Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2006, 09:31 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
slugbug
 
Posts: n/a
Default USDA zone map for UK - for comparison of climate, where to find?

Anyone know where I might be able to find (online, hopefully) something
like a USDA zone map of the UK? I'd like to have a comparison of
climates, in case I do some seed trading and such, so that I can be
knowledgeable about what might do well in various locales. Everything
I have is based on USDA zone maps, showing hardiness from zone 1 (very
cold) to zone 11. (subtropical) Here in Southwest Ohio, we are right
on the verge of being 5b or 6a, which means that in a typical winter,
we get down to 10 below zero Fahrenheit. Some years we only get down
to zero, but every 5 to 10 years, we might get down to 15 below.


  #2   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2006, 09:43 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Phil L
 
Posts: n/a
Default USDA zone map for UK - for comparison of climate, where to find?

slugbug wrote:
Anyone know where I might be able to find (online, hopefully)
something like a USDA zone map of the UK? I'd like to have a
comparison of climates, in case I do some seed trading and such, so
that I can be knowledgeable about what might do well in various
locales. Everything I have is based on USDA zone maps, showing
hardiness from zone 1 (very cold) to zone 11. (subtropical) Here in
Southwest Ohio, we are right on the verge of being 5b or 6a, which
means that in a typical winter, we get down to 10 below zero
Fahrenheit. Some years we only get down to zero, but every 5 to 10
years, we might get down to 15 below.


The UK isn't like America, we only have one climate, we are about the size
of California, although Scotland in the North is usually cooler than Devon
and Cornwall in the South, there is usually only a few degrees seperating
them (Celcius).


  #3   Report Post  
Old 06-01-2006, 12:16 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
**bg**
 
Posts: n/a
Default URls fer yoo - USDA zone map for UK - for comparison of climate, where to find?


"slugbug" wrote in message
oups.com...
Anyone know where I might be able to find (online, hopefully) something
like a USDA zone map of the UK? I'd like to have a comparison of
climates, in case I do some seed trading and such, so that I can be
knowledgeable about what might do well in various locales. Everything
I have is based on USDA zone maps, showing hardiness from zone 1 (very
cold) to zone 11. (subtropical) Here in Southwest Ohio, we are right
on the verge of being 5b or 6a, which means that in a typical winter,
we get down to 10 below zero Fahrenheit. Some years we only get down
to zero, but every 5 to 10 years, we might get down to 15 below.

____________________________

Hi,

Here on the west coast of Canadar (similar to Washington State and Oregon -
tho temps drop a bit going north) we have climate pretty well identical to
UK, it's called West Coast Marine.

See
http://www.uwsp.edu/geo/faculty/ritt...est_coast.html

and

http://www.uwsp.edu/geo/faculty/ritt...est_coast.html

Hey, try grapes, old crops make fine raisins, good organic crop to grow as
many commercial and wine grapes are sprayed with sulphites, yuk eh..

Mulch well in winter, or grow them in containers and bring them inside in
winter.

Cheers eh,

RjC
www.lchb.ca


  #4   Report Post  
Old 06-01-2006, 06:21 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
JennyC
 
Posts: n/a
Default USDA zone map for UK - for comparison of climate, where to find?


"Dave Poole" wrote in message
...
On 5 Jan 2006 13:31:56 -0800, "slugbug" wrote:

Anyone know where I might be able to find (online, hopefully) something
like a USDA zone map of the UK?


Not that it will give any real indication of a plant's ability to grow
well, but here is a link to the estimated zoning for the UK. It
ranges from 7 in the north through to 9B in the south west. Zoning
doesn't work for maritime climates like ours since plant hardiness is
determined by many other factors including duration of cold, summer
heat, light levels and rainfall. Ultimate cold hardiness is just one
part of the equation and a zone 7 plant in the US cannot be relied
upon to thrive in a zone 7 part of the UK.

http://www.naturenode.com/seeds/zoneeurope.html
Dave Poole


The whole world :~)
http://www.aroid.org/horticulture/zonemap/
Jenny


  #5   Report Post  
Old 06-01-2006, 02:44 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
p.k.
 
Posts: n/a
Default URls fer yoo - USDA zone map for UK - for comparison of climate, where to find?

Dave Poole wrote:
Janet Baraclough wrote:

Incidentally, grapes would not be a worthwhile commercial crop on
half an acre in Cornwall, and the commercial viability of drying
grapes into raisins anywhere in the UK is remote.


Well, they are worth growing for wines ... but mainly in the much
drier east - especially Sussex and Kent where some very fine vintages
that rival the French are now produced. Devon has a few as do most
counties along the south coast where sunshine levels are highest, but
the quality isn't quite as good. Half an acre is nowhere near enough
in any case and there's a bit too much rainfall in Cornwall for the
production of really good wine grapes.


Camel Vally get soem good write ups esp the fizz

http://www.english-wine.com/camelfeature.html

pk




  #6   Report Post  
Old 06-01-2006, 02:53 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Sacha
 
Posts: n/a
Default URls fer yoo - USDA zone map for UK - for comparison ofclimate, where to find?

