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Old 07-12-2013, 11:26 AM
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Question Almost nothing grows here. Any advice?

I live in Arkengarthdale at 1200+ feet. (google it )
It's windy. It's cold. I love it but plants don't.

I planted several Sea Buckthorn three years ago.
Three only still survive.

The only plant to live more than a year is Honeysuckle.
Except a hardy fuscia which lasted four years.

Ah! I tell a lie! Rosa 'Fru Dagmar Hastrup' (I think, I'm no flower expert) has survived for as long as the honeysuckle.
I never can decide whether to dead head or leave the BIG hips for the winter birds, (those that can survive).

I have made up some raised beds to try and combat the killing conditions.
Yet to be proven since something decimated my brassicas before they had a chance to grow.
Even the sage pants were eaten.
Leeks still survive but don't look as if they will make a meal. Ever.

I'm guessing even Gardener's World wouldn't rise to this challenge,

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Old 07-12-2013, 04:30 PM
kay kay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HerbyPeter View Post
I live in Arkengarthdale at 1200+ feet. (google it )
It's windy. It's cold. I love it but plants don't.

I planted several Sea Buckthorn three years ago.
Three only still survive.

The only plant to live more than a year is Honeysuckle.
Except a hardy fuscia which lasted four years.

Ah! I tell a lie! Rosa 'Fru Dagmar Hastrup' (I think, I'm no flower expert) has survived for as long as the honeysuckle.
I never can decide whether to dead head or leave the BIG hips for the winter birds, (those that can survive).

I have made up some raised beds to try and combat the killing conditions.
Yet to be proven since something decimated my brassicas before they had a chance to grow.
Even the sage pants were eaten.
Leeks still survive but don't look as if they will make a meal. Ever.

I'm guessing even Gardener's World wouldn't rise to this challenge,
What do you want to grow? You won't be able to grow things that grow in the low lands, but there are all sorts of things that grow sat higher levels that we might find more challenging. But is what you're saying that you want to grow vegetables?

Tell us what sort of garden you'd like and how much space you have. Also what sort of soil - presumably your base rock is limestone, but do you have a peaty covering or are you on lime?
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Old 07-12-2013, 05:04 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Almost nothing grows here. Any advice?

On 07/12/2013 10:26, HerbyPeter wrote:

I live in Arkengarthdale at 1200+ feet. (google it )
It's windy. It's cold. I love it but plants don't.

I planted several Sea Buckthorn three years ago.
Three only still survive.

The only plant to live more than a year is Honeysuckle.
Except a hardy fuscia which lasted four years.

Ah! I tell a lie! Rosa 'Fru Dagmar Hastrup' (I think, I'm no flower
expert) has survived for as long as the honeysuckle.
I never can decide whether to dead head or leave the BIG hips for the
winter birds, (those that can survive).

I have made up some raised beds to try and combat the killing
conditions.
Yet to be proven since something decimated my brassicas before they had
a chance to grow.
Even the sage pants were eaten.
Leeks still survive but don't look as if they will make a meal. Ever.

I'm guessing even Gardener's World wouldn't rise to this challenge,


You could try seeking advice from Hartside Nursery (south of Alston) or
Inshriach Nursery (south of Aviemore), or look at what's grown in Tromso
or Reykjavik Botanic Gardens.

What you should do is grow plants adapted to the environment. Depending
on the substrate, one obvious possibility is heather (ling). Another is
the alpine willows.

--
Stewart Robert Hinsley
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Old 07-12-2013, 05:15 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Almost nothing grows here. Any advice?

On 07/12/2013 16:04, Stewart Robert Hinsley wrote:
On 07/12/2013 10:26, HerbyPeter wrote:

I live in Arkengarthdale at 1200+ feet. (google it )
It's windy. It's cold. I love it but plants don't.

I planted several Sea Buckthorn three years ago.
Three only still survive.

The only plant to live more than a year is Honeysuckle.
Except a hardy fuscia which lasted four years.

Ah! I tell a lie! Rosa 'Fru Dagmar Hastrup' (I think, I'm no flower
expert) has survived for as long as the honeysuckle.
I never can decide whether to dead head or leave the BIG hips for the
winter birds, (those that can survive).

I have made up some raised beds to try and combat the killing
conditions.
Yet to be proven since something decimated my brassicas before they had
a chance to grow.
Even the sage pants were eaten.
Leeks still survive but don't look as if they will make a meal. Ever.

I'm guessing even Gardener's World wouldn't rise to this challenge,


You could try seeking advice from Hartside Nursery (south of Alston) or
Inshriach Nursery (south of Aviemore), or look at what's grown in Tromso
or Reykjavik Botanic Gardens.

