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Old 05-12-2006, 09:02 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default Isn't it funny how...



lynx wrote:

Ask
the next mowing contractor you see and he'll tell you why he doesn't
use them either.



I will.




Hi Kids,

I've just tuned in to this - er - discussion.

I'm a lawn mowing contractor, I use a Honda Buffalo (HRU216D) and/or a
Rover ProCut 560. I mulch with both.

Having said that, not all lawns are OK to mulch.

If the grass is too long or wet, it won't mulch very well and doesn't
look as nice at the end of the job. Some lawns mulch better than others;
mot of my customers have Kikuyu lawns which mulch pretty well. I've
found Couch and Tall Fescues don't mulch too well.

Even with lawns that I regularly mulch, every fourth cut I catch the
grass, just to give it a break (as per instructions and most of the lawn
growing texts I've ever read).

Quite a lot of other contractors mulch lawns (I'm in Adelaide). Your
local situation may differ.

Hope this helps.


Cheers,
Goldstein


  #32   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 09:04 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
Oz Oz is offline
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Default Isn't it funny how...

"lynx" wrote in message
...
Oz wrote:

"ros " casscat??ATiinetdotnetdotau wrote in message
...

i know... but i can't do NOTHING just because business is water
expensive. that will change eventually, i hope...

it's not always convenient to do the washing machine/grey water thing,
esp at night, but i have it draining into a big rubbish bin, from which
i syphon it when it suits me... and i'm sick of tripping over buckets
in the shower but when those buckets provide all the water i need for
several shrubs, it sort of seems worthwhile...

i dunno, perhaps it just makes me feel better, and that can't be a bad
thing )


"lynx" wrote in message
...

imorf wrote:


ros wrote:

My lawn is pretty green too - i use ALL my grey water from washing
machine (front loader), shower (yes, savers) and rinse water from the
kitchen sink on the grass and plants etc. Adds up to quite a lot,
and everything's thriving, tho i did change my washing powder to
phosphate free 'green care' liquid - aus made, and works great.

/pat on the back.

Meanwhile industry uses how many thousands/millions of litres daily?



My next house is going to be designed along the lines of a house boat in
regards to water use, grey water is stored in a separate tank and then
used for things like flushing the toilet and in a house it could also be
pumped onto the gardens, you just have to change to phosphate free soaps
etc.
I'm actually in the planning stages of doing this to my existing house,
especially if restrictions get worse, fortunately mu house is on piers,
that makes it easier to get under there and make the necessary plumbing
changes etc a low level tank along the back of the house will hold the
grey water, only the kitchen sink and toilets will flush directly into
the sewerage system and the rest will be diverted to the tank where a
pump will keep the cisterns in the toilets filled and the rest will go on
the garden etc, already have a large rainwater tank, for the families
drinking water, I estimate I can reduce my water consumption by around
50% this way



I've just fitted a diverter to the laundry outlet. Is it ok to allow the
wash water, i.e. soapy detergent water, to run onto the lawn? Or only the
rinse water?



I let everything to out on to my lawn, but I have a front loader and
therefore have to use a low suds detergent, but even before we owned a front
loader, we still used everything, the big difference being the higher suds
(read higher in phosphates) detergent we used in the top loader made the
lawn greener in patches, usually because I moved the outlet between cycles
to cover all the lawn and the areas that got the wash water greened up
better than the areas that only got the rinse water, it makes no difference
now as we are letting the tub next to the machine fill and then letting it
out, and because the front loader uses less water than the top loader, we
are getting a couple of cycles in there before we have to release instead of
having to empty for ever cycle on the old machine.

--

I'm Off to see the Wizard....

Oz



  #33   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 11:16 PM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
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Posts: 12
Default Isn't it funny how...


lynx wrote:
Oz wrote:

"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ups.com...

Jen wrote:

"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ps.com...


"The grass clippings left behind by a mulching mower essentially
function as a lawn fertilizer, as if you were applying compost to the
lawn.

Compost gets to very high temperatures, that's another reason
compost/grass
clippings should be composted first.

As for fertilising, like someone else said, dead organic matter takes
nutrients *out* of the soil until it's properly composted.

That's correct, yet our resident member of The Australian Society of
Horticultural Science doesn't even know the basics it seems.


Maybe you better have a good long think there, Mulching mowers dont leave
large clumps of dead matter on the lawn, it is cut up very finely and
because of this it is deposited below the growth line of the lawn, it acts
as a mulch to the inhibit evaporation and breakes down VERY QUICLKY =====
this is the important bit.


Right.