On 6/1/06 13:49, in article ,
"Dave Poole" wrote:

Janet Baraclough wrote:

Incidentally, grapes would not be a worthwhile commercial crop on
half an acre in Cornwall, and the commercial viability of drying grapes
into raisins anywhere in the UK is remote.


Well, they are worth growing for wines ... but mainly in the much
drier east - especially Sussex and Kent where some very fine vintages
that rival the French are now produced. Devon has a few as do most
counties along the south coast where sunshine levels are highest, but
the quality isn't quite as good. Half an acre is nowhere near enough
in any case and there's a bit too much rainfall in Cornwall for the
production of really good wine grapes. As for raisins? Regardless of
the grapes not developing enough sugars, our costs and overheads
compared with Italy, Greece, Turkey, Israel etc. make this totally
impractical.

When Edward Hyams bought this place in the 50s, it was with the idea of
growing grapes, which he had done in Kent. If anyone knew what he was about
it, was Hyams but that venture failed. OTOH, Sharpham is doing well with
its wine on the banks of the River Dart, not far from here but on a very
great deal more than half an acre.

--
Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.co.uk
South Devon
(remove the weeds to email me)

  #7   Report Post  
Old 06-01-2006, 05:16 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
p.k.
 
Posts: n/a
Default URls fer yoo - USDA zone map for UK - for comparison of climate, where to find?

Janet Baraclough wrote:
~Camel Valley get some good write ups esp the fizz
~
~http://www.english-wine.com/camelfeature.html
~
Glad you said that - I was just about to wade in and say ahem!


Sigh. Could I draw the learned friends' attention to the vital
qualifying phrase " worthwhile commercial crop on half an acre" (for
further enlightenment see thread "any ideas please").

:~}

Janet


You are quite right, but i was more commenting on the wine than the project
at hand - damn thread-drift!

pk


  #8   Report Post  
Old 07-01-2006, 12:06 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
slugbug
 
Posts: n/a
Default USDA zone map for UK - for comparison of climate, where to find?

The UK uses Celcius not Fahrenheit.

I understand that. Unfortunately, you Britons foisted Miles and
Fahrenheit on us back when we were getting started, and we've been
stuck with them ever since. Now if we ever switched over, it would be
a catastrophe! Just think:

1) We would have to throw out all of our mercury thermometers, creating
an environmental armageddon

2) All of the roads in Ohio and the majority of states are marked off
in 1 mile squares. This means you come to an intersection of another
road each mile down the road, which lets you figure how far you have
driven with no problems. Think of all the math we'd have to use if we
switched to kilometers! (what is that, something like 1.4 km x however
many roads we've passed...)

  #9   Report Post  
Old 07-01-2006, 09:13 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Charlie Pridham
 
Posts: n/a
Default URls fer yoo - USDA zone map for UK - for comparison ofclimate, where to find?


"Sacha" wrote in message
news:BFE434DD.2768F%
When Edward Hyams bought this place in the 50s, it was with the idea of
growing grapes, which he had done in Kent. If anyone knew what he was

about
it, was Hyams but that venture failed. OTOH, Sharpham is doing well with
its wine on the banks of the River Dart, not far from here but on a very
great deal more than half an acre.

--
Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.co.uk
South Devon
(remove the weeds to email me)

To be fair the OP did say suppliment an income not replace it completely,
back in the other thread I suggested Tea but its worth pointing out that
Tregothnan make a great deal from the foliage prunings to the cut flower
industry from their ordinary camellia plantations so a further suggestion
would be foliage production as its not so hit and miss as flower or fruit.
All this has absolutly nothing to do with zone maps!

--
Charlie, gardening in Cornwall.
http://www.roselandhouse.co.uk
Holders of National Plant Collection of Clematis viticella (cvs)



  #10   Report Post  
Old 07-01-2006, 11:37 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Bob Hobden
 
Posts: n/a
Default URls fer yoo - USDA zone map for UK - for comparison of climate, where to find?


"Dave Poole" wrote after
Janet Baraclough wrote:

Incidentally, grapes would not be a worthwhile commercial crop on
half an acre in Cornwall, and the commercial viability of drying grapes
into raisins anywhere in the UK is remote.


Well, they are worth growing for wines ... but mainly in the much
drier east - especially Sussex and Kent where some very fine vintages
that rival the French are now produced. Devon has a few as do most
counties along the south coast where sunshine levels are highest, but
the quality isn't quite as good. Half an acre is nowhere near enough
in any case and there's a bit too much rainfall in Cornwall for the
production of really good wine grapes. As for raisins? Regardless of
the grapes not developing enough sugars, our costs and overheads
compared with Italy, Greece, Turkey, Israel etc. make this totally
impractical.

Let's not forget Essex...
http://www.newhallwines.co.uk/
I can confirm the quality of their wines. :-)

--
Regards
Bob
In Runnymede, 17 miles West of London




  #11   Report Post  
Old 07-01-2006, 06:17 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Rupert
 
Posts: n/a
Default USDA zone map for UK - for comparison of climate, where to find?


