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  #1   Report Post  
Old 21-06-2004, 06:09 PM
Pat
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

Hi all,

I would like to select an efficient (submersible) pond pump for my pond
(capable of 1200 gph at 4ft head). Unfortunately, most pump specs only list
a single "power consumption" value without specifying what flow (or head)
that occurs at. What I really need is a power consumption vs. flow (or
head) curve so I can determine the power consumption at my particular
conditions. Is there any way to extrapolate this from typically pump specs?
Any other sources for this information? I'm currently considering Oase and
Cyprio models.

Thanks for any help. I appreciate it. -Pat





  #2   Report Post  
Old 21-06-2004, 07:12 PM
grubber
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

"Pat" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s51...
Hi all,

I would like to select an efficient (submersible) pond pump for my pond
(capable of 1200 gph at 4ft head). Unfortunately, most pump specs only

list
a single "power consumption" value without specifying what flow (or head)
that occurs at. What I really need is a power consumption vs. flow (or
head) curve so I can determine the power consumption at my particular
conditions. Is there any way to extrapolate this from typically pump

specs?
Any other sources for this information? I'm currently considering Oase

and
Cyprio models.

Thanks for any help. I appreciate it. -Pat





I know Sequence pumps have power v flow curves available, but those are
external pumps. For submersibles, the Laguna 5000 should give the flow you
need at around 85 watts, which is the most efficient submersible I found
when I looked.

If you can make an external pump work, they tend to be more efficient than
the submersibles.


  #3   Report Post  
Old 21-06-2004, 08:10 PM
Pat
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

"grubber" wrote in message
...
"Pat" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s51...
Hi all,

I would like to select an efficient (submersible) pond pump for my pond
(capable of 1200 gph at 4ft head). Unfortunately, most pump specs only

list
a single "power consumption" value without specifying what flow (or

head)
that occurs at. What I really need is a power consumption vs. flow (or
head) curve so I can determine the power consumption at my particular
conditions. Is there any way to extrapolate this from typically pump

specs?
Any other sources for this information? I'm currently considering Oase

and
Cyprio models.

Thanks for any help. I appreciate it. -Pat





I know Sequence pumps have power v flow curves available, but those are
external pumps. For submersibles, the Laguna 5000 should give the flow

you
need at around 85 watts, which is the most efficient submersible I found
when I looked.

If you can make an external pump work, they tend to be more efficient than
the submersibles.




Thanks for the reply.

I considered a Sequence but all their models are designed for larger
applications. The smallest I found (3200SEQ20) was rated for 2800gph. The
Laguna 5000 looks good, but would probably need a prefilter. Our last pump
required a prefilter, which constantly clogged and was a real pain. Also,
given how much lower it's advertised power consumption is than other
comparable mag drive products, I wonder how real it really is (either that,
or else the flowrate is not what they claim).

The appeal of either the Oase AquaMax/Powermax or Cyprio Titan is their
ability to pass solids, which (I think) should make them more maintenace
free. And they both look (on paper at least) to be pretty effiicient.

I'm surprised the manufacturers don't include more information on the power
use of their products since (in my opinion) this an important aspect to
consider when making a selection, given how much it can cost to operate
these things 24/7.

Thanks again, -Pat




  #4   Report Post  
Old 21-06-2004, 10:05 PM
D Kat
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

I hesitate to post this again after just being made fun of for my repeating
it continuously but it really does work for me. I had the same issue with
not being able to deal with the cleaning of the prefilter all of the time (I
was about to just fill in the pond because of the twice a week clean that
this system needed). Someone else posted in here about putting a pump in a
bucket filled with lava rock. This acts both as a bio filter and as a
prefilter to the pump. I only clean mine out about once a year and I have
been using this method for some time now. I had been using a waterfall pump
which is not picky about being prefiltered but when the cord was damaged I
fell back on my old pump that had needed prefiltering and it has been
working fine.


"Pat" wrote in message
news[email protected]_s53...
"grubber" wrote in message
...
"Pat" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s51...
Hi all,

I would like to select an efficient (submersible) pond pump for my

pond
(capable of 1200 gph at 4ft head). Unfortunately, most pump specs

only
list
a single "power consumption" value without specifying what flow (or

head)
that occurs at. What I really need is a power consumption vs. flow

(or
head) curve so I can determine the power consumption at my particular
conditions. Is there any way to extrapolate this from typically pump

specs?
Any other sources for this information? I'm currently considering

Oase
and
Cyprio models.