What you should do is grow plants adapted to the environment. Depending
on the substrate, one obvious possibility is heather (ling). Another is
the alpine willows.

How large is your garden?
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Old 07-12-2013, 05:32 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Almost nothing grows here. Any advice?

"HerbyPeter" wrote ...


I live in Arkengarthdale at 1200+ feet. (google it )
It's windy. It's cold. I love it but plants don't.

I planted several Sea Buckthorn three years ago.
Three only still survive.

The only plant to live more than a year is Honeysuckle.
Except a hardy fuscia which lasted four years.

Ah! I tell a lie! Rosa 'Fru Dagmar Hastrup' (I think, I'm no flower
expert) has survived for as long as the honeysuckle.
I never can decide whether to dead head or leave the BIG hips for the
winter birds, (those that can survive).

I have made up some raised beds to try and combat the killing
conditions.
Yet to be proven since something decimated my brassicas before they had
a chance to grow.
Even the sage pants were eaten.
Leeks still survive but don't look as if they will make a meal. Ever.

I'm guessing even Gardener's World wouldn't rise to this challenge,


Sounds like you need a wind break around your garden, have you room to plant
one?

Take a look at this which gives you ideas for what to use as windbreaks and
what to plant to cope with the wind.
http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/...e.aspx?pid=472
Yes I know you are not on the coast but you do have the strong winds they
do.
--
Regards. Bob Hobden.
Posted to this Newsgroup from the W of London, UK



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Old 07-12-2013, 06:02 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Almost nothing grows here. Any advice?

On 07/12/2013 16:32, Bob Hobden wrote:
"HerbyPeter" wrote ...


I live in Arkengarthdale at 1200+ feet. (google it )
It's windy. It's cold. I love it but plants don't.

I planted several Sea Buckthorn three years ago.
Three only still survive.

The only plant to live more than a year is Honeysuckle.
Except a hardy fuscia which lasted four years.

Ah! I tell a lie! Rosa 'Fru Dagmar Hastrup' (I think, I'm no flower
expert) has survived for as long as the honeysuckle.
I never can decide whether to dead head or leave the BIG hips for the
winter birds, (those that can survive).

I have made up some raised beds to try and combat the killing
conditions.
Yet to be proven since something decimated my brassicas before they had
a chance to grow.
Even the sage pants were eaten.
Leeks still survive but don't look as if they will make a meal. Ever.

I'm guessing even Gardener's World wouldn't rise to this challenge,


Sounds like you need a wind break around your garden, have you room to
plant one?

Take a look at this which gives you ideas for what to use as windbreaks
and what to plant to cope with the wind.
http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/...e.aspx?pid=472
Yes I know you are not on the coast but you do have the strong winds
they do.


He'll have the problem that he needs a windbreak that can cope with the
cold as well as with high winds (but it doesn't need to be
salt-tolerant). I was wondering if juniper was suitable.

--
Stewart Robert Hinsley
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Old 07-12-2013, 07:06 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Almost nothing grows here. Any advice?

In article , HerbyPeter.d18e8b7
@gardenbanter.co.uk says...

I live in Arkengarthdale at 1200+ feet. (google it )
It's windy. It's cold. I love it but plants don't.

I planted several Sea Buckthorn three years ago.
Three only still survive.


That's no surprise; "sea" is a clue. They like sandy, sunny, salty.
You could hardly be further from the coast.

The only plant to live more than a year is Honeysuckle.
Except a hardy fuscia which lasted four years.


Your place must be considerably warmer than my previous high moorland
garden in Scotland then. "Hardy fuchsia", means in comparison to other
more tender fuschsias; it doesn't mean hardy enough for coldest climate.
Even "hardy" fuschsia is not a particularly hardy plant and will die in
many high cold inland gardens.

Ah! I tell a lie! Rosa 'Fru Dagmar Hastrup' (I think, I'm no flower
expert) has survived for as long as the honeysuckle.


There you go, If that survives, other plants can too.

I never can decide whether to dead head or leave the BIG hips for the
winter birds, (those that can survive).

I have made up some raised beds to try and combat the killing
conditions.


Which "killing conditions" do you think a raised bed will defeat ?

Annual rainfall, lowest winter temp, highest windspeed, depth of snow
would be useful to know. And which direction the garden faces.

All gardeners' plant choices are limited by location, soil and
climate. It's a matter of choosing the right plants for the conditions.
You need to provide more information about the conditions. (see above).

Janet.



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Old 07-12-2013, 07:15 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Almost nothing grows here. Any advice?

"Stewart Robert Hinsley" wrote

Bob Hobden wrote:
"HerbyPeter" wrote ...


I live in Arkengarthdale at 1200+ feet. (google it )
It's windy. It's cold. I love it but plants don't.

I planted several Sea Buckthorn three years ago.
Three only still survive.

