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Old 28-02-2007, 12:46 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default worms! (book recommendation)

firstly, i am thrilled to announce that after nearly 6 months of work, i am
getting more & more & more worms (having started from a worm population of
approximately none - when i first began planting, i could have cried. the
only worms i had were some which hitchhiked in my compost bin). this is very
exciting for me as much of our soil is acid clay riddled with rocks. it's
becoming loamier, browner, crumblier, healthy-and-good-smelling and
(obviously) wormier in front of my eyes. despite the horrible soil, i've
been actually quite pleased with how much is going _right_ in the garden,
which is a boost to the confidence as well. because i have about as much
patience as a newborn baby, i couldn't see the point in putting off planting
while i improved the soil - my philosophy being that planting will improve
the soil as well as provide an impetus to improvement anyway :-) so there's
my brag, thank you for reading g

secondly, a REALLY INTERESTING worm book i've borrowed from the library. i
will have to buy a copy as all the dry science stuff cannot possibly be
retained for long after the book goes back (or indeed 5 minutes after
reading).
david murphy: organic growing with worms - a handbook for a better
environment (penguin [viking imprint] 2005, isbn 0 670 04174 2)

it's all about worms (obviously), both in terms of physiology, behaviour,
i.d. etc; and how to save the earth (or at least your own garden) using
them, and also gives a lot of infomation both on worms in
gardening/agriculture and also farming the worms themselves either for your
own use or for profit. (it covers compost worms as well as earthworms.) it's
NOT a gardening book & isn't meant to be - the author concurs he actually
knows nothing about gardening - but more about what worms do and how they
effect the soil (and therefore the farm/garden) positively. as gardeners we
understand that the soil itself is so vitally important to success & that
"worms are good", but this book really gets into _how_ the process works &
by extension what one can do to encourage worms & then utilise their
tireless activity.

also as a side note, he explains how preparation 500 (biodynamics) actually
works - sort of. sadly, the term "cosmic forces" was used without enough
irony (sigh), but at least it's an explanation which makes actual sense. (i
strongly suspect one could make prep 500 without all the hoodoo & bullshit &
it would still work, now i've read a reasonably-rational explanation, i.e.
that the process itself - without the hoodoo - should work). (that's a rant
for another day, though). it tells you how to make your own prep 500 for
that matter.

highly recommended!!!
kylie



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Old 01-03-2007, 12:55 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default worms! (book recommendation)

"0tterbot" wrote in message
firstly, i am thrilled to announce that after nearly 6 months of work, i
am getting more & more & more worms


Congratulations! Having started my veggie garden with a similar situation,
I can understand your excitement.

(having started from a worm population of
approximately none - when i first began planting, i could have cried. the
only worms i had were some which hitchhiked in my compost bin). this is
very exciting for me as much of our soil is acid clay riddled with rocks.
it's becoming loamier, browner, crumblier, healthy-and-good-smelling and
(obviously) wormier in front of my eyes.


No doubt that horse poop has helped :-))

secondly, a REALLY INTERESTING worm book i've borrowed from the library. i
will have to buy a copy as all the dry science stuff cannot possibly be
retained for long after the book goes back (or indeed 5 minutes after
reading).
david murphy: organic growing with worms - a handbook for a better
environment (penguin [viking imprint] 2005, isbn 0 670 04174 2)


also as a side note, he explains how preparation 500 (biodynamics)
actually works - sort of. sadly, the term "cosmic forces" was used without
enough irony (sigh), but at least it's an explanation which makes actual
sense.


And what did he have to say (in a nut shell if you can give it) about
Formula 500 or was he too long winded?


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Old 01-03-2007, 12:19 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default worms! (book recommendation)

"FarmI" [email protected] be given wrote in message
...

No doubt that horse poop has helped :-))


i'll say! i've even put it on a spot where there actually wasn't any topsoil
at all; i scraped together some straw & leaves & put my blessed horsepoo on
top & mixed it all around a bit, & that spot is giving me my best-ever
lettuces (i'm not generally good at lettuce, but these ones are pretty
good!) all praise horse poo!