Thanks for any help. I appreciate it. -Pat





I know Sequence pumps have power v flow curves available, but those are
external pumps. For submersibles, the Laguna 5000 should give the flow

you
need at around 85 watts, which is the most efficient submersible I found
when I looked.

If you can make an external pump work, they tend to be more efficient

than
the submersibles.




Thanks for the reply.

I considered a Sequence but all their models are designed for larger
applications. The smallest I found (3200SEQ20) was rated for 2800gph.

The
Laguna 5000 looks good, but would probably need a prefilter. Our last

pump
required a prefilter, which constantly clogged and was a real pain. Also,
given how much lower it's advertised power consumption is than other
comparable mag drive products, I wonder how real it really is (either

that,
or else the flowrate is not what they claim).

The appeal of either the Oase AquaMax/Powermax or Cyprio Titan is their
ability to pass solids, which (I think) should make them more maintenace
free. And they both look (on paper at least) to be pretty effiicient.

I'm surprised the manufacturers don't include more information on the

power
use of their products since (in my opinion) this an important aspect to
consider when making a selection, given how much it can cost to operate
these things 24/7.

Thanks again, -Pat






  #5   Report Post  
Old 21-06-2004, 10:05 PM
D Kat
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

I hesitate to post this again after just being made fun of for my repeating
it continuously but it really does work for me. I had the same issue with
not being able to deal with the cleaning of the prefilter all of the time (I
was about to just fill in the pond because of the twice a week clean that
this system needed). Someone else posted in here about putting a pump in a
bucket filled with lava rock. This acts both as a bio filter and as a
prefilter to the pump. I only clean mine out about once a year and I have
been using this method for some time now. I had been using a waterfall pump
which is not picky about being prefiltered but when the cord was damaged I
fell back on my old pump that had needed prefiltering and it has been
working fine.


"Pat" wrote in message
news[email protected]_s53...
"grubber" wrote in message
...
"Pat" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s51...
Hi all,

I would like to select an efficient (submersible) pond pump for my

pond
(capable of 1200 gph at 4ft head). Unfortunately, most pump specs

only
list
a single "power consumption" value without specifying what flow (or

head)
that occurs at. What I really need is a power consumption vs. flow

(or
head) curve so I can determine the power consumption at my particular
conditions. Is there any way to extrapolate this from typically pump

specs?
Any other sources for this information? I'm currently considering

Oase
and
Cyprio models.

Thanks for any help. I appreciate it. -Pat





I know Sequence pumps have power v flow curves available, but those are
external pumps. For submersibles, the Laguna 5000 should give the flow

you
need at around 85 watts, which is the most efficient submersible I found
when I looked.

If you can make an external pump work, they tend to be more efficient

than
the submersibles.




Thanks for the reply.

I considered a Sequence but all their models are designed for larger
applications. The smallest I found (3200SEQ20) was rated for 2800gph.

The
Laguna 5000 looks good, but would probably need a prefilter. Our last

pump
required a prefilter, which constantly clogged and was a real pain. Also,
given how much lower it's advertised power consumption is than other
comparable mag drive products, I wonder how real it really is (either

that,
or else the flowrate is not what they claim).

The appeal of either the Oase AquaMax/Powermax or Cyprio Titan is their
ability to pass solids, which (I think) should make them more maintenace
free. And they both look (on paper at least) to be pretty effiicient.

I'm surprised the manufacturers don't include more information on the

power
use of their products since (in my opinion) this an important aspect to
consider when making a selection, given how much it can cost to operate
these things 24/7.

Thanks again, -Pat








  #6   Report Post  
Old 21-06-2004, 11:06 PM
grubber
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

"D Kat" wrote in message
...
I hesitate to post this again after just being made fun of for my

repeating
it continuously but it really does work for me. I had the same issue with
not being able to deal with the cleaning of the prefilter all of the time

(I
was about to just fill in the pond because of the twice a week clean that
this system needed). Someone else posted in here about putting a pump in

a
bucket filled with lava rock. This acts both as a bio filter and as a
prefilter to the pump. I only clean mine out about once a year and I have
been using this method for some time now. I had been using a waterfall

pump
which is not picky about being prefiltered but when the cord was damaged I
fell back on my old pump that had needed prefiltering and it has been
working fine.


