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Old 18-07-2003, 04:42 AM
Kirra
 
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Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?

Hi,

It is getting towards pruning time here in Australia and I would like to use
lime sulphur spray on my roses after pruning. I have read/heard that it will
cause leaves to fall off or become deformed if sprayed after the roses have
started to leaf out. If this is the case, how do I spray my three roses in
my front bed with companion plants? I have violas, snap dragons and grape
hyacinths in this bed and I am concerned that their leaves will become
deformed or fall off. Or could they even die as they aren't very big yet?

How do you deal with this? Should I avoid dormant spraying these roses or
attempt to spray/pour right against the canes so that there is no drift onto
the companion plants?

Thanks,

Kirra
Brisbane, Australia
zone 10



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Old 18-07-2003, 04:13 PM
Daniel Hanna
 
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Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?

In Kirra wrote:
How do you deal with this? Should I avoid dormant spraying these roses
or attempt to spray/pour right against the canes so that there is no
drift onto the companion plants?


Kirra, in the days when I was a lad (lol) and had companion plants, I
used a nice soft sponge dipped in lime sulphur solution and wiped the
bare canes with it.

Plenty of plants wouldn't mind lime sulphur, but then again plenty would,
too.

One tip - if you do this trick, use waterproof gloves. Otherwise your
hands will smell to high heaven for a week.
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Old 18-07-2003, 04:14 PM
Daniel Hanna
 
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Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?

In Kirra wrote:
How do you deal with this? Should I avoid dormant spraying these roses
or attempt to spray/pour right against the canes so that there is no
drift onto the companion plants?


Kirra, in the days when I was a lad (lol) and had companion plants, I
used a nice soft sponge dipped in lime sulphur solution and wiped the
bare canes with it.

Plenty of plants wouldn't mind lime sulphur, but then again plenty would,
too.

One tip - if you do this trick, use waterproof gloves. Otherwise your
hands will smell to high heaven for a week.
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Old 19-07-2003, 04:02 AM
Cass
 
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Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?

Daniel Hanna wrote:

In Kirra wrote:
How do you deal with this? Should I avoid dormant spraying these roses
or attempt to spray/pour right against the canes so that there is no
drift onto the companion plants?


Kirra, in the days when I was a lad (lol) and had companion plants, I
used a nice soft sponge dipped in lime sulphur solution and wiped the
bare canes with it.

Plenty of plants wouldn't mind lime sulphur, but then again plenty would,
too.

One tip - if you do this trick, use waterproof gloves. Otherwise your
hands will smell to high heaven for a week.


And don't get is on anything constructed by man - garden lights, stucco
walls, metal rails, clothing. Now here there are long lists of
sensitive plants on the spray label, which is pages long. I seem to
recall lists of certain evergreen trees and fruit trees but little
else.
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Old 19-07-2003, 10:12 AM
Kirra
 
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Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?


"Daniel Hanna" wrote in message
home.com.au...
In Kirra wrote:
How do you deal with this? Should I avoid dormant spraying these roses
or attempt to spray/pour right against the canes so that there is no
drift onto the companion plants?


Kirra, in the days when I was a lad (lol) and had companion plants, I
used a nice soft sponge dipped in lime sulphur solution and wiped the
bare canes with it.

Plenty of plants wouldn't mind lime sulphur, but then again plenty would,
too.

One tip - if you do this trick, use waterproof gloves. Otherwise your
hands will smell to high heaven for a week.


I love roses but I also like something in between to cover the naked legs
The sponge idea sounds just like what I am after. I have a paid of blue
Ansell chemical gloves that go up to the forearm and should do the trick to
protect me from the smell.

Thanks,

Kirra





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Old 19-07-2003, 10:22 AM
Kirra
 
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Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?

"Cass" wrote in message
.. .
One tip - if you do this trick, use waterproof gloves. Otherwise your
hands will smell to high heaven for a week.


