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Old 23-05-2015, 11:45 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Can anyone advise me on lawn edgings? I want to have a neat edge to my lawn
and am thinking about using the corrugated or straight rolls of thin coloured
plastic. There are several makes. Is it as easy as digging a slit about 4
inches deep along the line of the edge and just inserting the required length
and then back-filling with soil? I expect the cheaper ones to fade after a
few years but I’m not overly bothered by that. I’ve seen the metal ones
but they are quite expensive, though may be more rigid and easier to bang in
with a mallet. One disadvantage I can see is that the lawn close to the
edging will have to be cut with shears, or carefully with a strimmer, so as
not to chew up the edging.

At one end of the plastic market Poundstretcher do £2 for 8 metres, and at
the other B&Q is doing £15 for 1.5 metres.

--
tom raider


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Old 24-05-2015, 09:23 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 23/05/15 23:45, Tom Raider wrote:
Can anyone advise me on lawn edgings? I want to have a neat edge to my lawn
and am thinking about using the corrugated or straight rolls of thin coloured
plastic. There are several makes. Is it as easy as digging a slit about 4
inches deep along the line of the edge and just inserting the required length
and then back-filling with soil? I expect the cheaper ones to fade after a
few years but I’m not overly bothered by that. I’ve seen the metal ones
but they are quite expensive, though may be more rigid and easier to bang in
with a mallet. One disadvantage I can see is that the lawn close to the
edging will have to be cut with shears, or carefully with a strimmer, so as
not to chew up the edging.

At one end of the plastic market Poundstretcher do £2 for 8 metres, and at
the other B&Q is doing £15 for 1.5 metres.


I was in the same position as you a couple of years ago. It seems the
choice is between cheap and temporary, or expensive and permanent. I
used the corrugated green plastic bought in an end-of-season B&Q sale.

It is easy to put in using a lawn edger or spade to cut a slit. The
mower will eventually cut bits of it. It is a bit more resistant to the
strimmer, but that will get it in the end, too. The other thing is that
the damn crows seem to enjoy trying to pull it up!

I think that using harder material is fine for the lawn, but might do
some damage to the mower blades. You might also find that you use a lot
more strimmer line than you did before, as when that hits the hard
edging it gives rather than the edging.

--

Jeff
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Old 24-05-2015, 09:47 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 24/05/2015 09:23, Jeff Layman wrote:
On 23/05/15 23:45, Tom Raider wrote:
Can anyone advise me on lawn edgings? I want to have a neat edge to my
lawn
and am thinking about using the corrugated or straight rolls of thin
coloured
plastic. There are several makes. Is it as easy as digging a slit about 4
inches deep along the line of the edge and just inserting the required
length
and then back-filling with soil? I expect the cheaper ones to fade
after a
few years but I’m not overly bothered by that. I’ve seen the metal ones
but they are quite expensive, though may be more rigid and easier to
bang in
with a mallet. One disadvantage I can see is that the lawn close to the
edging will have to be cut with shears, or carefully with a strimmer,
so as
not to chew up the edging.

At one end of the plastic market Poundstretcher do £2 for 8 metres,
and at
the other B&Q is doing £15 for 1.5 metres.


I was in the same position as you a couple of years ago. It seems the
choice is between cheap and temporary, or expensive and permanent. I
used the corrugated green plastic bought in an end-of-season B&Q sale.

It is easy to put in using a lawn edger or spade to cut a slit. The
mower will eventually cut bits of it. It is a bit more resistant to the
strimmer, but that will get it in the end, too. The other thing is that
the damn crows seem to enjoy trying to pull it up!

I think that using harder material is fine for the lawn, but might do
some damage to the mower blades. You might also find that you use a lot
more strimmer line than you did before, as when that hits the hard
edging it gives rather than the edging.

You must all have stone free soil. If I tried that in my garden the
stones would make it impossible..
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Old 24-05-2015, 11:40 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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In article , lid
says...