Large masses of static organic matter break down very slowly, they generate a
lot of heat and amonia during the decaying process, the debris left by a
mulching mower is very small and very fine particles, spread in a thin layer
throughout the lawn, when they break down they produce vurtualy no heat and
vurtualy no amonia, instead they contribute their nutrients to the top soil
much faster than if the same organic matter was caught and stored in a pile
to break down.


Right again. In fact the particles are so fine, they really don't have
to 'break down'.


If they don't have to break down, how are the nutrients released? You
didn't think that one through before hitting the 'send' key did you
buddy?

  #34   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 11:39 PM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2006
Posts: 11
Default Isn't it funny how...

I dont really worry about how this stuff works, as long as I dont have to
rake up the grass, or empty the catcher. Nature takes care of the rest.
Unless you are a thoroughly out of reality type gardeners, its not really a
worry. Are you going to enter your lawn in a contest?Stop bickering about
crap. There's more important stuff than this to worry about.
Like how am I going to avoid those lousy cricket commentaries....
"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ps.com...

lynx wrote:
Oz wrote:

"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ups.com...

Jen wrote:

"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ps.com...


"The grass clippings left behind by a mulching mower essentially
function as a lawn fertilizer, as if you were applying compost to
the
lawn.

Compost gets to very high temperatures, that's another reason
compost/grass
clippings should be composted first.

As for fertilising, like someone else said, dead organic matter takes
nutrients *out* of the soil until it's properly composted.

That's correct, yet our resident member of The Australian Society of
Horticultural Science doesn't even know the basics it seems.


Maybe you better have a good long think there, Mulching mowers dont
leave
large clumps of dead matter on the lawn, it is cut up very finely and
because of this it is deposited below the growth line of the lawn, it
acts
as a mulch to the inhibit evaporation and breakes down VERY QUICLKY
=====
this is the important bit.


Right.

Large masses of static organic matter break down very slowly, they
generate a
lot of heat and amonia during the decaying process, the debris left by
a
mulching mower is very small and very fine particles, spread in a thin
layer
throughout the lawn, when they break down they produce vurtualy no heat
and
vurtualy no amonia, instead they contribute their nutrients to the top
soil
much faster than if the same organic matter was caught and stored in a
pile
to break down.


Right again. In fact the particles are so fine, they really don't have
to 'break down'.


If they don't have to break down, how are the nutrients released? You
didn't think that one through before hitting the 'send' key did you
buddy?



  #35   Report Post  
Old 05-12-2006, 11:49 PM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Aug 2006
Posts: 149
Default Why mowing contractors do not use mulching mowers

Simple;

1) If people pay you to mow their lawn, they expect to see something for
the $$$ and bags of grass clippings adds to their satisfaction.

2) Some people do not like the fine mulched grass that a mulching mower
leaves behind.

3) You become upgrade to a lawn maintenance consultant and charge more
because you then can add a "lawn fertilising service."


  #36   Report Post  
Old 06-12-2006, 06:27 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2006
Posts: 13
Default Isn't it funny how...

TG'sFM wrote:

lynx wrote:

Oz wrote:

"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ups.com...

Jen wrote:

"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ps.com...

"The grass clippings left behind by a mulching mower essentially
function as a lawn fertilizer, as if you were applying compost to the
lawn.

Compost gets to very high temperatures, that's another reason
compost/grass
clippings should be composted first.

As for fertilising, like someone else said, dead organic matter takes
nutrients *out* of the soil until it's properly composted.

That's correct, yet our resident member of The Australian Society of
Horticultural Science doesn't even know the basics it seems.

Maybe you better have a good long think there, Mulching mowers dont leave
large clumps of dead matter on the lawn, it is cut up very finely and
because of this it is deposited below the growth line of the lawn, it acts
as a mulch to the inhibit evaporation and breakes down VERY QUICLKY =====
this is the important bit.

Right.

Large masses of static organic matter break down very slowly, they generate a
lot of heat and amonia during the decaying process, the debris left by a
mulching mower is very small and very fine particles, spread in a thin layer
throughout the lawn, when they break down they produce vurtualy no heat and
vurtualy no amonia, instead they contribute their nutrients to the top soil
much faster than if the same organic matter was caught and stored in a pile
to break down.


Right again. In fact the particles are so fine, they really don't have
to 'break down'.


If they don't have to break down, how are the nutrients released? You
didn't think that one through before hitting the 'send' key did you
buddy?



Duh! It's relative, numb nuts. They don't need to break down anywhere
near the extent that clippings do.


--

rgds,

Pete
=====
http://pw352.blogspot.com/
'(A)bort, (R)etry, (P)anic (D)eny this ever happened!'