And don't get is on anything constructed by man - garden lights, stucco
walls, metal rails, clothing. Now here there are long lists of
sensitive plants on the spray label, which is pages long. I seem to
recall lists of certain evergreen trees and fruit trees but little
else.


Thanks, Cass. Does this apply to wooden fences and clothes line? My climbers
are on a wooden fence and attached with clothes line (green). It sounds like
I may have to use the sponge on quite a few roses to avoid getting any lime
sulphur on the fence and on the lilly pillies that are interplanted between
my climbers.

Kirra


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Old 19-07-2003, 04:22 PM
Cass
 
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Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?

In article , Kirra
wrote:

"Cass" wrote in message
.. .
One tip - if you do this trick, use waterproof gloves. Otherwise your
hands will smell to high heaven for a week.


And don't get is on anything constructed by man - garden lights, stucco
walls, metal rails, clothing. Now here there are long lists of
sensitive plants on the spray label, which is pages long. I seem to
recall lists of certain evergreen trees and fruit trees but little
else.


Thanks, Cass. Does this apply to wooden fences and clothes line? My climbers
are on a wooden fence and attached with clothes line (green). It sounds like
I may have to use the sponge on quite a few roses to avoid getting any lime
sulphur on the fence and on the lilly pillies that are interplanted between
my climbers.


I didn't notice the discoloration of my climber supports, to tell you
the truth. I would just spray a wood fence at my house, but then I'm a
bit of a slob. My fence is not painted. Now that you mention it, I have
a lot of companion plants. And while I didn't go out of my way to spray
them, I didn't avoid them either. I didn't have any losses, but I don't
grow lilies, or not Asiatic lillies, at least.

Metal is the one thing you really don't want to spray. And take
measures not to breathe that stuff or get it on your skin. I mean how
harmless can it be if it reacts with metal?
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Old 19-07-2003, 04:42 PM
Scopata Fuori
 
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Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?


.. I mean how
harmless can it be if it reacts with metal?



That's what I say, too. Drink beer, not water. Look what it does to iron!



Scopata Fuori


ObRoses: Bonica is sending up 4 foot basals...looks strange, hovering
above an otherwise fairly lowgrowing, spreading plant. I think I will let
them go, and see if I get enough growth to fill it in, so it looks normal.

No blackspot, despite rain and a damp couple of days, but botryitis is still
rearing its ugly head.





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Old 19-07-2003, 06:52 PM
Cass
 
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Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?

In article , Scopata Fuori
wrote:

I mean how
harmless can it be if it reacts with metal?



That's what I say, too. Drink beer, not water. Look what it does to iron!


Touche. However, the effects of ingesting lime sulfur are clearly more
harmful than the effects of inhaling water vapor. Of the organic
sprays, this is one of the most dangerous.

Look at the MSDS:
http://www.montereychemical.com/msds...meSulSol-m.pdf
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Old 19-07-2003, 11:52 PM
Anne Lurie
 
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Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?

"Kirra" began by saying

It is getting towards pruning time here in Australia and I would like to

use
lime sulphur spray on my roses after pruning

[I confess to snipping a *lot*]

Then Kirra said
I love roses but I also like something in between to cover the naked legs



As the saying goes, I wouldn't go near that line with 10-foot pole! But
could someone please give me a hint what lime sulphur is supposed to do for
roses in the first place?

Thanks!

Anne Lurie [at the corner of Irreverent & Irrelevant]
Raleigh, NC





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Old 20-07-2003, 02:34 PM
Kirra
 
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Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?

"Anne Lurie" wrote in message
. com...
Then Kirra said
I love roses but I also like something in between to cover the naked

legs


As the saying goes, I wouldn't go near that line with 10-foot pole! But
could someone please give me a hint what lime sulphur is supposed to do

for
roses in the first place?

Thanks!