On 23/05/15 23:45, Tom Raider wrote:
Can anyone advise me on lawn edgings? I want to have a neat edge to my lawn
and am thinking about using the corrugated or straight rolls of thin coloured
plastic. There are several makes. Is it as easy as digging a slit about 4
inches deep along the line of the edge and just inserting the required length
and then back-filling with soil? I expect the cheaper ones to fade after a
few years but I?m not overly bothered by that. I?ve seen the metal ones
but they are quite expensive, though may be more rigid and easier to bang in
with a mallet. One disadvantage I can see is that the lawn close to the
edging will have to be cut with shears, or carefully with a strimmer, so as
not to chew up the edging.

At one end of the plastic market Poundstretcher do 2 for 8 metres, and at
the other B&Q is doing 15 for 1.5 metres.


I was in the same position as you a couple of years ago. It seems the
choice is between cheap and temporary, or expensive and permanent. I
used the corrugated green plastic bought in an end-of-season B&Q sale.

It is easy to put in using a lawn edger or spade to cut a slit. The
mower will eventually cut bits of it. It is a bit more resistant to the
strimmer, but that will get it in the end, too. The other thing is that
the damn crows seem to enjoy trying to pull it up!

I think that using harder material is fine for the lawn, but might do
some damage to the mower blades. You might also find that you use a lot
more strimmer line than you did before, as when that hits the hard
edging it gives rather than the edging.


I got sick of trimming lawn edges; in our garden they took longer
than the mowing.

John laid a narrow concrete mowing strip round the edges of all our
lawns and beds. He used a spade/edger to cut a moat between the lawn and
bed, the lawn side formed one edge and he made the other with some long
flexible plastic strips; filled the moat with concrete, smoothed the
top, and when it had set removed the plastic strip to do the next
section. Curves easily accommodated. This was a copy of ssme thing a
friend had done. It was a lot of work but is the most labour saving
thing we've ever done in the garden. The mower wheel runs on the
concrete, the blade doesn't touch it and cuts the grass edge perfectly,
the grass never grows into the bed and there's no more tiresome edging
to trim. Saves hours of work.

https://flic.kr/p/swX4pR

Janet.





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Old 24-05-2015, 01:33 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 24 May 2015, Chris Hogg wrote some amazing prose:

And looks very good, if I might say so, especially now it's weathered
in and got a bit mossy.


Yes, it’s very neat and ages well, like an old duchess. I don’t think I
could do that myself, and I don’t want to have to pay someone to do it.

I have used 2 metre long lengths of wooden feather-edge boarding used
for d-i-y fencing and bought from our local d-i-y shed. This sort of
stuff: http://tinyurl.com/nhphy4n. Difficult on tight bends (but you
just use shorter bits), and rots eventually, but much of mine has been
in place for getting on for 15 years and is only now needing
replacing. Copes well with a strimmer, and doesn't damage the strimmer
line.


That might be an alternative. Though still hard work to put in. I might try
that on a small area and see how I get on. Thanks.


--
tom



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Old 24-05-2015, 03:03 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On Sat, 23 May 2015 23:45:19 +0100, Tom Raider
wrote:

Can anyone advise me on lawn edgings? I want to have a neat edge to my lawn
and am thinking about using the corrugated or straight rolls of thin coloured
plastic. There are several makes. Is it as easy as digging a slit about 4
inches deep along the line of the edge and just inserting the required length
and then back-filling with soil? I expect the cheaper ones to fade after a
few years but Im not overly bothered by that. Ive seen the metal ones
but they are quite expensive, though may be more rigid and easier to bang in
with a mallet. One disadvantage I can see is that the lawn close to the
edging will have to be cut with shears, or carefully with a strimmer, so as
not to chew up the edging.

At one end of the plastic market Poundstretcher do 2 for 8 metres, and at
the other B&Q is doing 15 for 1.5 metres.


The lawn at my previous house was edged in a narrow strip of concrete.
It was about 6" wide and deep enough to fill a "v" channel made by a
spade. These days in my garden I have to get a gardener. He uses a
Wolf lawn edge trimmer. It looks OK and so there is no need for any
concrete or plastic edging.

