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Old 27-10-2014, 04:09 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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I know this is not uk.rec.fungus, but does anyone know what this might be?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/timjwa...537633/sizes/l

It's in my lawn, near some trees, about 4-5" tall from ground to dome
and about 2" thick stem, 3" dia dome.

It's so weird I have to ask! Never seen one like it...

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Old 27-10-2014, 07:51 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:09:50 +0000, Tim Watts wrote:

I know this is not uk.rec.fungus, but does anyone know what this might
be?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/timjwa...537633/sizes/l

It's in my lawn, near some trees, about 4-5" tall from ground to dome
and about 2" thick stem, 3" dia dome.

It's so weird I have to ask! Never seen one like it...


Maybe Lycoperdon pyriforme or Lycoperdon perlatum (a bit bigger)? Very
common and sadly without culinary interest.

Had a nice plate of Macrolepiota and Coprinus comatus at lunch today from
an early walk. There aren't many bolets this year (at least so far) but
tonnes of Hydnum, we've never seen so many which is OK as we like them
very much!

-E



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Old 27-10-2014, 08:04 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 27/10/14 19:51, Emery Davis wrote:
On Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:09:50 +0000, Tim Watts wrote:

I know this is not uk.rec.fungus, but does anyone know what this might
be?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/timjwa...537633/sizes/l

It's in my lawn, near some trees, about 4-5" tall from ground to dome
and about 2" thick stem, 3" dia dome.

It's so weird I have to ask! Never seen one like it...


Maybe Lycoperdon pyriforme or Lycoperdon perlatum (a bit bigger)? Very
common and sadly without culinary interest.


Thanks - found on google.

Had a nice plate of Macrolepiota and Coprinus comatus at lunch today from
an early walk. There aren't many bolets this year (at least so far) but
tonnes of Hydnum, we've never seen so many which is OK as we like them
very much!


You're brave! I would be to scared to eat mushrooms I found lying about!
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Old 27-10-2014, 09:56 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On Mon, 27 Oct 2014 20:04:18 +0000, Tim Watts wrote:

You're brave! I would be to scared to eat mushrooms I found lying about!


Then you would be right not to eat them. They weren't found "lying
about" of course but growing in their expected habitats.



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Old 27-10-2014, 10:24 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 27/10/14 21:56, Emery Davis wrote:
On Mon, 27 Oct 2014 20:04:18 +0000, Tim Watts wrote:

You're brave! I would be to scared to eat mushrooms I found lying about!


Then you would be right not to eat them. They weren't found "lying
about" of course but growing in their expected habitats.




I understand that much of naming a mushroom is recognition of where they
are growing as much as what they look like... I think I'm averse because
a nice one can look so much like a super toxic version.


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Old 27-10-2014, 10:54 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On Mon, 27 Oct 2014 22:24:03 +0000, Tim Watts wrote:

I understand that much of naming a mushroom is recognition of where they
are growing as much as what they look like... I think I'm averse because
a nice one can look so much like a super toxic version.


Not any of the ones we eat. I'm cautious and experienced, we don't go
near anything that can be confused with something really nasty.

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Old 28-10-2014, 08:48 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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In article ,
Emery Davis wrote:
On Mon, 27 Oct 2014 22:24:03 +0000, Tim Watts wrote:

I understand that much of naming a mushroom is recognition of where they
are growing as much as what they look like... I think I'm averse because
a nice one can look so much like a super toxic version.


Not any of the ones we eat. I'm cautious and experienced, we don't go
near anything that can be confused with something really nasty.


There are some safe and simple rules, but even they need some
experience to interpret correctly. Not a lot, but it isn't all
that easy to pick up from books alone.

Blewitts are ones I have always been chary of, because there are
some similar-looking fungi that are definitely poisonous.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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Old 28-10-2014, 09:52 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 28/10/14 08:48, Nick Maclaren wrote:
Blewitts are ones I have always been chary of, because there are
some similar-looking fungi that are definitely poisonous.


Even they are mildly haemolytic when raw - hence the requirement
to cook them.

One day, probably when the timing of my life's end is known, I'm
going to pluck up enough courage to find and eat an amanita caesarea.
Let's hope I can still taste and smell it.

Now, when should I eat my 1987 jam made from Cambridge Royal
strawberries from Chivers' farm in Histon? Ah, decisions, decisions.

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Old 28-10-2014, 11:52 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On Tue, 28 Oct 2014 09:52:15 +0000, Tom Gardner wrote:

On 28/10/14 08:48, Nick Maclaren wrote:
Blewitts are ones I have always been chary of, because there are some
similar-looking fungi that are definitely poisonous.


Even they are mildly haemolytic when raw - hence the requirement to cook
them.


But they are very delicious. I agree though, I get a second opinion for
blewitts. Haven't seen any yet this year, although there was a huge
crop on the leaf pile last year.

We eat plenty that need to be cooked, Boletus erythropus is one of the
best boletes, poisonous uncooked. It also turns blue rapidly, which puts
some people off.

One day, probably when the timing of my life's end is known, I'm going
to pluck up enough courage to find and eat an amanita caesarea.
Let's hope I can still taste and smell it.