The only plant to live more than a year is Honeysuckle.
Except a hardy fuscia which lasted four years.

Ah! I tell a lie! Rosa 'Fru Dagmar Hastrup' (I think, I'm no flower
expert) has survived for as long as the honeysuckle.
I never can decide whether to dead head or leave the BIG hips for the
winter birds, (those that can survive).

I have made up some raised beds to try and combat the killing
conditions.
Yet to be proven since something decimated my brassicas before they had
a chance to grow.
Even the sage pants were eaten.
Leeks still survive but don't look as if they will make a meal. Ever.

I'm guessing even Gardener's World wouldn't rise to this challenge,


Sounds like you need a wind break around your garden, have you room to
plant one?

Take a look at this which gives you ideas for what to use as windbreaks
and what to plant to cope with the wind.
http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/...e.aspx?pid=472
Yes I know you are not on the coast but you do have the strong winds
they do.


He'll have the problem that he needs a windbreak that can cope with the
cold as well as with high winds (but it doesn't need to be salt-tolerant).
I was wondering if juniper was suitable.


I would have thought Rowans would be OK especially the Sorbus aucuparia var
sibirica and var glabrata. Likewise Scots Pine should also cope and that
will provide a tall windbreak IDC. He could try Bristlecone Pines if he
could find any for sale but they are slow growing (at least mine is) also
Pinus mugo which is similar as it comes from mountains in central Europe as
apposed to N.America. Crataegus laevigata would be another candidate.
Lots on those lists are worth checking out for cold hardiness as they are
all wind tolerant.
--
Regards. Bob Hobden.
Posted to this Newsgroup from the W of London, UK

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Old 07-12-2013, 11:17 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Almost nothing grows here. Any advice?

On 07/12/2013 15:30, kay wrote:
Tell us what sort of garden you'd like and how much space you have. Also
what sort of soil - presumably your base rock is limestone, but do you
have a peaty covering or are you on lime?


The rocks of Arkengarthdale belong to the Yoredale Series, which is
formed of a mixture of limestones and clastic deposits. So some bits of
the valley have limestone as a base rock and other bits don't.

--
Stewart Robert Hinsley
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Old 07-12-2013, 11:21 PM
kay kay is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stewart Robert Hinsley[_3_] View Post
He'll have the problem that he needs a windbreak that can cope with the
cold as well as with high winds (but it doesn't need to be
salt-tolerant). I was wondering if juniper was suitable.
Juniper dieback from Phytophthora austrocedrae is caising a problem in N England at the moment - I'd steer well clear of juniper at the moment.

There's narrow strips of woodland in the valleys in Arkengarthdale up to about 350m, but he's higher than that. A shelter belt of trees is going to be a challenge.
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Old 08-12-2013, 01:36 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Almost nothing grows here. Any advice?

On Sat, 7 Dec 2013 18:15:00 -0000, Bob Hobden wrote:

I live in Arkengarthdale at 1200+ feet. (google it )
It's windy. It's cold. I love it but plants don't.


Snap but add 200' to that altitude and a few tens of miles further
north up to the middle of the North Pennines ANOB.

I have made up some raised beds to try and combat the killing
conditions.


Wind anytime and winter cold are the killing conditions here. I can't
see how a raised bed is going to help either of those, you'll lift
the plants up into the wind and let the frost at the roots in the
winter.

He'll have the problem that he needs a windbreak that can cope

with the
cold as well as with high winds (but it doesn't need to be
salt-tolerant). I was wondering if juniper was suitable.


I would have thought Rowans would be OK especially the Sorbus aucuparia
var sibirica and var glabrata. Likewise Scots Pine should also cope and
that will provide a tall windbreak IDC.


Juniper should survive, make sure you get a native variety it is a
threatened shrub/tree. Rowan, Birch, Ash, Scots Pine, Larch should
also survive.

Note the use of the word "survive", the growing season is very short
and still harsh. We planted 800+ trees (as slips) 10+ years ago, 20%
didn't make it through the first winter, 10% didn't make it through
the second. They vary in size from a slender 8' saplings with a few
small twigs near the top to small, maybe 15', wind swept trees.
Probably down to the variations in ground it goes from well drained
"chalk downland" with hair bells, cotton grass, scabious to wet peaty
soil.

For creating a wind break Birch or Rowan is probably the best bet but
don't expect much result in less than five years. Ash takes years to
establish but then grows reasonably well considering that it's
normally just coming into leaf two weeks after everything else and
drops it's leaves two weeks earlier than everthing else.