"Pat" wrote in message
news[email protected]_s53...
"grubber" wrote in message
...
"Pat" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s51...
Hi all,

I would like to select an efficient (submersible) pond pump for my

pond
(capable of 1200 gph at 4ft head). Unfortunately, most pump specs

only
list
a single "power consumption" value without specifying what flow (or

head)
that occurs at. What I really need is a power consumption vs. flow

(or
head) curve so I can determine the power consumption at my

particular
conditions. Is there any way to extrapolate this from typically

pump
specs?
Any other sources for this information? I'm currently considering

Oase
and
Cyprio models.

Thanks for any help. I appreciate it. -Pat





I know Sequence pumps have power v flow curves available, but those

are
external pumps. For submersibles, the Laguna 5000 should give the

flow
you
need at around 85 watts, which is the most efficient submersible I

found
when I looked.

If you can make an external pump work, they tend to be more efficient

than
the submersibles.




Thanks for the reply.

I considered a Sequence but all their models are designed for larger
applications. The smallest I found (3200SEQ20) was rated for 2800gph.

The
Laguna 5000 looks good, but would probably need a prefilter. Our last

pump
required a prefilter, which constantly clogged and was a real pain.

Also,
given how much lower it's advertised power consumption is than other
comparable mag drive products, I wonder how real it really is (either

that,
or else the flowrate is not what they claim).

The appeal of either the Oase AquaMax/Powermax or Cyprio Titan is their
ability to pass solids, which (I think) should make them more maintenace
free. And they both look (on paper at least) to be pretty effiicient.

I'm surprised the manufacturers don't include more information on the

power
use of their products since (in my opinion) this an important aspect to
consider when making a selection, given how much it can cost to operate
these things 24/7.

Thanks again, -Pat







I have a Laguna 5000 in a large pot full of pea gravel and I haven't had to
unclog it in the several months it's been running. I don't have any idea on
the actual power consumption, but the output seems to be about what is
advertised.


  #7   Report Post  
Old 22-06-2004, 12:07 AM
Newbie Bill
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

Hi Pat - I have a Laguna 5000. As I am at least a teeeny bit past my
totally a... retentive stage I can quote only my recollection. Mine travels
about 15 feet, through flex tube to an above ground level of about 3 feet
and my actual flow is around 1100. Not having the experience I dont know,
but there is a very discernable 'leak' through the diverter so if I really
tried to 'fix' it I you may well your 1200 gph. I dont need the gph. It
does have a coarse prefilter which does clog very regular. I now have mine
sitting in a milk crate lined with coarse boars hair filter material, have
removed the pre filter material, but left the filter cage in place, just in
case. For 45 days now (and the algae starts early here) I have not noticed
any discernable loss in gph. www.azponds.com used to have these for a song,
but havent checked lately. If you absolutely positively need that 1200 gph
I suspect this is not for you. I think it is only rate at 1650 or so at 0
or 1'.
This might help.
Bill Brister - Austin, Texas
"Pat" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s51...
Hi all,

I would like to select an efficient (submersible) pond pump for my pond
(capable of 1200 gph at 4ft head). Unfortunately, most pump specs only

list
a single "power consumption" value without specifying what flow (or head)
that occurs at. What I really need is a power consumption vs. flow (or
head) curve so I can determine the power consumption at my particular
conditions. Is there any way to extrapolate this from typically pump

specs?
Any other sources for this information? I'm currently considering Oase

and
Cyprio models.

Thanks for any help. I appreciate it. -Pat






  #8   Report Post  
Old 22-06-2004, 12:07 AM
Newbie Bill
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

I indeed have read numerous references to filling a 5 gal bucket or milk
crate with pea gravel or lava rock. I tried the milk crate with pea gravel
for a while and found even that very difficult pull out of the pond. In
that I am pretty sure most of you lift 12 oz much more often than what 50-70
lbs dead weight, how do you manage this?
Weakling in Austin
Bill Brister


"D Kat" wrote in message
...
I hesitate to post this again after just being made fun of for my

repeating
it continuously but it really does work for me. I had the same issue with
not being able to deal with the cleaning of the prefilter all of the time

(I
was about to just fill in the pond because of the twice a week clean that
this system needed). Someone else posted in here about putting a pump in

a
bucket filled with lava rock. This acts both as a bio filter and as a
prefilter to the pump. I only clean mine out about once a year and I have
been using this method for some time now. I had been using a waterfall

pump
which is not picky about being prefiltered but when the cord was damaged I
fell back on my old pump that had needed prefiltering and it has been
working fine.