  #37   Report Post  
Old 06-12-2006, 06:35 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Posts: 131
Default Why mowing contractors do not use mulching mowers

On Wed, 06 Dec 2006 09:49:53 +1100, Terryc wrote:

Simple;

1) If people pay you to mow their lawn, they expect to see something for
the $$$ and bags of grass clippings adds to their satisfaction.

2) Some people do not like the fine mulched grass that a mulching mower
leaves behind.

3) You become upgrade to a lawn maintenance consultant and charge more
because you then can add a "lawn fertilising service."


Leaving chopped up grass on your lawn is not a good idea.

Far better to compost the clippings for at least 6 months then put them on the garden.


  #38   Report Post  
Old 06-12-2006, 07:30 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2006
Posts: 12
Default Isn't it funny how...


lynx wrote:
TG'sFM wrote:

lynx wrote:

Oz wrote:

"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ups.com...

Jen wrote:

"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ps.com...

"The grass clippings left behind by a mulching mower essentially
function as a lawn fertilizer, as if you were applying compost to the
lawn.

Compost gets to very high temperatures, that's another reason
compost/grass
clippings should be composted first.

As for fertilising, like someone else said, dead organic matter takes
nutrients *out* of the soil until it's properly composted.

That's correct, yet our resident member of The Australian Society of
Horticultural Science doesn't even know the basics it seems.

Maybe you better have a good long think there, Mulching mowers dont leave
large clumps of dead matter on the lawn, it is cut up very finely and
because of this it is deposited below the growth line of the lawn, it acts
as a mulch to the inhibit evaporation and breakes down VERY QUICLKY =====
this is the important bit.

Right.

Large masses of static organic matter break down very slowly, they generate a
lot of heat and amonia during the decaying process, the debris left by a
mulching mower is very small and very fine particles, spread in a thin layer
throughout the lawn, when they break down they produce vurtualy no heat and
vurtualy no amonia, instead they contribute their nutrients to the top soil
much faster than if the same organic matter was caught and stored in a pile
to break down.


Right again. In fact the particles are so fine, they really don't have
to 'break down'.


If they don't have to break down, how are the nutrients released? You
didn't think that one through before hitting the 'send' key did you
buddy?



Duh! It's relative, numb nuts. They don't need to break down anywhere
near the extent that clippings do.


Oh, I see. Why then didn't you actually say that then? That way you
wouldn't need to be backpedalling right now.

  #39   Report Post  
Old 06-12-2006, 06:40 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Posts: 805
Default Why mowing contractors do not use mulching mowers


"gardenlen" wrote in message
...
we've never collect the clip from the lawn, i always say to people (i
used to mow lawns for a living as well) the best place for the clip is
on the lawn.

for us it has meant no fertilising so no lawn grubs and also our lawns
grow thicker and lusher (without watering) and we also cut them higher
and in dier periods ourt lawn always looks greener longer.

On Wed, 06 Dec 2006 05:35:33 GMT, wrote:

On Wed, 06 Dec 2006 09:49:53 +1100, Terryc

wrote:

Simple;

1) If people pay you to mow their lawn, they expect to see something

for
the $$$ and bags of grass clippings adds to their satisfaction.

2) Some people do not like the fine mulched grass that a mulching mower
leaves behind.

3) You become upgrade to a lawn maintenance consultant and charge more
because you then can add a "lawn fertilising service."


Leaving chopped up grass on your lawn is not a good idea.

Far better to compost the clippings for at least 6 months then put them

on the garden.

I disagree with whomever thinks that grass clippings left on the lawn are a
bad idea. They are actually a good way to go provided they are not left in
big clumps that can kill off the grass itself. Mulched grass will feed the
lawn and doesn't contribute to thatch. Composting grass is ok, the more
organic methods of farming (such as Masanobu Fukuoka) recommend leaving
plants nutrients where they lie to feed the soil. Removing the dead matter
removed nutrients. Leaving the clippings in the lawn retains the nutrients
where they are need.

rob


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Old 06-12-2006, 07:10 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Posts: 805
Default Why mowing contractors do not use mulching mowers


"George.com" wrote in message
...

"gardenlen" wrote in message
...
we've never collect the clip from the lawn, i always say to people (i
used to mow lawns for a living as well) the best place for the clip is
on the lawn.

for us it has meant no fertilising so no lawn grubs and also our lawns
grow thicker and lusher (without watering) and we also cut them higher
and in dier periods ourt lawn always looks greener longer.

On Wed, 06 Dec 2006 05:35:33 GMT, wrote:

On Wed, 06 Dec 2006 09:49:53 +1100, Terryc


wrote:

Simple;

1) If people pay you to mow their lawn, they expect to see something

for
the $$$ and bags of grass clippings adds to their satisfaction.

2) Some people do not like the fine mulched grass that a mulching

mower
leaves behind.