What else have we got that doesn't disappear? Crocosmia, wooly
willow, london pride, red and black currants (they are sheltered
behind 5' drystone walls), buddleia (but only just, the season is
almost too short for it), snow in summer, geraniums (hardy!), fuschia
(again a hardy variety), forget-me-not (one my late mothers
favorites, I'm hoping the few examples we have will self seed around
the place), docks, thistles, nettles and ragwort also seem to like it
but we don't like them so they are slowly being eradicated by pulling
or strimming the patches.

The key is probably selection of probably suitable plants and
patience. Just because something disappears the year after it was
planted don't assume it's dead, it may well just be resting from the
shock! We have had stuff come back in the third year.

--
Cheers
Dave.



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Old 08-12-2013, 01:54 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Almost nothing grows here. Any advice?

On Sat, 07 Dec 2013 16:04:46 +0000, Stewart Robert Hinsley wrote:

You could try seeking advice from Hartside Nursery (south of Alston)


http://www.plantswithaltitude.co.uk

or Pennine Perennials:

http://www.pennineperennials.co.uk

In Garrigill nr Alston and not a million miles from Hartside Nursery.
We tend to get plants from Pennine Perennials, they seem to cope with
the move to 1400' and exposed better than those from Hartside Nursey.
Hartside Nursery is at about 1100' but tucked into a small wooded
valley, Pennine Perenials is at only 1000' in the bottom of the South
Tyne valley but has a far more open aspect.

We don't expect plants from other climes to make the transition even
ones that should be tolerant of the conditions. Ones that do make it
also tend to be the ones that "take a year off" as previously
mentioned.

--
Cheers
Dave.



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Old 08-12-2013, 11:33 AM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Almost nothing grows here. Any advice?

On 2013-12-07 18:15:00 +0000, Bob Hobden said:

"Stewart Robert Hinsley" wrote

Bob Hobden wrote:
"HerbyPeter" wrote ...


I live in Arkengarthdale at 1200+ feet. (google it )
It's windy. It's cold. I love it but plants don't.

I planted several Sea Buckthorn three years ago.
Three only still survive.

The only plant to live more than a year is Honeysuckle.
Except a hardy fuscia which lasted four years.

Ah! I tell a lie! Rosa 'Fru Dagmar Hastrup' (I think, I'm no flower
expert) has survived for as long as the honeysuckle.
I never can decide whether to dead head or leave the BIG hips for the
winter birds, (those that can survive).

I have made up some raised beds to try and combat the killing
conditions.
Yet to be proven since something decimated my brassicas before they had
a chance to grow.
Even the sage pants were eaten.
Leeks still survive but don't look as if they will make a meal. Ever.

I'm guessing even Gardener's World wouldn't rise to this challenge,


Sounds like you need a wind break around your garden, have you room to
plant one?

Take a look at this which gives you ideas for what to use as windbreaks
and what to plant to cope with the wind.
http://apps.rhs.org.uk/advicesearch/...e.aspx?pid=472
Yes I know you are not on the coast but you do have the strong winds
they do.


He'll have the problem that he needs a windbreak that can cope with the
cold as well as with high winds (but it doesn't need to be
salt-tolerant). I was wondering if juniper was suitable.


I would have thought Rowans would be OK especially the Sorbus aucuparia
var sibirica and var glabrata. Likewise Scots Pine should also cope and
that will provide a tall windbreak IDC. He could try Bristlecone Pines
if he could find any for sale but they are slow growing (at least mine
is) also Pinus mugo which is similar as it comes from mountains in
central Europe as apposed to N.America. Crataegus laevigata would be
another candidate.
Lots on those lists are worth checking out for cold hardiness as they
are all wind tolerant.


I wonder if Rowans would take that sort of high wind without bits
snapping off too easily.
--

Sacha
www.hillhousenursery.com
South Devon
www.helpforheroes.org.uk

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Old 08-12-2013, 03:32 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Almost nothing grows here. Any advice?


There's narrow strips of woodland in the valleys in Arkengarthdale up to
about 350m, but he's higher than that. A shelter belt of trees is going
to be a challenge.


If he even exists, he's shown no interest in any follow up.


Gorse makes a fantastic shelterbelt and so does hawthorn. They can
both be clipped really hard into gale-defying mounds.


And if you use the double form of Gorse then there is no chance of it
seeding itself everywhere

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Old 08-12-2013, 03:52 PM posted to uk.rec.gardening
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Default Almost nothing grows here. Any advice?

On Sun, 8 Dec 2013 10:33:12 +0000, Sacha wrote:

I wonder if Rowans would take that sort of high wind without bits
snapping off too easily.


Another common name for Rowan is Mountain Ash... The Rowans here
stand up, literally, to the wind better than the Briches. The Briches
have that decidely curved wind blow look with much less growth on the
exposed side. The Rowans are much more vertical with less reduction
in growth on the exposed side.

--
Cheers
Dave.





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