"Pat" wrote in message
news[email protected]_s53...
"grubber" wrote in message
...
"Pat" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s51...
Hi all,

I would like to select an efficient (submersible) pond pump for my

pond
(capable of 1200 gph at 4ft head). Unfortunately, most pump specs

only
list
a single "power consumption" value without specifying what flow (or

head)
that occurs at. What I really need is a power consumption vs. flow

(or
head) curve so I can determine the power consumption at my

particular
conditions. Is there any way to extrapolate this from typically

pump
specs?
Any other sources for this information? I'm currently considering

Oase
and
Cyprio models.

Thanks for any help. I appreciate it. -Pat





I know Sequence pumps have power v flow curves available, but those

are
external pumps. For submersibles, the Laguna 5000 should give the

flow
you
need at around 85 watts, which is the most efficient submersible I

found
when I looked.

If you can make an external pump work, they tend to be more efficient

than
the submersibles.




Thanks for the reply.

I considered a Sequence but all their models are designed for larger
applications. The smallest I found (3200SEQ20) was rated for 2800gph.

The
Laguna 5000 looks good, but would probably need a prefilter. Our last

pump
required a prefilter, which constantly clogged and was a real pain.

Also,
given how much lower it's advertised power consumption is than other
comparable mag drive products, I wonder how real it really is (either

that,
or else the flowrate is not what they claim).

The appeal of either the Oase AquaMax/Powermax or Cyprio Titan is their
ability to pass solids, which (I think) should make them more maintenace
free. And they both look (on paper at least) to be pretty effiicient.

I'm surprised the manufacturers don't include more information on the

power
use of their products since (in my opinion) this an important aspect to
consider when making a selection, given how much it can cost to operate
these things 24/7.

Thanks again, -Pat








  #9   Report Post  
Old 22-06-2004, 12:08 AM
Barbara2245
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

"Pat" wrote in message news:[email protected]_s53...
"grubber" wrote in message
...
"Pat" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s51...
Hi all,

I would like to select an efficient (submersible) pond pump for my pond
(capable of 1200 gph at 4ft head). Unfortunately, most pump specs only

list
a single "power consumption" value without specifying what flow (or

head)
that occurs at. What I really need is a power consumption vs. flow (or
head) curve so I can determine the power consumption at my particular
conditions. Is there any way to extrapolate this from typically pump

specs?
Any other sources for this information? I'm currently considering Oase

and
Cyprio models.


The Laguna Power Jet 5000 I bought a few years ago cost about $5/month
to run. I replaced the pre-filter with an plastic net onion bag. Any
pump will clog fast if you don't clam-shell it in two small baskets
lined with a blue Walmart trimable furnace filter amd enclosed in a
bag made from fiberglass window screen. Set this on a cement block in
the pond and use a hoe[I have a hoe handle with the hook end still on
it] or something to fish it out when cleaning is needed. This pump
runs my 4" waterfall and a fountain. To figure the cost to run a
pump---watts[amps x volts] divided by 1000x KWH cost x 24 hours x 30
days= cost. Good luck.

Thanks for any help. I appreciate it. -Pat





I know Sequence pumps have power v flow curves available, but those are
external pumps. For submersibles, the Laguna 5000 should give the flow

you
need at around 85 watts, which is the most efficient submersible I found
when I looked.

If you can make an external pump work, they tend to be more efficient than
the submersibles.




Thanks for the reply.

I considered a Sequence but all their models are designed for larger
applications. The smallest I found (3200SEQ20) was rated for 2800gph. The
Laguna 5000 looks good, but would probably need a prefilter. Our last pump
required a prefilter, which constantly clogged and was a real pain. Also,
given how much lower it's advertised power consumption is than other
comparable mag drive products, I wonder how real it really is (either that,
or else the flowrate is not what they claim).

The appeal of either the Oase AquaMax/Powermax or Cyprio Titan is their
ability to pass solids, which (I think) should make them more maintenace
free. And they both look (on paper at least) to be pretty effiicient.

I'm surprised the manufacturers don't include more information on the power
use of their products since (in my opinion) this an important aspect to
consider when making a selection, given how much it can cost to operate
these things 24/7.