And what did he have to say (in a nut shell if you can give it) about
Formula 500 or was he too long winded?


it was actually covered very briefly. even more briefly:

firstly, assume you've read the book & are now more aware of bacteria's
relationship to worms & soil generally. :-)

in short, the 500 is composted cow poo that is absolutely chockers with
bacteria, in particular actinomycetes. it's been composted over winter at a
depth where the bacteria are warm enough to still be happy & eat the poo.
because you have dug & buried the cow horns, there is plenty of oxygen
available for them to complete their task. the fact that the horn is, er,
horn-shaped means oxygen can "follow" the bacteria down into the horn
(people have tried with other containers & it didn't work). bd-ers think the
keratin in the horn must have some sort of positive effect but nobody knows
(i'm thinking it might be because air can still pass through horn somewhat?
at any rate, a mr podolinsky, bd-er extraordinare, thinks other containers
block the "cosmic forces" but i am disinclined to think _that_ is what they
are blocking.)

when you dig it up & put it in water & stir it vigorously, you are
oxygenating the bacteria all over again, & so their population explodes. (at
this point he started on with "cosmic forces" & my eyes just rolled right
out of my head). bacteria can double in quantity in 20 minutes with
oxygenation, so as the stirring process is a long one, the result is a great
deal of bacteria. you strain, etc, & apply the solution at night, as u.v.
light would kill the bacteria, so by the time the sun comes up the bacteria
has had a chance to work its way into the soil, and the fact that it's full
moon apparently means soil moisture is drawn up somewhat to aid the bacteria
in entering. b.d. soil is therefore just hyper-bacterialised organic soil.
with so much more bacteria, the other animals (including worms) benefit, and
the whole system is therefore improved & improves on itself.

that's about it!!

i love these sorts of ideas, but all the faff about cosmic forces etc just
puts me off.

are you thinking about converting your farm to biodynamics?
kylie


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Old 01-03-2007, 03:27 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default worms! (book recommendation)

"0tterbot" wrote in message
"FarmI" [email protected] be given wrote in message


No doubt that horse poop has helped :-))


i'll say! i've even put it on a spot where there actually wasn't any
topsoil at all; i scraped together some straw & leaves & put my blessed
horsepoo on top & mixed it all around a bit, & that spot is giving me my
best-ever lettuces (i'm not generally good at lettuce, but these ones are
pretty good!) all praise horse poo!


Perhaps it wasn't the horse poop but cosmic forces???????????????

Actually I'm always gobbsmacked by how astoundingly well the earth can
respond. I started my veg garden on what had effectively been "virgin"
soil. This farm was originally a soldier settler block which wasn't cleared
until the 60s and where the veg garden is had never even been pasture
improved - just the claysubsoil (to describe it as being topsoil would be
laughable) with lots of quartz and shale rocks and not a worm in sight and
with limited native grasses as cover. Your description of your place fits
very well with my own experience. But, give even that unpromising start a
bit of help and care and all that soil biota just seems to burst into life,
but the effort has to go on for a few years.

And what did he have to say (in a nut shell if you can give it) about
Formula 500 or was he too long winded?


it was actually covered very briefly. even more briefly:

firstly, assume you've read the book & are now more aware of bacteria's
relationship to worms & soil generally. :-)

in short, the 500 is composted cow poo that is absolutely chockers with
bacteria, in particular actinomycetes. it's been composted over winter at
a depth where the bacteria are warm enough to still be happy & eat the
poo. because you have dug & buried the cow horns, there is plenty of
oxygen available for them to complete their task. the fact that the horn
is, er, horn-shaped means oxygen can "follow" the bacteria down into the
horn (people have tried with other containers & it didn't work). bd-ers
think the keratin in the horn must have some sort of positive effect but
nobody knows (i'm thinking it might be because air can still pass through
horn somewhat? at any rate, a mr podolinsky, bd-er extraordinare, thinks
other containers block the "cosmic forces" but i am disinclined to think
_that_ is what they are blocking.)

when you dig it up & put it in water & stir it vigorously, you are
oxygenating the bacteria all over again, & so their population explodes.
(at this point he started on with "cosmic forces" & my eyes just rolled
right out of my head). bacteria can double in quantity in 20 minutes with
oxygenation, so as the stirring process is a long one, the result is a
great deal of bacteria. you strain, etc, & apply the solution at night, as
u.v. light would kill the bacteria, so by the time the sun comes up the
bacteria has had a chance to work its way into the soil, and the fact that
it's full moon apparently means soil moisture is drawn up somewhat to aid
the bacteria in entering. b.d. soil is therefore just hyper-bacterialised
organic soil. with so much more bacteria, the other animals (including
worms) benefit, and the whole system is therefore improved & improves on
itself.

that's about it!!