Anne Lurie [at the corner of Irreverent & Irrelevant]
Raleigh, NC


Hi Anne,

Lime Sulphur is a spray that is used after pruning to clean up overwintering
spores of black spot and several other nasties. It is only used after
pruning because it will damage any fresh growth (or any leaves) on the
roses. Here is a link that offers a much better explanation:

http://www.greengold.com.au/greengol...TES/roses.htm#
%20Yates%20Lime%20Sulphur

(Not trying to promote any particular product but it had the best
explanation after about 6 different links from Google)

Kirra
Brisbane, Australia
zone 10


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Old 20-07-2003, 02:34 PM
Kirra
 
Posts: n/a
Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?

"Anne Lurie" wrote in message
. com...
Then Kirra said
I love roses but I also like something in between to cover the naked

legs


As the saying goes, I wouldn't go near that line with 10-foot pole! But
could someone please give me a hint what lime sulphur is supposed to do

for
roses in the first place?

Thanks!

Anne Lurie [at the corner of Irreverent & Irrelevant]
Raleigh, NC


Hi Anne,

Lime Sulphur is a spray that is used after pruning to clean up overwintering
spores of black spot and several other nasties. It is only used after
pruning because it will damage any fresh growth (or any leaves) on the
roses. Here is a link that offers a much better explanation:

http://www.greengold.com.au/greengol...TES/roses.htm#
%20Yates%20Lime%20Sulphur

(Not trying to promote any particular product but it had the best
explanation after about 6 different links from Google)

Kirra
Brisbane, Australia
zone 10


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Old 20-07-2003, 04:32 PM
Daniel Hanna
 
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Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?

In Kirra wrote:
It is only used after
pruning because it will damage any fresh growth (or any leaves) on the
roses.


Actually, Kirra, it can be used any time of the year. Even the Yates
product instructions say that (I've got a bottle myself!). You just use
it at 10 ml per litre of spray instead of 20 ml/L.

I've used it on powdery mildew mid season, to great effect. No foliage
burning problems, but it did make the foliage smell awful. The side
benefit of this was that a rogue possum decided that my roses were now a
bit too spicy for its palate. Awww.
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Old 21-07-2003, 12:33 AM
Kirra
 
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Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?


"Daniel Hanna" wrote in message
home.com.au...
In Kirra wrote:
It is only used after
pruning because it will damage any fresh growth (or any leaves) on the
roses.


Actually, Kirra, it can be used any time of the year. Even the Yates
product instructions say that (I've got a bottle myself!). You just use
it at 10 ml per litre of spray instead of 20 ml/L.

I've used it on powdery mildew mid season, to great effect. No foliage
burning problems, but it did make the foliage smell awful. The side
benefit of this was that a rogue possum decided that my roses were now a
bit too spicy for its palate. Awww.


Hmm ... I must admit that I haven't bought a bottle of it yet. I was just
going by things I had read about it but they were obviously talking about
dormant concentration. It's good to know that I will be able to use it at
other times as well.

Do you think grasshoppers might also decide that it is too spicy? I had a
number of them last year who not only liked to munch the leave to get them
to look like lace and eat the blooms but who also decided that eating
through the canes was quite scrumptious. I had to cut back three big
basils/laterals on my climbing peace because of those critters eating 3/4 of
the way through canes.

Kirra
Brisbane, Australia
zone 10


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Old 21-07-2003, 03:02 PM
Daniel Hanna
 
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Default Any effect of dormant spray on companion plants?

In Kirra wrote:
Do you think grasshoppers might also decide that it is too spicy? I
had a number of them last year who not only liked to munch the leave
to get them to look like lace and eat the blooms but who also decided
that eating through the canes was quite scrumptious. I had to cut back
three big basils/laterals on my climbing peace because of those
critters eating 3/4 of the way through canes.


Sure, give it a go. Lime sulphur is persistent enough to last a couple
of rainstorms, as is Mancozeb.

Since you're here in Oz you might also look at 'Garden Doctor' by
Chemspray. It is an old-fashioned powder spray mix containing sulphur
based fungicides and malathion insecticide. Spicy AND lethal!


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