Thanks again, -Pat

  #10   Report Post  
Old 22-06-2004, 01:04 AM
bluegill phil
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

My strainer is a 4in frenchdrain grill glued into a 4in elbow which is
reduced to my pump inlet. The frenchdrain part which points down is in
a cheap small clothshamper with filter media packed around and under
the frenchdrain and the whole thing is wraped with the media. The
media I use is in the fabric section at walmart. Its something like
nylon black fine perforated kids costume material. It was very cheap
is a little to fine for my volume 6600gh but I still only have to
clean everyother week.My pump is below water level connected by
bulkhead to a foot or 2 straight pipe all joints glued but I didnt
glue the elbow to the straight pipe. I remove it to clean.




  #11   Report Post  
Old 22-06-2004, 03:03 PM
RainLover
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

On Mon, 21 Jun 2004 18:38:27 GMT, "Pat"
wrote:

I know Sequence pumps have power v flow curves available, but those are
external pumps. For submersibles, the Laguna 5000 should give the flow

you
need at around 85 watts, which is the most efficient submersible I found
when I looked.

If you can make an external pump work, they tend to be more efficient than
the submersibles.




Thanks for the reply.

I considered a Sequence but all their models are designed for larger
applications. The smallest I found (3200SEQ20) was rated for 2800gph. The
Laguna 5000 looks good, but would probably need a prefilter. Our last pump
required a prefilter, which constantly clogged and was a real pain.


My only comment here is why would you consider a prefilter a 'pain' since
without the prefilter the PUMP would get gummed up internally and either run
very inefficiently (ie: use much more power) or just DIE from to much strain
on it.


If it clogs to quickly, put a larger prefilter on it or find a way to get to
the prefilter that isn't as much a pain to access.

james, seattle

  #12   Report Post  
Old 22-06-2004, 05:05 PM
Pat
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

Thanks for the info on the filter. Our old system had two large filter
baskets with pretty dense material. In retrospect, I should have replaced
this stuff with something much less dense. I think the pump could have
handled it.

$5/mo seems about right for 85W consumption, depending on what you pay for
electricity. How did you determine this (if you don't mind me asking) -
based on changes in your electric bill?

-Pat



"Barbara2245" wrote in message
om...
"Pat" wrote in message

news:[email protected]_s53...
"grubber" wrote in message
...
"Pat" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s51...
Hi all,

I would like to select an efficient (submersible) pond pump for my

pond
(capable of 1200 gph at 4ft head). Unfortunately, most pump specs

only
list
a single "power consumption" value without specifying what flow (or

head)
that occurs at. What I really need is a power consumption vs. flow

(or
head) curve so I can determine the power consumption at my

particular
conditions. Is there any way to extrapolate this from typically

pump
specs?
Any other sources for this information? I'm currently considering

Oase
and
Cyprio models.


The Laguna Power Jet 5000 I bought a few years ago cost about $5/month
to run. I replaced the pre-filter with an plastic net onion bag. Any
pump will clog fast if you don't clam-shell it in two small baskets
lined with a blue Walmart trimable furnace filter amd enclosed in a
bag made from fiberglass window screen. Set this on a cement block in
the pond and use a hoe[I have a hoe handle with the hook end still on
it] or something to fish it out when cleaning is needed. This pump
runs my 4" waterfall and a fountain. To figure the cost to run a
pump---watts[amps x volts] divided by 1000x KWH cost x 24 hours x 30
days= cost. Good luck.

Thanks for any help. I appreciate it. -Pat





I know Sequence pumps have power v flow curves available, but those

are
external pumps. For submersibles, the Laguna 5000 should give the

flow
you
need at around 85 watts, which is the most efficient submersible I

found
when I looked.

If you can make an external pump work, they tend to be more efficient

than
the submersibles.




Thanks for the reply.

I considered a Sequence but all their models are designed for larger
applications. The smallest I found (3200SEQ20) was rated for 2800gph.

The
Laguna 5000 looks good, but would probably need a prefilter. Our last

pump
required a prefilter, which constantly clogged and was a real pain.

Also,
given how much lower it's advertised power consumption is than other
comparable mag drive products, I wonder how real it really is (either

that,
or else the flowrate is not what they claim).

The appeal of either the Oase AquaMax/Powermax or Cyprio Titan is their
ability to pass solids, which (I think) should make them more maintenace
free. And they both look (on paper at least) to be pretty effiicient.

I'm surprised the manufacturers don't include more information on the

power
use of their products since (in my opinion) this an important aspect to
consider when making a selection, given how much it can cost to operate
these things 24/7.