Thank you for the description, which actually makes sense when put in that
way. Friendly bacteria, bred in an environment much as we would breed
earthworms and then used in a way that will cause least loss of the
bacterial benefits.

i love these sorts of ideas, but all the faff about cosmic forces etc just
puts me off.


Yes - rather gag making but then it does seem to work, but I keep asking
could it work without all that faffing about and the way you describe it,
then it would appear that it could.

are you thinking about converting your farm to biodynamics?


No bloody way! I like our animals to be protected by the correct
vaccinations for illnesses such as the clostridial diseases and from my
reading it seems that none of the broader "organic" schools of thought
believe in the use of vaccinations. I think that is daft and flying in the
face of good use of science. However, I certainly don't like to use
chemicals willy nilly either. Even glyphosate, which I think is a
reasonably good product, I use very sparingly and only when I can't get rid
of a weed by using a less intrusive method.

I've been nagging my husband for years now to check out the Yeomans Plow
(how's that for an Aussie company? - silly sods cant' even spell plough!).
The Yeomans seems to me to be a very sensible invention for soil airation
and improvement along the same lines and we veg gardeners try to achieve all
the time and I have finally managed to get him to show an interest - the
drought has done some good at long last but we still have to use some
herbicides on the pastures as some weeds are too invasive to be dealt with
by hand.



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Old 02-03-2007, 11:05 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default worms! (book recommendation)

"FarmI" [email protected] be given wrote in message
...
best-ever lettuces (i'm not generally good at lettuce, but these ones are
pretty good!) all praise horse poo!


Perhaps it wasn't the horse poop but cosmic forces???????????????


lol! stop that g

Actually I'm always gobbsmacked by how astoundingly well the earth can
respond. I started my veg garden on what had effectively been "virgin"
soil. This farm was originally a soldier settler block which wasn't
cleared until the 60s and where the veg garden is had never even been
pasture improved - just the claysubsoil (to describe it as being topsoil
would be laughable) with lots of quartz and shale rocks and not a worm in
sight and with limited native grasses as cover. Your description of your
place fits very well with my own experience. But, give even that
unpromising start a bit of help and care and all that soil biota just
seems to burst into life, but the effort has to go on for a few years.


i'm kind of assuming, the rest of my life g but i know it won't always be
as hard (work) as it is atm. it's encouraging to know it WILL happen. i'm
pretty sure any soil can be retrieved - it's just a question of how much it
is worth it to you to do so.

Thank you for the description, which actually makes sense when put in that
way. Friendly bacteria, bred in an environment much as we would breed
earthworms and then used in a way that will cause least loss of the
bacterial benefits.


that's exactly it, & don't you just wish they'd say so??!

i love these sorts of ideas, but all the faff about cosmic forces etc
just puts me off.


Yes - rather gag making but then it does seem to work, but I keep asking
could it work without all that faffing about and the way you describe it,
then it would appear that it could.


i really would think so. gather ye some boiled cow horns & give it a go :-)
(apparently the poo must be fresh, and from lactating cows for some reason).
what is annoying me extraordinarily is: anyone can see it works, yet almost
everyone is put off it because of all the cosmic twaddle. IF steiner had
made some attempt to work out in 1926 or whenever it was exactly how & why
it works, it could have become mainstream by now & we'd all be better off.
instead, the preparations cost a fortune, nobody will go into how or why it
works, & it's a minor (albeit growing) "movement" when it really should be
perfectly ordinary. wtf is a "cosmic force"? there are loads of them!
gravity, sunlight, weather, tides, bla bla bla.

are you thinking about converting your farm to biodynamics?