3) You become upgrade to a lawn maintenance consultant and charge

more
because you then can add a "lawn fertilising service."

Leaving chopped up grass on your lawn is not a good idea.

Far better to compost the clippings for at least 6 months then put them

on the garden.

I disagree with whomever thinks that grass clippings left on the lawn are

a
bad idea. They are actually a good way to go provided they are not left in
big clumps that can kill off the grass itself. Mulched grass will feed the
lawn and doesn't contribute to thatch. Composting grass is ok, the more
organic methods of farming (such as Masanobu Fukuoka) recommend leaving
plants nutrients where they lie to feed the soil. Removing the dead matter
removed nutrients. Leaving the clippings in the lawn retains the nutrients
where they are need.

rob


ps what happened to the website Len? Shut down for soliciting money?

rob




  #41   Report Post  
Old 06-12-2006, 08:07 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Posts: 205
Default Why mowing contractors do not use mulching mowers

we've never collect the clip from the lawn, i always say to people (i
used to mow lawns for a living as well) the best place for the clip is
on the lawn.

for us it has meant no fertilising so no lawn grubs and also our lawns
grow thicker and lusher (without watering) and we also cut them higher
and in dier periods ourt lawn always looks greener longer.



On Wed, 06 Dec 2006 05:35:33 GMT, wrote:

On Wed, 06 Dec 2006 09:49:53 +1100, Terryc wrote:

Simple;

1) If people pay you to mow their lawn, they expect to see something for
the $$$ and bags of grass clippings adds to their satisfaction.

2) Some people do not like the fine mulched grass that a mulching mower
leaves behind.

3) You become upgrade to a lawn maintenance consultant and charge more
because you then can add a "lawn fertilising service."


Leaving chopped up grass on your lawn is not a good idea.

Far better to compost the clippings for at least 6 months then put them on the garden.


With peace and brightest of blessings,

len

--
"Be Content With What You Have And
May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In
A World That You May Not Understand."
  #42   Report Post  
Old 07-12-2006, 11:27 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
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Posts: 12
Default Isn't it funny how...


0tterbot wrote:
"Jonno" wrote in message
u...
I dont really worry about how this stuff works, as long as I dont have to
rake up the grass, or empty the catcher. Nature takes care of the rest.
Unless you are a thoroughly out of reality type gardeners, its not really a
worry. Are you going to enter your lawn in a contest?Stop bickering about
crap.


au contraire - flame wars about mulch mowers are a very important thing!

There's more important stuff than this to worry about.
Like how am I going to avoid those lousy cricket commentaries....


listen to the abc radio cricket commentary instead! :-)
kylie


The problem with that is that you have to put up with Kerry O'Keafe
laugh at his own jokes.

  #43   Report Post  
Old 07-12-2006, 11:33 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
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Posts: 713
Default Isn't it funny how...

"Jonno" wrote in message
u...
I dont really worry about how this stuff works, as long as I dont have to
rake up the grass, or empty the catcher. Nature takes care of the rest.
Unless you are a thoroughly out of reality type gardeners, its not really a
worry. Are you going to enter your lawn in a contest?Stop bickering about
crap.


au contraire - flame wars about mulch mowers are a very important thing!

There's more important stuff than this to worry about.
Like how am I going to avoid those lousy cricket commentaries....


listen to the abc radio cricket commentary instead! :-)
kylie


  #44   Report Post  
Old 07-12-2006, 11:45 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
external usenet poster
 
First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 713
Default Isn't it funny how...

"TG'sFM" wrote in message
ups.com...

0tterbot wrote:
"Jonno" wrote in message
u...
I dont really worry about how this stuff works, as long as I dont have
to
rake up the grass, or empty the catcher. Nature takes care of the rest.
Unless you are a thoroughly out of reality type gardeners, its not
really a
worry. Are you going to enter your lawn in a contest?Stop bickering
about
crap.


au contraire - flame wars about mulch mowers are a very important thing!

There's more important stuff than this to worry about.
Like how am I going to avoid those lousy cricket commentaries....


listen to the abc radio cricket commentary instead! :-)
kylie


The problem with that is that you have to put up with Kerry O'Keafe
laugh at his own jokes.


jonathan agnew is all the consolation you will ever need!!
(i see your point, though).
kylie


  #45   Report Post  
Old 07-12-2006, 11:51 AM posted to aus.tv,aus.gardens,aus.general
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Dec 2006
Posts: 1
Default Isn't it funny how...

On Thu, 07 Dec 2006 10:33:00 GMT, "0tterbot" wrote:

au contraire - flame wars about mulch mowers are a very important thing!


And finally a Victa will emerge.....!!!!!
(I personally believe that was one of my better efforts).....


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