Thanks again, -Pat



  #13   Report Post  
Old 22-06-2004, 06:07 PM
Pat
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

My only comment here is why would you consider a prefilter a 'pain' since
without the prefilter the PUMP would get gummed up internally and either

run
very inefficiently (ie: use much more power) or just DIE from to much

strain
on it.

Our system had two fairly large filter baskets with (what seemed to me)
pretty density filter material. It worked fine at first, but soon started
cloggling. It was a bit of a chore to pull out and clean, and after that
would only work for a couple of weeks before needing it again. That got old
really quick!

When we purchased those we were told that once things were in "balance,"
organisms in the filtered material would break it down and keep the water
flowing (without much maintenance on our part) but for some reason we never
were able to reach that magical balance point. Being new to this, I'm sure
we were doing a lot of things wrong.

Based on the responses here, it sounds like we could have just replaced the
filter material with something less dense. Unfortanatly, the pump died also
(Danner mag drive). So since we having to replace this, we were thinking of
trying one like the Oase Aquamax or Cyprio Titan which can pump fairly
largle particulates (6 to 8 mm) and don't really require any filtering other
than their screened housings. Presumably this means less maintenance - at
least that's what we've heard. I was hoping someone who's used one or the
other could confirm this.

Thanks for the reply. -Pat


If it clogs to quickly, put a larger prefilter on it or find a way to get

to
the prefilter that isn't as much a pain to access.

james, seattle



  #14   Report Post  
Old 22-06-2004, 06:09 PM
Pat
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

Thanks Bill and Phill for the feedback.

1200gph is a conservative guess, so I think the Laguna would work. I'm just
a little wary of the filtering needs. We would really like something
reasonably low maintenance since, with three kids to chase after, we keep
pretty busy! :^)

Our original thought was that a "solids pump" like the Aquamax or Titan
would best fit the "low maintenance" bill, but based on responses here its
sounds like a conventional pump with the right home-made filter could be
reasonably easy as well. If our original pump were still working, we would
definitely go this route, but since we're having to replace the pump, its a
little harder to decide. Even with a solids pumps, we'll still likely have
a filter "sock" or such at the outlet. But that should be easy to empty
every so often, assuming that's all we really need to keep the pond clean.

Thanks again for help. -Pat


bluegill phil wrote in message
news
My strainer is a 4in frenchdrain grill glued into a 4in elbow which is
reduced to my pump inlet. The frenchdrain part which points down is in
a cheap small clothshamper with filter media packed around and under
the frenchdrain and the whole thing is wraped with the media. The
media I use is in the fabric section at walmart. Its something like
nylon black fine perforated kids costume material. It was very cheap
is a little to fine for my volume 6600gh but I still only have to
clean everyother week.My pump is below water level connected by
bulkhead to a foot or 2 straight pipe all joints glued but I didnt
glue the elbow to the straight pipe. I remove it to clean.




  #15   Report Post  
Old 22-06-2004, 11:11 PM
bluegill phil
 
Posts: n/a
Default Selecting an efficent pond pump

mine came with a leafbasket which has holes of about 4to6mm but im
afraid ill whip up the solids with just that
On Tue, 22 Jun 2004 16:33:35 GMT, "Pat"
wrote:

Thanks Bill and Phill for the feedback.

1200gph is a conservative guess, so I think the Laguna would work. I'm just
a little wary of the filtering needs. We would really like something
reasonably low maintenance since, with three kids to chase after, we keep
pretty busy! :^)

Our original thought was that a "solids pump" like the Aquamax or Titan
would best fit the "low maintenance" bill, but based on responses here its
sounds like a conventional pump with the right home-made filter could be
reasonably easy as well. If our original pump were still working, we would
definitely go this route, but since we're having to replace the pump, its a
little harder to decide. Even with a solids pumps, we'll still likely have
a filter "sock" or such at the outlet. But that should be easy to empty
every so often, assuming that's all we really need to keep the pond clean.

Thanks again for help. -Pat


bluegill phil wrote in message
news
My strainer is a 4in frenchdrain grill glued into a 4in elbow which is
reduced to my pump inlet. The frenchdrain part which points down is in
a cheap small clothshamper with filter media packed around and under
the frenchdrain and the whole thing is wraped with the media. The
media I use is in the fabric section at walmart. Its something like
nylon black fine perforated kids costume material. It was very cheap
is a little to fine for my volume 6600gh but I still only have to
clean everyother week.My pump is below water level connected by
bulkhead to a foot or 2 straight pipe all joints glued but I didnt
glue the elbow to the straight pipe. I remove it to clean.






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