No bloody way! I like our animals to be protected by the correct
vaccinations for illnesses such as the clostridial diseases and from my
reading it seems that none of the broader "organic" schools of thought
believe in the use of vaccinations. I think that is daft and flying in
the face of good use of science. However, I certainly don't like to use
chemicals willy nilly either. Even glyphosate, which I think is a
reasonably good product, I use very sparingly and only when I can't get
rid of a weed by using a less intrusive method.

I've been nagging my husband for years now to check out the Yeomans Plow
(how's that for an Aussie company? - silly sods cant' even spell plough!).
The Yeomans seems to me to be a very sensible invention for soil airation
and improvement along the same lines and we veg gardeners try to achieve
all the time and I have finally managed to get him to show an interest -
the drought has done some good at long last but we still have to use some
herbicides on the pastures as some weeds are too invasive to be dealt with
by hand.


i'll have to look for the yeomans PLOUGH g. atm all i can contemplate is
one of those tiny ride-on jobs. big machinery is out of the question.
(really, i want a pair of donkeys and the type of plough they can pull for
me. :-)
kylie the luddite




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Old 02-03-2007, 02:28 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Default worms! (book recommendation)

"0tterbot" wrote in message
"FarmI" [email protected] be given wrote in message


Perhaps it wasn't the horse poop but cosmic forces???????????????


lol! stop that g


Sorry, couldn't resist it.

Actually I'm always gobbsmacked by how astoundingly well the earth can
respond. I started my veg garden on what had effectively been "virgin"
soil. This farm was originally a soldier settler block which wasn't
cleared until the 60s and where the veg garden is had never even been
pasture improved - just the claysubsoil (to describe it as being topsoil
would be laughable) with lots of quartz and shale rocks and not a worm in
sight and with limited native grasses as cover. Your description of your
place fits very well with my own experience. But, give even that
unpromising start a bit of help and care and all that soil biota just
seems to burst into life, but the effort has to go on for a few years.


i'm kind of assuming, the rest of my life g but i know it won't always
be as hard (work) as it is atm. it's encouraging to know it WILL happen.


Yes to all of those. The first 10 years are probably the worst/hardest.

i'm
pretty sure any soil can be retrieved - it's just a question of how much
it is worth it to you to do so.


Agreed, assuming of course that there is no real toxicity involved.
However, there are some situations which will always have a limited chance
of being "productive" because the inputs would be too great.

Thank you for the description, which actually makes sense when put in
that way. Friendly bacteria, bred in an environment much as we would
breed earthworms and then used in a way that will cause least loss of the
bacterial benefits.


that's exactly it, & don't you just wish they'd say so??!


Too simple to say it in plain english. Must better to invoke cosmic forces.

i love these sorts of ideas, but all the faff about cosmic forces etc
just puts me off.


Yes - rather gag making but then it does seem to work, but I keep asking
could it work without all that faffing about and the way you describe it,
then it would appear that it could.


i really would think so. gather ye some boiled cow horns & give it a go
:-)


As Mrs Beeton would have said: "first catch your cows............"

(apparently the poo must be fresh, and from lactating cows for some
reason).


Easy round here - more lactating and pooping cows that there has been grass
of recent times.

what is annoying me extraordinarily is: anyone can see it works, yet
almost everyone is put off it because of all the cosmic twaddle. IF
steiner had made some attempt to work out in 1926 or whenever it was
exactly how & why it works, it could have become mainstream by now & we'd
all be better off. instead, the preparations cost a fortune, nobody will
go into how or why it works, & it's a minor (albeit growing) "movement"
when it really should be perfectly ordinary. wtf is a "cosmic force"?
there are loads of them! gravity, sunlight, weather, tides, bla bla bla.


:-)) You may just have hit the nail on the head in your description of the
way it's done. Protection and nurturing of the bacteria from inception to
spreading. Most gardening is done at human convenience and not for the
benefit of microflora/biota.

are you thinking about converting your farm to biodynamics?


No bloody way! I like our animals to be protected by the correct
vaccinations for illnesses such as the clostridial diseases and from my
reading it seems that none of the broader "organic" schools of thought
believe in the use of vaccinations. I think that is daft and flying in
the face of good use of science. However, I certainly don't like to use
chemicals willy nilly either. Even glyphosate, which I think is a
reasonably good product, I use very sparingly and only when I can't get
rid of a weed by using a less intrusive method.