Steve

--
Neural Network Software for Windows http://www.npsnn.com

EasyNN-plus More than just a neural network http://www.easynn.com


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Old 24-05-2015, 03:34 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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"Tom Raider" wrote

Can anyone advise me on lawn edgings? I want to have a neat edge to my lawn
and am thinking about using the corrugated or straight rolls of thin
coloured
plastic. There are several makes. Is it as easy as digging a slit about 4
inches deep along the line of the edge and just inserting the required
length
and then back-filling with soil? I expect the cheaper ones to fade after a
few years but I’m not overly bothered by that. I’ve seen the metal ones
but they are quite expensive, though may be more rigid and easier to bang
in
with a mallet. One disadvantage I can see is that the lawn close to the
edging will have to be cut with shears, or carefully with a strimmer, so as
not to chew up the edging.

At one end of the plastic market Poundstretcher do £2 for 8 metres, and at
the other B&Q is doing £15 for 1.5 metres.


Having seen it in a friends garden (and most NT gardens) I decided to take
the plunge and bought the metal Everedge Lawn Edge. Very pleased with the
result, lengths lock together and it even bends 90° for corners. Makes
cutting the edge perfectly straight very easy. I would buy it again.
--
Regards. Bob Hobden.
Posted to this Newsgroup from the W of London, UK

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Old 24-05-2015, 04:13 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 24 May 2015, Chris Hogg wrote some amazing prose:

I have used 2 metre long lengths of wooden feather-edge boarding used
for d-i-y fencing and bought from our local d-i-y shed. This sort of
stuff:http://tinyurl.com/nhphy4n. Difficult on tight bends (but you
just use shorter bits), and rots eventually, but much of mine has been
in place for getting on for 15 years and is only now needing
replacing. Copes well with a strimmer, and doesn't damage the strimmer
line.


I’ve realised that I have a fence panel in the garage that I don’t need.
I might just try and break it up and see what the boarding looks like in the
ground.

--
tom

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Old 24-05-2015, 04:13 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 24 May 2015, Bob Hobden wrote some amazing prose:

Having seen it in a friends garden (and most NT gardens) I decided to take
the plunge and bought the metal Everedge Lawn Edge. Very pleased with the
result, lengths lock together and it even bends 90° for corners. Makes
cutting the edge perfectly straight very easy. I would buy it again.


That looks quite good — neat and tidy, and literally flexible. Slightly
expensive. Roughly £35 for 5 metres.


--
tom

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Old 24-05-2015, 05:32 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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"Tom Raider" wrote ...

Bob Hobden wrote some amazing prose:

Having seen it in a friends garden (and most NT gardens) I decided to
take
the plunge and bought the metal Everedge Lawn Edge. Very pleased with the
result, lengths lock together and it even bends 90° for corners. Makes
cutting the edge perfectly straight very easy. I would buy it again.


That looks quite good — neat and tidy, and literally flexible. Slightly
expensive. Roughly £35 for 5 metres.


With this it's "you get what you pay for". Whilst I haven't had it more than
a year I would expect it to see me out.
--
Regards. Bob Hobden.
Posted to this Newsgroup from the W of London, UK



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Old 27-05-2015, 08:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Hobden View Post
"Tom Raider" wrote ...

Bob Hobden wrote some amazing prose:

Having seen it in a friends garden (and most NT gardens) I decided to
take
the plunge and bought the metal Everedge Lawn Edge. Very pleased with the
result, lengths lock together and it even bends 90° for corners. Makes
cutting the edge perfectly straight very easy. I would buy it again.


That looks quite good — neat and tidy, and literally flexible. Slightly
expensive. Roughly £35 for 5 metres.


With this it's "you get what you pay for". Whilst I haven't had it more than
a year I would expect it to see me out.
--
Regards. Bob Hobden.
Posted to this Newsgroup from the W of London, UK
I bought the relatively cheap plastic version with a so called stone effect. Be aware that it is only finished on one side. I covered the back with waterproof tape as it would be visible and the bare version didn't look good. Also the stake like part that goes into the ground is not strong. You have to dig a trench, it will not go in with a mallet except in the softest of soil. If you don't mind the extra effort it does look quite good.


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