"slugbug" wrote in message
oups.com...
The UK uses Celcius not Fahrenheit.


I understand that. Unfortunately, you Britons foisted Miles and
Fahrenheit on us back when we were getting started, and we've been
stuck with them ever since. Now if we ever switched over, it would be
a catastrophe! Just think:

1) We would have to throw out all of our mercury thermometers, creating
an environmental armageddon

2) All of the roads in Ohio and the majority of states are marked off
in 1 mile squares. This means you come to an intersection of another
road each mile down the road, which lets you figure how far you have
driven with no problems. Think of all the math we'd have to use if we
switched to kilometers! (what is that, something like 1.4 km x however
many roads we've passed...)

I do not wish to upset you but the American Gallon degrees F and Miles are
all slightly larger than the UK -


  #12   Report Post  
Old 07-01-2006, 07:20 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Rupert
 
Posts: n/a
Default USDA zone map for UK - for comparison of climate, where to find?


"slugbug" wrote in message
oups.com...
The UK uses Celcius not Fahrenheit.


I understand that. Unfortunately, you Britons foisted Miles and
Fahrenheit on us back when we were getting started, and we've been
stuck with them ever since. Now if we ever switched over, it would be
a catastrophe! Just think:

1) We would have to throw out all of our mercury thermometers, creating
an environmental armageddon

2) All of the roads in Ohio and the majority of states are marked off
in 1 mile squares. This means you come to an intersection of another
road each mile down the road, which lets you figure how far you have
driven with no problems. Think of all the math we'd have to use if we
switched to kilometers! (what is that, something like 1.4 km x however
many roads we've passed...)


Don't worry about the math thing . All you need to do is rename a mile as
the American Kilometre.
The UK still uses Miles but that's no excuse for your lot to foist dots per
inch on us:-)


  #13   Report Post  
Old 07-01-2006, 10:29 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Mike Lyle
 
Posts: n/a
Default USDA zone map for UK - for comparison of climate, where to find?

Rupert wrote:
"slugbug" wrote in message
oups.com...
The UK uses Celcius not Fahrenheit.


I understand that. Unfortunately, you Britons foisted Miles and
Fahrenheit on us back when we were getting started, and we've been
stuck with them ever since.

[...]
I do not wish to upset you but the American Gallon degrees F and
Miles are all slightly larger than the UK -


Not quite. The US gall is smaller than the Imp. The gals, now, that's
a different story...

I'm a bit surprised about the degree F, though: thought that was
internationally agreed, though not, of course, SI.

--
Mike.


  #14   Report Post  
Old 07-01-2006, 11:38 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
Janet Baraclough
 
Posts: n/a
Default USDA zone map for UK - for comparison of climate, where to find?

The message
from "Rupert" contains these words:


"slugbug" wrote in message
oups.com...
The UK uses Celcius not Fahrenheit.


I understand that. Unfortunately, you Britons foisted Miles and
Fahrenheit on us back when we were getting started, and we've been
stuck with them ever since. Now if we ever switched over, it would be
a catastrophe! Just think:

1) We would have to throw out all of our mercury thermometers, creating
an environmental armageddon

2) All of the roads in Ohio and the majority of states are marked off
in 1 mile squares. This means you come to an intersection of another
road each mile down the road, which lets you figure how far you have
driven with no problems. Think of all the math we'd have to use if we
switched to kilometers! (what is that, something like 1.4 km x however
many roads we've passed...)


Don't worry about the math thing . All you need to do is rename a mile as
the American Kilometre.


It'll be a bit puny, just like American gallons, pints, tons and
cwt..but you probably won't notice...

Janet
  #15   Report Post  
Old 08-01-2006, 07:13 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
JennyC
 
Posts: n/a
Default USDA zone map for UK - for comparison of climate, where to find?


"Dave Poole" wrote in message
...
On Sat, 7 Jan 2006 18:17:49 -0000, "Rupert"
wrote:

I do not wish to upset you but the American Gallon degrees F and Miles are
all slightly larger than the UK -


Yeah well they've always been a bit sizeist

Also, you can't get away with claiming that we foisted these
measurements on you. At the time fahrenheit was the accepted scale.
Times changed and so did we. Your lot made the choice to stick with
it - no fault of ours.
Dave Poole


Indeed!
The thermometer in Death Valley was reading 93 in the shade at 10am one morning
while we were there.

Apart from knowing it was hot, I could not remember the F scale at all!
When did Britain change over to C?

jenny




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
updated USDA zone map Nina Bonsai 0 11-01-2006 07:12 PM
[IBC] Climate zones in general (was: New USDA map) Jim Lewis Bonsai 0 17-01-2004 09:42 PM
Climate Zone Map cam Bonsai 0 12-01-2004 01:02 AM
Climate Zone Map jon Edible Gardening 2 24-08-2003 02:02 AM
Preview of 2003 USDA Plant Hardiness Zone Map Susan H. Simko Roses 4 09-07-2003 10:09 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:07 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2021 GardenBanter.co.uk.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Gardening"

 

Copyright © 2017