I've been nagging my husband for years now to check out the Yeomans Plow
(how's that for an Aussie company? - silly sods cant' even spell
plough!). The Yeomans seems to me to be a very sensible invention for
soil airation and improvement along the same lines and we veg gardeners
try to achieve all the time and I have finally managed to get him to
show an interest - the drought has done some good at long last but we
still have to use some herbicides on the pastures as some weeds are too
invasive to be dealt with by hand.


i'll have to look for the yeomans PLOUGH g.


But remember if you want to find it with google you must call it a PLOW ( I
assume that they must want to sell into the US market)

atm all i can contemplate is
one of those tiny ride-on jobs. big machinery is out of the question.


But do you have a farm and need to renovate pastures? If not, dont' worry
about it although it I think you would enjoy reading Yeomans. Most
committed gardeners seem to.

(really, i want a pair of donkeys and the type of plough they can pull for
me. :-)
kylie the luddite


Snort! You'll do anything to get pelleted manure!


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Old 03-03-2007, 11:44 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default worms! (book recommendation)

"FarmI" [email protected] be given wrote in message
...

:-)) You may just have hit the nail on the head in your description of
the way it's done. Protection and nurturing of the bacteria from
inception to spreading. Most gardening is done at human convenience and
not for the benefit of microflora/biota.


.... despite that the benefit of the biota is a benefit for the humans!! (i'm
wanting to get to the point where they do more work than i do ;-) i wonder
if they can be trained to sow seed?

i'll have to look for the yeomans PLOUGH g.


But remember if you want to find it with google you must call it a PLOW
( I assume that they must want to sell into the US market)


in fact, i put in "yeomans plough" and up it came first thing! that's what
meta-tags are for - you put in every conceivable spelling or misspelling
someone might make while looking for you - which in this case should include
"plow" in the meta-tags but not the business name, NOT the other way around.

i found it a weirdly-organised site, didn't have 12 minutes to download all
the plough photos & info, did not like their spelling & sent them a snippy
email to say so :-) if they want to think i'd have bought 25 ploughs if not
for their site arrangement & spelling, well all power to me g.

atm all i can contemplate is
one of those tiny ride-on jobs. big machinery is out of the question.


But do you have a farm and need to renovate pastures? If not, dont' worry
about it


yes i have a farm & yes i need to renovate pasture (well, i need to renovate
pasture into a better growing medium!!) my farm is tiny & even most of that
is bushland & is going to stay that way, so we are talking about a very tiny
scale indeed, comparitively speaking. that's one reason i can only
contemplate tiny machinery. the other reason is that it's just me. for
example, it took me many years to come to accept a power drill over a hand
drill (although i am fully converted now ;-)

people round here only have livestock & don't grow crops except tree crops
(or annual crops for pasture for their animals). looking at this one way,
it's quite obvious why - the soil's not "fertile" in the classic sense,
although obviously i'm exploring its potential. but looking at it another
way, it doesn't make that much sense, actually, so i think i would be onto a
good thing to have a mixture of things i am doing to get the farm to pay for
itself. (dh has a job so there's no rush with this - hence i ended up
focussing in the immediate term on making the land support US only, then it
can progress to supporting itself). i need systems! i'm trying to put them
in place but underestimated how long this all takes. the chicken-garden
system is well underway albeit still terribly time-consuming, the next
system will probably revolve around some little pigs to get bigger areas of
soil more fertile, and a bit of a house-cow system when the fences get
fixed. past owners have farmed commercially in the past (for most of its
history) but they're not here now, so i want to fix their messes & get on
with it myself.

although it I think you would enjoy reading Yeomans. Most
committed gardeners seem to.


i shall try again :-)

(really, i want a pair of donkeys and the type of plough they can pull
for me. :-)
kylie the luddite


Snort! You'll do anything to get pelleted manure!


would going into rhapsodies about their sweet fuzzy faces make any
difference?
kylie


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Old 04-03-2007, 07:01 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Default worms! (book recommendation)

