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Old 20-06-2006, 05:54 AM posted to triangle.gardens
Susan Hogarth
 
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Default Japanese Maple

I have a lovely japanese maple sitting close to our large magnolia and
a spot we would like to use for more vegetable gardening. My husband
suggested cutting down the maple, which I would not allow, of course.
*However*, I am really not that attached to the maple, which was here
when we moved in six years ago. I would be willing to find it a new
home, especially if someone wanted to pay for it.

Is it feasible to move a tree that is well over ten years old? (canopy
spread is probably over 10 feet across, although I'm a not a great
judge of distances). Would a nursery possibly pay for the tree?

- Susan


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Old 20-06-2006, 02:27 PM posted to triangle.gardens
Hey, It's Me!
 
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Default Japanese Maple

I don't know if a nursery would buy the tree or not, but I do know that
June, July, August are not the best time to move a tree. If you move
it now, there is a very good chance that it'll die. On the other hand,
eventually it'll be a problem anyway, sitting too close to another
tree. If it were me, I'd move it in the fall or spring.



Susan Hogarth wrote:
I have a lovely japanese maple sitting close to our large magnolia and
a spot we would like to use for more vegetable gardening. My husband
suggested cutting down the maple, which I would not allow, of course.
*However*, I am really not that attached to the maple, which was here
when we moved in six years ago. I would be willing to find it a new
home, especially if someone wanted to pay for it.

Is it feasible to move a tree that is well over ten years old? (canopy
spread is probably over 10 feet across, although I'm a not a great
judge of distances). Would a nursery possibly pay for the tree?

- Susan


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Old 20-06-2006, 04:29 PM posted to triangle.gardens
jim frei
 
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Default Japanese Maple

"Susan Hogarth" wrote in message
ups.com...
I have a lovely japanese maple sitting close to our large magnolia and
a spot we would like to use for more vegetable gardening. My husband
suggested cutting down the maple, which I would not allow, of course.
*However*, I am really not that attached to the maple, which was here
when we moved in six years ago. I would be willing to find it a new
home, especially if someone wanted to pay for it.

Is it feasible to move a tree that is well over ten years old? (canopy
spread is probably over 10 feet across, although I'm a not a great
judge of distances). Would a nursery possibly pay for the tree?


A tree that size sells for at least $500 at a nursery. I'm sure it can be
moved - by a pro - for maybe $300...but wait until December thru February.

A nursery might take it off your hands for free.


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Old 20-06-2006, 11:42 PM posted to triangle.gardens
Nosmo King
 
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Default Japanese Maple

In article . com, "Susan Hogarth" wrote:
I have a lovely japanese maple sitting close to our large magnolia and
a spot we would like to use for more vegetable gardening.


Cut down the magnolia and keep the japanese maple. The maple won't get that
big, especially compared to the magnolia. Magnolias are very messy plants
(with the dropping of their large leaves and cones) and will grow quite large,
both vertically and horizontally. After a few years, you won't have any space
left for a garden.
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Old 22-06-2006, 08:36 PM posted to triangle.gardens
Susan Hogarth
 
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Default Japanese Maple

Nosmo King wrote:
In article . com, "Susan Hogarth" wrote:
I have a lovely japanese maple sitting close to our large magnolia and
a spot we would like to use for more vegetable gardening.


Cut down the magnolia


Not going to happen! The magnolia is much bigger, older, and is a
showpiece. I like the maple, but I'm a transplant from Maryland and I
adore the magnolia and wouldn't dream of getting rid of it. It also
smells nice when it flowers which the maple never does, doesn't have
beetles eating it to shreds every summer like the maple, and stays
green all winter.

I guess we're just not japanese maple people. They are lovely trees,
but suited best for beautiful landscaping, which I am probably never
going to take up seriously (we've talked serously about growing
*wheat*!). I don't mind the maple - it has the distinct advantage of
being short and so not blocking the solar panels - but at this point I
don't particularly treasure it either. If someone would, that would be
a nice outcome.

- S.



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Old 24-06-2006, 12:37 AM posted to triangle.gardens
Anne Lurie
 
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Default Japanese Maple

wheat????

Seriously, whatever you do with the tree, I think summer is not the time to
do it.

Besides, you get to use the time to figure out what you want to plant in the
garden next spring and how you want to configure the garden, etc.

Okay, I confess to being a "well" person, and there are simply things I
don't bother trying in the summer here on the "sandy side"! Except of
course, I would never flippantly say "cut down" a tree.

Speaking of cutting down, a skanky maple near my water garden lost a 12-15'
branch in what seemed to be a minor T-storm, so that whole tree may go.
(Actually, I have been eying it for a while now, since the lawn seems to be
moving downhill, leaving the maple's roots more exposed, and they are
becoming a hazard!)

Anne

"Susan Hogarth" wrote in message
ups.com...
Nosmo King wrote:
In article . com, "Susan
Hogarth" wrote:
I have a lovely japanese maple sitting close to our large magnolia and
a spot we would like to use for more vegetable gardening.


Cut down the magnolia


Not going to happen! The magnolia is much bigger, older, and is a
showpiece. I like the maple, but I'm a transplant from Maryland and I
adore the magnolia and wouldn't dream of getting rid of it. It also
smells nice when it flowers which the maple never does, doesn't have
beetles eating it to shreds every summer like the maple, and stays
green all winter.

I guess we're just not japanese maple people. They are lovely trees,
but suited best for beautiful landscaping, which I am probably never
going to take up seriously (we've talked serously about growing
*wheat*!). I don't mind the maple - it has the distinct advantage of
being short and so not blocking the solar panels - but at this point I
don't particularly treasure it either. If someone would, that would be
a nice outcome.

- S.



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Old 28-06-2006, 10:56 PM posted to triangle.gardens
Susan Hogarth
 
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Default Japanese Maple

Anne Lurie wrote:
wheat????


Sure. It's what's for dinner!

;-)

Seriously, whatever you do with the tree, I think summer is not the time to
do it.


I'm convinced of that, thanks. I know moving my own not-inconsiderable
bulk in this heat is stressful; I imagine it'd be tough on something
that doesn't -expect- to move!

Besides, you get to use the time to figure out what you want to plant in the
garden next spring and how you want to configure the garden, etc.


Planning. Now *there* is something I need to try!

- Susan



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