The problem there is that there are plenty of Amanita muscaria that don't
present warts, so you could make yourself see God just before going to
meet her/him personally!

-E




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Old 28-10-2014, 08:48 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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"Nick Maclaren" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Emery Davis wrote:
On Mon, 27 Oct 2014 22:24:03 +0000, Tim Watts wrote:

I understand that much of naming a mushroom is recognition of where they
are growing as much as what they look like... I think I'm averse because
a nice one can look so much like a super toxic version.


Not any of the ones we eat. I'm cautious and experienced, we don't go
near anything that can be confused with something really nasty.


There are some safe and simple rules, but even they need some
experience to interpret correctly. Not a lot, but it isn't all
that easy to pick up from books alone.

Blewitts are ones I have always been chary of, because there are
some similar-looking fungi that are definitely poisonous.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.


I was fairly confident of a mushroom so I ate it. Bad idea. Turned me
inside out even though I have a book and I really thought I'd identified it
as safe.
I now only eat mushrooms from the supermarket and I suggest that if anyone
isn't a specialist at fungi identification does the same.
My neighbours eat blewitts and they haven't died yet.













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Old 29-10-2014, 12:35 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On Tue, 28 Oct 2014 20:48:50 +0000, Christina Websell wrote:

I now only eat mushrooms from the supermarket and I suggest that if
anyone isn't a specialist at fungi identification does the same.
My neighbours eat blewitts and they haven't died yet.


Was it a blewitt type mushroom you ran afoul of? The trouble with
blewitts is they can be confused with various Corinarius. And there are
a lot of them that will make you sick or even kill you.

Maybe you should have checked the mushroom with the neighbors!

-E

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Old 29-10-2014, 06:04 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On 29/10/2014 12:35, Emery Davis wrote:
On Tue, 28 Oct 2014 20:48:50 +0000, Christina Websell wrote:

I now only eat mushrooms from the supermarket and I suggest that if
anyone isn't a specialist at fungi identification does the same.
My neighbours eat blewitts and they haven't died yet.


Was it a blewitt type mushroom you ran afoul of? The trouble with
blewitts is they can be confused with various Corinarius. And there are
a lot of them that will make you sick or even kill you.

Maybe you should have checked the mushroom with the neighbors!

-E

What, feed it to them first?
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Old 29-10-2014, 10:39 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On Wed, 29 Oct 2014 18:04:25 +0000, David wrote:

On 29/10/2014 12:35, Emery Davis wrote:
On Tue, 28 Oct 2014 20:48:50 +0000, Christina Websell wrote:

I now only eat mushrooms from the supermarket and I suggest that if
anyone isn't a specialist at fungi identification does the same. My
neighbours eat blewitts and they haven't died yet.


Was it a blewitt type mushroom you ran afoul of? The trouble with
blewitts is they can be confused with various Corinarius. And there
are a lot of them that will make you sick or even kill you.

Maybe you should have checked the mushroom with the neighbors!

-E

What, feed it to them first?


And watch their reactions!

Seriously, I'm interested in what Christine thought she had.

I meant cortinarius above.

-E



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Old 30-10-2014, 07:54 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On Tue, 28 Oct 2014 20:48:50 -0000,
Christina Websell wrote:

I now only eat mushrooms from the supermarket and I suggest that if anyone
isn't a specialist at fungi identification does the same.


In France, some replaced « bon appetit » par « bonne chance » after the
most recent foods scandals and in view of those in preparation.

And I feel really fine saying “Good Luck” in view of edibles from the
supermarket!

How is it in the UK? Is there a way to “trace” anything back to its
origin? The huge French companies (and some of the Germans which invade
France in the low-cost sector) begin to pervert the organic farming
scene by advertising “local” produce of farmers who do not even know,
that they produced milk, while they are really specialized in vegetables
and the like, nor furnish supermarkets...

Forest Mushrooms from Leclerc... Lidl or Carrefour give me the shivers.

Michael
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Old 30-10-2014, 10:44 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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On Thu, 30 Oct 2014 08:54:31 +0100, Michael Uplawski wrote:

Forest Mushrooms from Leclerc... Lidl or Carrefour give me the shivers.


Well, most "forest mushrooms" you see in the above will be from Eastern
Europe.

But don't confuse Leclerc with Lidl or Carrefour Market: the former
actually does use local producers (as does Intermarche), I can think of 3
people offhand that supply both supermarkets. Note that they only supply
local branches, mostly because the supermarkets demand quantities which
are difficult for small producers to keep up with: IIRC Leclerc in
Argentan wouldn't do business with a certain poultry producer until he
could produce around 300 birds/month. Which is quite a lot. And very
good birds they are. Of course they also finish by undercutting price on
what the man himself sells them for.

If a supermarket can't tell you exactly where it comes from locally, IMO
you shouldn't buy it, especially around here where there are a plethora
of local producers to choose from.

Sorry, veering OT! But I do think traceability is much worse in the UK
than in France, and that "buying local" is very important for both
economical and ecological reasons.

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