In article ,
"0tterbot" wrote:

people round here only have livestock & don't grow crops except tree crops
(or annual crops for pasture for their animals). looking at this one way,
it's quite obvious why - the soil's not "fertile" in the classic sense,
although obviously i'm exploring its potential. but looking at it another
way, it doesn't make that much sense, actually, so i think i would be onto a
good thing to have a mixture of things i am doing to get the farm to pay for
itself. (dh has a job so there's no rush with this - hence i ended up
focussing in the immediate term on making the land support US only, then it
can progress to supporting itself). i need systems! i'm trying to put them
in place but underestimated how long this all takes. the chicken-garden
system is well underway albeit still terribly time-consuming, the next
system will probably revolve around some little pigs to get bigger areas of
soil more fertile, and a bit of a house-cow system when the fences get
fixed. past owners have farmed commercially in the past (for most of its
history) but they're not here now, so i want to fix their messes & get on
with it myself.


Have you considered something like alley-cropping? You'll find it mentioned
in peermaculture books, and I've seen it being done in the WA wheat belt.

--
Chookie -- Sydney, Australia
(Replace "foulspambegone" with "optushome" to reply)

"Parenthood is like the modern stone washing process for denim jeans. You may
start out crisp, neat and tough, but you end up pale, limp and wrinkled."
Kerry Cue
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Old 04-03-2007, 11:11 AM posted to aus.gardens
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First recorded activity by GardenBanter: Jul 2006
Posts: 713
Default worms! (book recommendation)

"Chookie" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"0tterbot" wrote:

people round here only have livestock & don't grow crops except tree
crops
(or annual crops for pasture for their animals). looking at this one way,
it's quite obvious why - the soil's not "fertile" in the classic sense,
although obviously i'm exploring its potential. but looking at it another
way, it doesn't make that much sense, actually, so i think i would be
onto a
good thing to have a mixture of things i am doing to get the farm to pay
for
itself. (dh has a job so there's no rush with this - hence i ended up
focussing in the immediate term on making the land support US only, then
it
can progress to supporting itself). i need systems! i'm trying to put
them
in place but underestimated how long this all takes. the chicken-garden
system is well underway albeit still terribly time-consuming, the next
system will probably revolve around some little pigs to get bigger areas
of
soil more fertile, and a bit of a house-cow system when the fences get
fixed. past owners have farmed commercially in the past (for most of its
history) but they're not here now, so i want to fix their messes & get on
with it myself.


Have you considered something like alley-cropping? You'll find it
mentioned
in peermaculture books, and I've seen it being done in the WA wheat belt.


permies make me scream.
kylie


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Old 05-03-2007, 08:42 AM posted to aus.gardens
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Posts: 301
Default worms! (book recommendation)

In article ,
"0tterbot" wrote:

Have you considered something like alley-cropping? You'll find it
mentioned
in peermaculture books, and I've seen it being done in the WA wheat belt.


permies make me scream.


puts in earplugs
Haven't we had this discussion?

--
Chookie -- Sydney, Australia
(Replace "foulspambegone" with "optushome" to reply)

"Parenthood is like the modern stone washing process for denim jeans. You may
start out crisp, neat and tough, but you end up pale, limp and wrinkled."
Kerry Cue


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Old 05-03-2007, 10:59 PM posted to aus.gardens
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Posts: 713
Default worms! (book recommendation)

"Chookie" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"0tterbot" wrote:

Have you considered something like alley-cropping? You'll find it
mentioned
in peermaculture books, and I've seen it being done in the WA wheat
belt.


permies make me scream.


puts in earplugs
Haven't we had this discussion?


we have. and i'm sorry to have given such a stupid response.

to answer a bit better - i'm pretty much of the view now that mixed cropping
is a much better idea.
kylie


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Old 09-03-2007, 10:33 AM posted to aus.gardens
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"FarmI" [email protected] be given wrote in message
...

i'll have to look for the yeomans PLOUGH g.


But remember if you want to find it with google you must call it a PLOW
( I assume that they must want to sell into the US market)

atm all i can contemplate is
one of those tiny ride-on jobs. big machinery is out of the question.


