we get a pretty good growing season here for a large variety also. It's gotten cold recently but the relatively warm water in the Bay helps moderate things a bit for us.
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Old 11-11-2019, 12:48 AM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 11/10/2019 9:30 AM, Pavel314 wrote:
On Saturday, November 9, 2019 at 2:48:27 PM UTC-5, Frank wrote:
On 11/9/2019 8:23 AM, songbird wrote:
Frank wrote:
...
I was too up until a couple of years ago. We live in a hilly area. My
lot drops about 40 feet from highest part above to lowest below. I had
to use a self propelled mower as a rider could turn over on the down
slope. Worst was back yard where neighbors on both sides do not cut but
my wife wanted ours cut. So I got a lawn crew as do half my
neighborhood. I still do leaves and clean gutters.

not much for hills here unless they are man-made.
that is true of our property too. the change in
elevation for most of it is about a foot or two but
we had to bring in some fill when building for the
septic drain field (clay doesn't drain very fast) so
that is the highest part.

we are not too far in elevation above the level of Lake
Huron/Michigan and we lose about half of the difference
within half a mile. so that means for the next 29
miles the land only drops another 15 feet.

this area used to be an inland sea/swampy area. there
is coal and salt veins under us among the glacial till.
flat and mundane agricultural area with some forest lands
that have regrown since they were initially cleared.


songbird


Most of Delaware is near sea level but in the northern part where I live
maximum elevation is about 450 ft. I think we are about 350. Not
mountainous but hilly. My two septic fields are evaporation beds as
there are probably clay layers limiting the perk. Probably a good thing
as two neighbors had to shell out $25,000 each when they sold their
houses to put in grey water treatment tanks to remove metals and
bacteria before going to their drain fields where the perk was probably
too good.

Funny in my front yard the perk must be good compared to the back
because I needed a new well dug this year and it was all porous rock.

I had a friend heavily into gardening and he said were were at about the
best climate for growing a large variety of things.


We're in Maryland about five miles in from the western shore of northern Chesapeake Bay; we get a pretty good growing season here for a large variety also. It's gotten cold recently but the relatively warm water in the Bay helps moderate things a bit for us.


Stats in Delaware show temperature is more moderate near the coast too,
cooler summers and warmer winters.
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Old 12-11-2019, 12:07 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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On 11/7/19 5:01 AM, songbird wrote:
snow already. was hoping to get more work done on
this project and i may be able to tomorrow and the
next day, but then next week we're getting temperatures
in the teens overnight and no days above freezing so
this may be the end of it until spring.

i'm still hoping we get a warmer snap in the next
few weeks though. it would be nice to stop what i'm
working on at a better breaking point than now.

i have one and a half of drain tubes to lift out of
a garden and get them moved and then all the pea gravel
scraped up and put on top of the drain tubes along with
all the pea gravel dredged out of the trenches too so
i can fill those trenches back in and get that garden
ready for winter.

otherwise things going pretty good here. most of the
gardens are ready for winter.

might get a new camera today - gotta get some bean
pictures taken!


songbird


Hi Songbird,

So cold here at night that even the weeds are dying!
But, oh my gosh, the pollen!!!! (I finally found
something that works on the hay fever: Seven Forest
Xanthium 12.)

We have hit single digits already.

And zero rain/snow. I water my garlic and berries
once a week.

Day time gets in the sixties (F)

-T

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Old 12-11-2019, 02:54 PM posted to rec.gardens.edible
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T wrote:
....
So cold here at night that even the weeds are dying!
But, oh my gosh, the pollen!!!! (I finally found
something that works on the hay fever: Seven Forest
Xanthium 12.)

We have hit single digits already.


tonight's forecast is for 5F with windchill below
zero.


And zero rain/snow. I water my garlic and berries
once a week.

Day time gets in the sixties (F)


i'd love it to see those temperatures again as then
i could get those projects moved further along.


songbird


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