But do you have a farm and need to renovate pastures? If not, dont' worry
about it although it I think you would enjoy reading Yeomans. Most
committed gardeners seem to.


right. after a bit of back-and-forthing, yeomans have sent me their
catalogue, and various other burblings. i'm a bit horrified that they are
pro-nuclear. and also a bit horrified about other spelling mistakes (actual
mistakes) in their leaflets - but let's not go there again. perhaps i am
also horrified that, for a machinery company, they have a LOT of opinions
(albeit badly-spelled ;-). there is an element of horror that i have no idea
at all about farm machinery & can't make heads or tails of most of it. g
kylie


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Old 09-03-2007, 11:53 AM posted to aus.gardens
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In article ,
"0tterbot" wrote:


right. after a bit of back-and-forthing, yeomans have sent me their
catalogue, and various other burblings. i'm a bit horrified that they are
pro-nuclear. and also a bit horrified about other spelling mistakes (actual
mistakes) in their leaflets - but let's not go there again. perhaps i am
also horrified that, for a machinery company, they have a LOT of opinions
(albeit badly-spelled ;-).


I find some of the opinions of the Diggers Club a bit horrific (particularly
the nonsense they talk about native plants), but I still buy their seeds.

--
Chookie -- Sydney, Australia
(Replace "foulspambegone" with "optushome" to reply)

"Parenthood is like the modern stone washing process for denim jeans. You may
start out crisp, neat and tough, but you end up pale, limp and wrinkled."
Kerry Cue
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Old 09-03-2007, 12:51 PM posted to aus.gardens
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"0tterbot" wrote in message
"FarmI" [email protected] be given wrote in message


right. after a bit of back-and-forthing, yeomans have sent me their
catalogue, and various other burblings. i'm a bit horrified that they are
pro-nuclear.


Snort! These days I'm getting so browned off with so many things I see on
the news, I'm beginning to wonder if it's just me or if the whole world has
gone barking mad. If it's Howard, Ruddock, Downer, Denam or Iemma, I know
it's not me, but some of the other garbage that flows
out......................

I can hear the delightful (gag!) Christopher Pyne pontificating in the
background on TV and already I'm soooooo sick of vaudeville that I'll be
incredibly relieved when the Fed election is finally over. How any
electorate could send him to Parliament is beyond me - must be a majority of
total Wallies in his electorate.

and also a bit horrified about other spelling mistakes (actual
mistakes) in their leaflets - but let's not go there again. perhaps i am
also horrified that,


I also have real thing about spelling mistakes and especially ones from
organisation that should be capable of doing a better job. It' so sloppily
unprofessional. But having said that, I have heard lots of good reports of
the Yeomans Plows (gag again!)

for a machinery company, they have a LOT of opinions


God!!! So does the delectible Christopher Pyne. If his whiny tone of voice
is any indication, the Govt must be getting very nervous. I wish he'd shut
up or the anchor person would put an apple in his mouth before roasting him.

(albeit badly-spelled ;-). there is an element of horror that i have no
idea at all about farm machinery & can't make heads or tails of most of
it. g


You sound a bit like I do when it comes to reading the technology ads that
arrive in the Saturday papers. I look at the ads and haven't got a clue
what the product they are advertising actually does. I can recognise a
computer or an I-poddy thing and even one of those itty bitty Monitor topped
cameras, or external HD, but some of the other stuff?????????????

So what is it you don't understand. Not that I can necessarily help you but
their may be some comfort in mutual ignorance.

I've asked them to send me their "RED BOOK" but that was some time ago now
and the sodding thing still hasn't arrived. Now that the rain ahs arrived
we need to get moving on a suitable plough to fit our tractor's capacity.



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Old 09-03-2007, 12:51 PM posted to aus.gardens
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"Chookie" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"0tterbot" wrote:


right. after a bit of back-and-forthing, yeomans have sent me their
catalogue, and various other burblings. i'm a bit horrified that they are
pro-nuclear. and also a bit horrified about other spelling mistakes
(actual
mistakes) in their leaflets - but let's not go there again. perhaps i am
also horrified that, for a machinery company, they have a LOT of opinions
(albeit badly-spelled ;-).


I find some of the opinions of the Diggers Club a bit horrific
(particularly
the nonsense they talk about native plants), but I still buy their seeds.


Have you used Eden seeds at all?




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